Will Libraries become stewards of our Open Data Collections | Chris Moore | Pulse | LinkedIn

“What I have been thinking about lately is the role of our Public Libraries as stewards of Open Data.  As long as I can remember the Library and our Librarians are the stewards of information, those that guide us on our quests for knowledge.  What if our libraries had a person who had a responsibility for the communities Open Data collection.  This elevates data beyond just something a government “chooses” to release to a set of important current and historic information that needs to be curated.”

THE TRANSFERABILITY OF TRUSTED DIGITAL REPOSITORY STANDARDS TO AN EAST AFRICAN CONTEXT

[From the ABSTRACT] Digital preservation is a topic that has been extensively explored over the last thirty years in the fields of archival and information studies. However, relatively little literature has touched on the topic of Trusted Digital Repositories (TDRs). A TDR is ‘[A]n archive, consisting of an organization of people and systems that has accepted the responsibility to preserve information and make it available for a Designated Community.’1 Standards governing TDRs, namely the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) and Repository Audit and Certification (RAC), have been designed and tested by developed nations with minimal reference to the developing world. Little attempt has been made to question whether these standards, entirely developed in one context, are actually transferable or applicable to another. There is an assumption, however, that because these standards have been generalised, they are ubiquitous and robust, transferable to any locale. This thesis seeks to question the basic assumptions that are made when standards or best practice created in the developed world are applied to different contexts outside of the original milieu of elaboration. Further, this thesis considers the applicability of TDRs to the Eastern African archival context …”