Celebrating 20?years of open access publishing at BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders | BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders | Full Text

“Twenty years ago, on October 23, the first article published by BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders appeared free online. Over 5700 publications later, we celebrate our anniversary as the largest Open Access journal in the ‘Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine’ and ‘Rheumatology’ fields. Our ‘open, inclusive, and trusted’ ethos, along with our efficient and robust peer review services, are recognized by the musculoskeletal field.

The early pioneers of BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders pushed the Open Access publishing model, in order to better support the needs of both the clinical and research communities. We pride ourselves on the continual innovation of author services, data transparency, and peer review models. These advances would not have been possible without your efforts – so a massive thank you to all the authors, editorial teams, and reviewers who have contributed to our success. Excellent reviewers are the nucleus of any thriving journal, and we have been lucky to collaborate with so many talents….”

 

10M ORCID iDs! | ORCID

“At the end of 2012, just three months after we launched the ORCID registry, we were thrilled to be able to share that nearly 50,000 researchers had already registered for an iD. Ten months after that, we celebrated the ORCID record growing to nearly 250,000 (with 80 Members!) All told, it took us just a little over two years to grow to 1,000,000 iDs, and nine months after that, in 2015, we hit 1.5 million iDs. 

Since 2015 we’ve been steadily growing and exceeding even our own high expectations:

In 2015, the record grew by 788,650 records,
In 2016, by 1,068,295,
In 2017, 1,388,796,
In 2018, it grew by 1,585,851,
In 2019, by 2,006,672, and
In 2020 (so far), it’s grown by 2,293,631! 

And just last week ORCID hit another major milestone: 10 million registered ORCID iDs! …”

DOAB milestones: 30,000 OA books, 400 publishers

“We are pleased to share that the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) recently reached three key milestones in terms of book coverage, unique publishers and future financial sustainability. 

Over 30,000 books from more than 400 publishers 

The number of open access books included in DOAB has grown impressively from just over 10,000 books in 2018 to 31,917 as of today. In terms of publishers, we are happy to see that over 400 publishers are included in DOAB as we strive to improve the coverage of the directory….”

Altmetric celebrates ten years of altmetrics with landmark State of Altmetrics report – Digital Science

“In honour of the ten-year anniversary of the publication of the Altmetrics Manifesto, Altmetric has published a landmark report, The State of Altmetrics.

In the report, changemakers including Altmetric founder Euan Adie, esteemed scientometricians Lutz Bornmann, Zohreh Zahedi and Saeed Ul-Hassan, and the original Altmetrics Manifesto authors Jason Priem, Paul Groth and Cameron Neylon reflect on a decade of altmetrics innovation and growth.

Topics discussed include the ethics and responsible use of altmetrics, using machine learning to understand how communities coalesce around particular research topics online, and possibilities for leveraging altmetrics as “sensors” to detect the spread of disease. The report also shares the results of a worldwide community survey, which surmises that altmetrics will continue to grow in their adoption and use.

Report editor and Altmetric Director of Research Relations, Stacy Konkiel adds: “There is so much creativity in these pages. I’m convinced we’ve only scratched the surface when it comes to how altmetrics can be used to improve research communication and knowledge mobilization for all.”

To read the full report, visit https://www.altmetric.com/about-altmetrics/the-state-of-altmetrics/  …”

News – The Open Library of Humanities Celebrates its 5th Birthday

“The Open Library of Humanities today celebrates its 5th anniversary since we launched our platform on 28th September 2015 with only 7 journals and 99 supporting institutions. Five years on, our sustainable business model has attracted nearly 300 supporting institutions, proving the success of its pioneering non-classical economic model, and enabling us to establish a thriving platform of 28 peer-reviewed journals.

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a scholar-led charitable organisation dedicated to publishing world-leading open access humanities scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges. Launched five years ago, our free-to-read, free-to-publish model was established to challenge the costly, limited routes to open access publication in the humanities, and find a sustainable business model to enable academic journals to publish peer-reviewed research without charges to author or reader – making world-leading research accessible to anyone.

The platform was initially funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and now, five years after its launch, entirely covers its costs by payments from its international library consortium. The international consortium of libraries comprises nearly 300 institutions including Harvard Library, Cambridge, Yale, Princeton, and many others. With this model, the OLH has expanded from 7 journals in 2015 to 28 journals in 2020, has four full-time staff, and funds two external commercial university presses (Ubiquity Press and Liverpool University Press) to convert their journals to open access. The OLH also developed and launched Janeway in 2017, its own field-leading innovative open source publishing platform developed fully in-house….”

News – The Open Library of Humanities Celebrates its 5th Birthday

“The Open Library of Humanities today celebrates its 5th anniversary since we launched our platform on 28th September 2015 with only 7 journals and 99 supporting institutions. Five years on, our sustainable business model has attracted nearly 300 supporting institutions, proving the success of its pioneering non-classical economic model, and enabling us to establish a thriving platform of 28 peer-reviewed journals.

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a scholar-led charitable organisation dedicated to publishing world-leading open access humanities scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges. Launched five years ago, our free-to-read, free-to-publish model was established to challenge the costly, limited routes to open access publication in the humanities, and find a sustainable business model to enable academic journals to publish peer-reviewed research without charges to author or reader – making world-leading research accessible to anyone.

The platform was initially funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and now, five years after its launch, entirely covers its costs by payments from its international library consortium. The international consortium of libraries comprises nearly 300 institutions including Harvard Library, Cambridge, Yale, Princeton, and many others. With this model, the OLH has expanded from 7 journals in 2015 to 28 journals in 2020, has four full-time staff, and funds two external commercial university presses (Ubiquity Press and Liverpool University Press) to convert their journals to open access. The OLH also developed and launched Janeway in 2017, its own field-leading innovative open source publishing platform developed fully in-house….”

HighWire at 25: David Worlock looks back – Highwire Press

“So we emerge into the world of AI. In fact of course it has been with us all along, changing its name from ‘Expert systems’ to ‘neural networks’ as a way of disguising the fact that it didn’t deliver to our wildest expectations. Now that it is finally beginning to deliver, it can shoulder many duties for scholarly research. All that peer-review reference checking and concept analysis, for example. But these are the foothills. It is when AI becomes the way that researchers read other people’s research that things really get interesting. Released from the time-consuming literature, researchers may be free to research and self-publish. But acts of self-publishing may simply be releasing formatted work into the network, or opening access to the network for a digital lab notebook. Imagine Jupyter notebooks of the future where colleagues and collaborators could see and annotate ?ndings, or test reproducibility from the data available on board? As we move from Open Access to Open Science, overt acts of ‘publishing’ may become as rare as overt acts of textual reading. The minds of librarians (e.g. Hypergraph from Liberate Science) already lean in this direction….”

1000 papers published in JOSS | Journal of Open Source Software Blog

“Today we reached a huge milestone at JOSS – we published our 1000th paper! JOSS is a developer friendly, free-to-publish, open-access journal for research software packages. Publishing 1000 papers (and reviewing the corresponding 1000 software packages) over the past ~4 years has been no small feat. This achievement has been possible thanks to the efforts of our journal team and community of reviewers who have all given their time to make JOSS a success. We take this opportunity to review some of what we’ve learnt over the past four years and outline some plans for the future….”