Get ready for Horizon Europe: Open Science – The Guild

“Open Science will become the modus operandi in Horizon Europe, the next EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation. This will affect provisions such as those regarding publications, research data management, and the engagement of citizens in the project.

To provide a glimpse into the expected changes, The Guild interviewed Mr. Konstantinos Glinos, Head of Unit for Open Science at the European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation (DG RTD). 

During this discussion, we first explore the topic of Open Science as a strategic priority, its contribution to research efficiency, and the barriers that prevent the speeding up and the uptake and implementation of Open Science. We then delve into the main changes expected in Horizon Europe in the areas of Open Access, research data management, and Citizen Science. Finally, we also examine how Open Science could be embedded in the entire research process, from the methodology definition until the sharing of final results.  

We hope this video will help researchers and institutions to prepare for the forthcoming requirements in Horizon Europe….”

Get ready for Horizon Europe: Open Science – The Guild

“Open Science will become the modus operandi in Horizon Europe, the next EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation. This will affect provisions such as those regarding publications, research data management, and the engagement of citizens in the project.

To provide a glimpse into the expected changes, The Guild interviewed Mr. Konstantinos Glinos, Head of Unit for Open Science at the European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation (DG RTD). 

During this discussion, we first explore the topic of Open Science as a strategic priority, its contribution to research efficiency, and the barriers that prevent the speeding up and the uptake and implementation of Open Science. We then delve into the main changes expected in Horizon Europe in the areas of Open Access, research data management, and Citizen Science. Finally, we also examine how Open Science could be embedded in the entire research process, from the methodology definition until the sharing of final results.  

We hope this video will help researchers and institutions to prepare for the forthcoming requirements in Horizon Europe….”

We have no time to waste in the transition to Open Access

“I understand why you say that, but I don’t think that is necessarily the case. cOAlition S has been faulted for focusing primarily on an accelerated transition towards Open Access by legacy publishers and existing journals. But let us not forget that these existing journals are where the grantholders of the cOAlition S funders want to publish. One the one hand, we ask of our researchers that they keep copyright and publish in CC-By. But in return we feel that we have to make sure that they can keep publishing in the journals that they know and love. So that means we decided to focus on creating incentives for the transformation of these journals into Open Access journals, steering them away from the hybrid impasse….

Publishers who wish to stick with subscription journals will have to give their authors the right to keep copyright and to publish in CC-BY, and additionally allow them to immediately deposit a copy of the AAM or the VoR in a Green repository. Note that publishers such as Sage and Emerald already allow authors to deposit their articles in a repository without embargo…..”

Furthering Open Access: A Conversation With Alicia Wise- ATG Original – Against the Grain

“All the publishers I know are very actively working on OA. In fact, last year when we did the Society Publishers Accelerating OA and Plan S project for cOAlition S I was surprised that a couple of our project participants had no OA journals. These were quite small humanities to and social science publishers. OA is here to stay and is an established and growing feature of every publisher’s market. 

Will your readers enjoy a fish simile? Elsevier and other large publishers are like fish swimming in the sunlight zone of the ocean: they are very visible to librarians and other stakeholders in scholarly communication. Recently we’ve been doing quite a lot of work with smaller independent publishers of all kinds. These are like fish swimming in the twilight zone of the ocean: also beautiful, strong, and varied but less visible. In these waters there are many potential OA shoalmates for librarians  with very similar missions and serving the same researchers. …”

Reopening plans and the future of open scholarship: A call for participation | Invest in Open Infrastructure

“Over the last few months we’ve been in conversation with colleagues in higher education about what they see as the challenges that lie ahead as they weigh reopening plans and longer term effects of the global pandemic. Starting June 29th, we will be launching our first research effort to support institutional decision-making in research and scholarship.

For the next six months, we will be working with representatives across key areas of the scholarly research lifecycle on a coordinated approach for the future of scholarship and research at the institutional level….

The project sets out to deliver the following resources and services to partners:

A framework and set of shared criteria to support assessment of open systems and solutions in service of the academy;
Cost-benefit analyses to enable faster, more informed decision making in support of open scholarship;
Actionable recommendations and guidance for budget owners;
Actionable recommendations and models for projects to operate sustainably;
Scenario planning for 6, 12, and 18+ months outlooks;
A collective model for stewardship, cost-sharing, and risk pooling….

Participation is straightforward: 1-2 interviews, and an invitation to join us for 2-4 targeted feedback sessions over the course of the next six months. To sign up, please add your information to this form. …”

Modeling the Future for Open Scholarship – Call for interviews – Google Docs

“Universities and colleges leaders have an opportunity — and an obligation — to build a plan today that addresses strains on existing infrastructure and also looks to the future needs to support its students, researchers, and faculty. That calls for thinking through what a “preparedness” model looks like for higher education and research writ large, one that takes into account the economic implications on the university itself as well as on the services and enterprises it relies on, like publishing and data management infrastructures. …

We propose the creation of a coordinated, cross-institutional “preparedness plan”, in partnership with Invest in Open Infrastructure (IOI), to begin work on identifying the opportunities, leverage points, costs and approaches that could be employed to enable the following: 

Creation of shared set of principles to help assess solutions based on a values-based framework;

Support that addresses heightened demands on universities as they shift operations online and transform the way they serve their communities;

Coordinated scenario planning that plans for a radical shift towards open scholarship and a convergence on existing, open tools and services;

Ways to pool resources and risk to maximize cost-effectiveness and minimize system failure; 

Creation of a shared action plan to facilitate coordinated decision-making ensuring research continuity;

Bolster researcher productivity, continuity, and growth in both the near and long-term. …

 

Call for University Participation. We are currently seeking university representatives to join us as key participants in this work. Representatives should be able to provide information about the realities abilities at their university, and could consist of roles including, but not limited to university librarians, program directors, technology leads, Vice Provosts, and Deans. Participants will need to be able to speak to budget and programmatic decisions within their department and be able to provide insight to other changes at their Institution.”

Modeling the Future for Open Scholarship – Call for interviews – Google Docs

“Universities and colleges leaders have an opportunity — and an obligation — to build a plan today that addresses strains on existing infrastructure and also looks to the future needs to support its students, researchers, and faculty. That calls for thinking through what a “preparedness” model looks like for higher education and research writ large, one that takes into account the economic implications on the university itself as well as on the services and enterprises it relies on, like publishing and data management infrastructures. …

We propose the creation of a coordinated, cross-institutional “preparedness plan”, in partnership with Invest in Open Infrastructure (IOI), to begin work on identifying the opportunities, leverage points, costs and approaches that could be employed to enable the following: 

Creation of shared set of principles to help assess solutions based on a values-based framework;

Support that addresses heightened demands on universities as they shift operations online and transform the way they serve their communities;

Coordinated scenario planning that plans for a radical shift towards open scholarship and a convergence on existing, open tools and services;

Ways to pool resources and risk to maximize cost-effectiveness and minimize system failure; 

Creation of a shared action plan to facilitate coordinated decision-making ensuring research continuity;

Bolster researcher productivity, continuity, and growth in both the near and long-term. …

 

Call for University Participation. We are currently seeking university representatives to join us as key participants in this work. Representatives should be able to provide information about the realities abilities at their university, and could consist of roles including, but not limited to university librarians, program directors, technology leads, Vice Provosts, and Deans. Participants will need to be able to speak to budget and programmatic decisions within their department and be able to provide insight to other changes at their Institution.”

Sharing Openly Licensed Content on Social Media: A Conversation with GLAM

The following is a summary of “GLAM Collections on Social Media: Navigating Copyright Questions—a conversation with Aleksandra Strzelichowska, Mikka Gee Conway and Anne Young” published on 31 May 2020 by Scann (licensed CC BY). 

How often do you debate whether to share an openly licensed work on social media? If you do share a work, how often do you fret over whether you’ve provided proper attribution? I’ll answer first: All the time!

Sharing openly licensed works (e.g. images, GIFs, videos, etc.) on social platforms can feel like a fraught space to venture into—and as we’ve learned over the last few years, this is especially true for GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives, and museums). To answer some of the recurring questions these institutions have about sharing openly licensed works on their social media platforms, including works from their own collections, the copyright community at Europeana, Open GLAM, and the Special Interest Group on Intellectual Property at the Museum Computer Network organized a digital panel featuring Aleksandra Strzelichowska (Senior Online Marketing Specialist at Europeana Foundation), Mikka Gee Conway (General Counsel, the Getty Museum), and Anne Young (Director of Legal Affairs and Intellectual Property at Newfields) on 30 April 2020. 

In this post, I briefly summarize a few notes from this discussion to help inform your decisions on what and how to share on social media.

Copyright policies and guidance for sharing on social media accounts

Europeana follows a four-page document that includes clear guidelines for sharing content online. Essentially, the organization only shares media that is deemed “freely re-usable,” which means it’s in the public domain (e.g. through CC0) or licensed CC BY or CC BY-SA. If a piece of content has a “no reuse statement” then Europeana will seek individual permissions from the copyright holder—but that’s a rare occurrence. The Getty Museum’s general policy is to only share copyrighted content if Getty holds the copyright license or if it can make a strong “fair use” case. Otherwise, Getty tends to focus on sharing material found in the public domain. Finally, Newfields follows a similar policy as Getty. In particular, it focuses on seeking permission for reusing works from donors, affiliated artists, and/or estates. 

Policies in practice: Attribution on social media

An example from Creative Commons on giving attribution for a GIF with a CC BY-NC-ND license on Twitter. See the full example here.

Due to the nature of social media platforms, including the limited character counts, it can be difficult to provide detailed attribution for shared media. However, it’s important to make a concerted effort, particularly if the content being shared is done so under a “fair use” claim. On Twitter, for example, the best practice is to utilize the “reply” function to provide detailed attribution when necessary. On Instagram, it’s more difficult to provide proper attribution since there is no linking function in the description of posts, therefore it may be best to stick with content that is in the public domain or that the organization holds the copyrights to. To overcome this issue, Europeana created a landing page that is linked to in its biography description on Instagram. This page houses all of the images the organization posts on its Instagram account, providing source and attribution information.

For editorial pieces, like blog posts, that are housed on a website and then shared through social media, it’s important to provide attribution for openly licensed works in the body of that post. For example, the caption of an image can contain the attribution information and/or it can be added to the image’s metadata. If the image is in the public domain, it’s best practice to also identify provenance—where the work is stewarded—this includes listing the GLAM the image was sourced from. For more guidance, check out this page.

CC licenses and terms of service: What about NC-licensed content?

This can be a sticky issue for GLAM institutions, complicated by the terms of service for each individual social media platform. Some assume that if a social media platform’s terms require or indicate that a user gives the platform the license to use their content for commercial purposes (like marketing) then the spirit of the NonCommercial (NC) license is violated. Thus, the conservative approach is to avoid posting NC-licensed content. 

However, there is some basis for thinking otherwise. CC Legal Counsel Sarah Pearson explained that CC licenses don’t allow sub-licensing so uploaders are not granting the platform any rights directly to content that isn’t theirs under copyright. Most social media terms of service require that a user either a) owns the copyright to their posted content or b) has the right to use that content. When that’s the case, openly licensed content is appropriate to share on the social media platform as long as the license requirements are followed by the uploader. As for NC-licensed content specifically, so long as the uploader is sharing the content for noncommercial purposes, the NC restriction is likely more of an issue for the platform, if at all, to the extent the platform must rely on the NC license. 

The important role of digital asset management systems

Many organizations, especially GLAM institutions, have digital asset management systems (DAMS) that contain object metadata, including rights information, that everyone within the organization has access to. At Getty, for example, the DAMS is directly supported by a Rights and Reproduction team member that is responsible for entering objects into the system and ensuring the rights information for each object is included. Their system also includes separate folders that specify what an object can be used for, whether it’s for a blog post or a social media post. In some cases, objects are approved for use on the website or for distribution by the media but not for social media platforms, so the DAMS is crucial for ensuring those objects are not used improperly.

Newfields, which also has a DAMS, and Getty offer training to team members on how to use the system since the metadata can be complicated to read and interpret. This is particularly true when non-copyright issues come up for a particular object, such as privacy and/or publicity considerations. Since Europeana aggregates data, its process is more straightforward. Put simply, if the object is on the website then it should be OK to use for any purpose by the marketing and communications team.  

Guidelines and strategies on how users can reuse shared content

La Donna Della FinestraImage credit: La Donna Della Finestra, 1881 by Dante Gabriel Rossetti via Birmingham Museums Trust (CC0). The featured version of this image has icons by Samsul Rizzai, Austin Condiff, Maxim Kulikov, and Kendedes licensed CC BY via the Noun Project.

Europeana has been educating users on reusing its content through engagement initiatives. For example, during the annual GIF IT UP! contest, it routinely educates people on open licensing and attribution requirements. If someone submits a GIF based on a work that is not openly licensed, they receive an email explaining why their submission wasn’t accepted and are given instructions on what they can do to rectify the situation. At Getty, following the launch of its open content program in 2013, the organization published a clear set of terms of use and provided additional educational resources on its website. Today, it’s looking at dedicating many of its open content to the public domain using CC0 so that there’s less confusion for users. 

Open access in the age of COVID-19

The panelists agreed that due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a conversation around copyright has emerged that feels especially urgent as it’s tied to this moment—specifically regarding what GLAMs should and shouldn’t do. In some cases, boundaries are definitely being pushed. However, the panelists urged institutions to take a more cautious and measured approach when embarking on new digital projects and initiatives. “I definitely feel that it’s important to be measured about all this, and think about what it is exactly about our changed situation that might merit pushing boundaries of copyright?,” Mikka argued. “That is absolutely true,” Anne replied, “…at the end of the day, while there might be pushing some boundaries we still need to proceed cautiously because the laws [themselves] haven’t changed.”

P.s. I highly recommend reading the full conversation for more insights and examples from Europeana, Getty, and Newfields—and bookmarking it for future reference! 

Our friends over at Open GLAM want to hear from you! How do you attribute openly licensed works on social media? What challenges are you facing in this area? What training or education are you looking for? Let them know by sending an email, tweeting at OpenGlam, or joining their monthly calls

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