Interview: Cell Genomics

“I am most excited that we are able to publish as a gold open access journal and am grateful to Cell Press for this. It is fitting that we are the first premier research journal to adopt this publishing model, as genomics has pioneered open access. For a field in which the foundation has been based on open access resources and methods, it is essential that the publications are also open access without restrictions, so as to provide broader and more equitable access to this research in ways that drive the progress of science across many fields.

I am equally excited to launch Cell Genomics as an open science journal, providing leadership with best practices in data availability, sharing, and standards. Beyond our publications, we also work with our scientific communities to support open science initiatives in ways that address current challenges and drive progress in genomics and broader scientific research….”

Corona virus will strengthen Open Science | LERU

“The pandemic is a chance to show that Open Science practices, such as sharing the data from trials and investigations, make it possible to find successful treatments and develop successful vaccines quickly, for the benefit of society. So while the pandemic is an appalling threat, it’s also an amazing opportunity to change research culture, so that we emerge from the pandemic stronger than when we went in….”

‘One nation one subscription’ is an elusive goal:

“Muthu Madhan is a long-time crusader for open access (OA) to scholarly literature in India. He has been promoting OA through interoperable institutional repositories – the green route for OA. He has spoken about the importance of OA in different forums, and written articles in popular journals. At present, he is working as Librarian of Azim Premji University. In this interview with Santosh C. Hulagabali, for Open Interview, Madhan shares his observation on OA developments in India and elsewhere. Also, he talks on different issues related to OA. From this conversation, one might trace the important events that gave impetus to OA discussions in India and elsewhere, and the people who inspired Madhan….”

‘One nation one subscription’ is an elusive goal:

“Muthu Madhan is a long-time crusader for open access (OA) to scholarly literature in India. He has been promoting OA through interoperable institutional repositories – the green route for OA. He has spoken about the importance of OA in different forums, and written articles in popular journals. At present, he is working as Librarian of Azim Premji University. In this interview with Santosh C. Hulagabali, for Open Interview, Madhan shares his observation on OA developments in India and elsewhere. Also, he talks on different issues related to OA. From this conversation, one might trace the important events that gave impetus to OA discussions in India and elsewhere, and the people who inspired Madhan….”

Meet PLOS Biology Senior Editor, Gabriel Gasque – PLOS Biologue

“To me, Open Science means acceleration and democratization of scientific discoveries. It means increased transparency of the scientific enterprise and increased accountability of all stakeholders. Open Science maximizes the benefits of the scientific undertaking because it maximizes the sharing of knowledge….”

Initiating a transformative agreement as a small scholarly society: Interview with Gaynor Redvers-Mutton

“Prior to Plan S, many scholarly publishers yet to test out Open Access journal models had begun considering possible approaches, but few guessed they’d be transitioning to OA so quickly. Now, publishers that wish to comply with the initiative to make research funded by cOAlition S members fully and immediately OA, which went into effect on the 1st of January, have been feeling the crunch to condense the kinds of strategic journal program decisions they might have planned over the course of a few years into as little as a few months.

The Microbiology Society was one of the first small publishers to take the plunge to commit to a transition plan from subscription to OA publishing in response to Plan S. As part of the “Society Publishers Accelerating Open Access and Plan S“ (SPA-OPS) project, the society opted to take a Transformative Agreement (TA) Plan S route, one which few small publishers had previously tested. The society managed to develop an institutional set-price Publish and Read (P&R) package from ideation to execution in less than a year. The first P&R TA was a pilot that the society has built upon in subsequent institutional negotiations. The publishing team plans to assess the outcomes of its current transition efforts before deciding on future OA business development steps.

In the interview below, The Microbiology Society’s Head of Business Development & Sales, Gaynor Redvers-Mutton, discusses the rapid approach the society publishing team took to releasing a working TA and how they are thinking about the next phase of their OA publishing program….”

“It’s hard to explain why this is taking so long” – scilog

When it comes into force at the beginning of 2021, the Open Access initiative “Plan S” is poised to help opening up and improving academic publishing. Ulrich Pöschl, a chemist and Open Access advocate of the first hour, explains why free access to research results is important and how an up-to-date academic publishing system can work.

Muthu Madhan: ‘One nation one subscription’ is an elusive goal

Muthu Madhan is a long-time crusader for open access (OA) to scholarly literature in India. He has been promoting OA through interoperable institutional repositories – the green route for OA. He has spoken about the importance of OA in different forums, and written articles in popular journals. At present, he is working as Librarian of Azim Premji University.

In this interview with Santosh C. Hulagabali, for Open Interview, Madhan shares his observation on OA developments in India and elsewhere.  Also, he talks on different issues related to OA.  From this conversation, one might trace the important events that gave impetus to OA discussions in India and elsewhere, and the people who inspired Madhan. 

Everything Hertz: 122: Reoptimizing scientific publishing for the internet age (with Michael Eisen)

“The internet should have transformed science publishing, but it didn’t. We chat with Michael Eisen (Editor-in-Chief of eLife) about reoptimizing scientific publishing and peer review for the internet age.

Here what we cover and some links:

How Michael co-founded PLOS
The book Dan mentioned on the history of the scientific journal
Why did eLife launch? What did it offer that other journals didn’t?
Nature’s recently proposed $11k article processing fee proposal
eLife’s new “author-driven publishing” approach, in which all submitted papers have to be posted as preprints
Part two of our conversation will be released on January 4, 2021 …”