Open Access for Monographs: Small Steps along a difficult Path | ZBW MediaTalk

“While a considerable proportion of journal articles are now available in open access, only a few scientific monographs are currently openly accessible. Recently, however, more activities have been started and a number of reports have been published. We spoke with Olaf Siegert about the state of open access for monographs and about the activities of libraries….”

Taking a Big Bite Out of the Big Deal – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Unsub is the game-changing data analysis service that is helping librarians forecast, explore, and optimize their alternatives to the Big Deal. Unsub (known as Unpaywall Journals until just this week) supports librarians in making independent assessments of the value of their journal subscriptions relative to price paid rather than relying upon publisher-provided data alone. Librarians breaking away from the Big Deal often credit Unsub as a critical component of their strategy. I am grateful to Heather Piwowar and Jason Priem, co-founders of Our Research, a small nonprofit organization with an innocuous sounding name that is the provider of Unsub, for taking time to answer some questions for the benefit of the readers of The Scholarly Kitchen. …”

ENVRI Open Science Trek – Data Marketplace – YouTube

“Let’s talk Open Science!

In this Star Trek inspired video, we interview Wouter Los who shares his idea of Data Marketplace. To explain what is meant by Data Marketplace and why is it needed, he uses an analogy of competing starships, that end up in agreeing on sharing data. How can competition and data sharing become harmonized? Why do we need Open science? How would a data marketplace look like? Why is this relevant for Earth science? Come, ask and comment here on Youtube or on @ENVRIcomm Twitter channel using #OpenScienceTrek hashtag. The ENVRI community open science fleet is powered by ENVRI-FAIR project. ENVRI-FAIR has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 824068….”

An interview with Dr Rose Harris-Birtill from the Open Library of Humanities | Open Access | University of Groningen Library | University of Groningen

“The Open Library of Humanities, or OLH, is an open access publisher dedicated to publishing peer-reviewed open access scholarship in the humanities, based at Birkbeck, University of London. We’re a scholar-led, not-for-profit publisher and all of our 28 academic journals are both free to read and free to access, with no article processing charges. Our mission is to support and extend open access to scholarship in the humanities – for free, for everyone, for ever.

The OLH model was established to spread the costs of open access publishing fairly and collectively. Initially funded by grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and from OpenAIRE, part of the European Commission, the OLH is funded by an international consortium of libraries and institutions which each contribute an annual membership. Rates are banded according to the institution’s size, and are kept low to ensure affordability, while smaller institutions pay less.

We’re incredibly grateful to our supporters for their help; as a supporting institution, the University of Groningen is part of an international community of nearly 300 supporters from 18 countries. Each of our supporters plays an invaluable part in keeping the OLH working – so a huge thank you to the University of Groningen from us all at OLH. Each supporting member is entitled to a voting position on the Library Governance board, with the ability to vote on the inclusion of new journals, allowing the OLH to be collaboratively governed by its supporters….”

Q&A With Cynthia Willett and Julie Willett: Open Access and Engaging in Global Conversations | Authors Alliance

“As a part of our series of open access success stories that spotlight noteworthy openly accessible books and their authors, we’re featuring Cynthia Willett, Professor of Philosophy at Emory University and Julie Willett, Associate Professor at Texas Tech University….

Authors Alliance: Can you tell us why you opted to make Uproarious openly available?

 

Cynthia Willett & Julie Willett: Our reconceptualization of humor draws from feminist stand-ups and other post-9/11-era comics. Just as our claims are driven by popular culture, we think open access too helps us engage in global conversations. In an era with the fortunes of academics and educational institutions caught up in growing social inequality, we also hope that open access allows our research to be more accessible not only to students at elite institutions but also to those who lack resources yet often drive the conversations on trending fields like humor….

CW & JW: Perhaps the most unexpected result has been the contacts and conversations we are having with stand-up comedians who help us think about the new directions for this field of study. We have also enjoyed wider interest for our work from the media, including an interview on Free Speech TV….”

Elsevier Exit: Q&A with Florida State University about their Big Deal Cancellation(s) – SPARC

“Florida State University (FSU) lost access to its Elsevier content in March 2019, following cancellation of its $2 million Big Deal contract. However, Elsevier was not their first Big Deal cancellation. FSU had previously canceled their Springer Big Deal in 2016, and so went into their Elsevier negotiations knowing that these negotiations could result in similar outcomes. Elsevier cautioned FSU to prepare to spend a $1 million dollars for tokens and pay-per-view access to content. 

Here’s what really happened, and a snapshot of the hard work that went into their bold decision.

The following is a Q&A with Gale Etschmaier, Dean of University Libraries (FSU), and her negotiations team: Valerie Boulos (Associate Dean, Resource Management & Discovery Services), Roy Ziegler (Associate Director for Collection Development), and Jean Phillips (Associate Dean of Libraries for Technology and Digital Scholarship). All were heavily involved in the “Elsevier Exit.” Roy was instrumental in establishing outreach strategies to campus stakeholders, transparently communicating their data analysis to faculty and liaison librarians. Jean and Valerie set up expedited article delivery service, helping FSU establish effective alternative access plans. They also assessed implications for interlibrary loan (ILL), and negotiated the license agreement for 150 new a la carte Elsevier titles after cancellation….”

Open and Shut?: PLOS CEO Alison Mudditt discusses new OA agreement with the University of California

“The Public Library of Science (PLOS) and the University of California (UC) have today announced a two-year agreement designed to make it easier and more affordable for UC researchers to publish in the non-profit open-access publisher’s suite of seven journals.

Under the agreement – which is planned to go into effect this Spring – UC Libraries will automatically pay the first $1,000 of the article processing charge (APC) incurred when UC authors choose to publish in a PLOS journal.

 

Authors who do not have research funds available can request UC Libraries pay the full APC fee. The aim is to ensure that lack of research funds does not present a barrier for UC authors wishing to publish with PLOS.

 

The pilot is intended to test whether an institutional participation model that leverages multiple funding sources, rather than only grant funds, can provide a sustainable and inclusive path to full open access.

 

Below PLOS CEO Alison Mudditt discusses the new agreement and addresses some of the issues that the current trend for universities and consortia to sign so-called transformative agreements with legacy publishers raises for native open-access publishers like PLOS….”

Open and Shut?: PLOS CEO Alison Mudditt discusses new OA agreement with the University of California

“The Public Library of Science (PLOS) and the University of California (UC) have today announced a two-year agreement designed to make it easier and more affordable for UC researchers to publish in the non-profit open-access publisher’s suite of seven journals.

Under the agreement – which is planned to go into effect this Spring – UC Libraries will automatically pay the first $1,000 of the article processing charge (APC) incurred when UC authors choose to publish in a PLOS journal.

 

Authors who do not have research funds available can request UC Libraries pay the full APC fee. The aim is to ensure that lack of research funds does not present a barrier for UC authors wishing to publish with PLOS.

 

The pilot is intended to test whether an institutional participation model that leverages multiple funding sources, rather than only grant funds, can provide a sustainable and inclusive path to full open access.

 

Below PLOS CEO Alison Mudditt discusses the new agreement and addresses some of the issues that the current trend for universities and consortia to sign so-called transformative agreements with legacy publishers raises for native open-access publishers like PLOS….”

Are you an iOS user? Access scientific articles in your device without hitting a paywall – CORE

“Another year has passed and left a lot of good news, investigations and developments for CORE. Today we would like to tell you about one of them – Open Access (OA) Helper, an application developed for iOS mobile devices by Claus Wolf. We asked Claus to tell us how he came up with the OA Helper and here is what he answered….”