A look at prediction markets | Research Information

“Assessing the quality of research is difficult. Jisc and the University of Bristol are partnering to develop a tool that may help institutions improve this process.  

To attract government funding for their crucial research, UK universities are largely reliant on good ratings from the Research Excellent Framework (REF) – a process of expert review designed to assess the quality of research outputs. REF scores determine how much government funding will be allocated to their research projects. For instance, research that is world-leading in terms of originality, significance and rigour, will be scored higher than research that is only recognised nationally. 
 
Considerable time is spent by universities trying to figure out which research outputs will be rated highest (4*) on quality and impact. The recognised ‘gold standard’ for this process is close reading by a few internal academics, but this is time-consuming, onerous, and subject to the relatively limited perspective of just a few people.  …

Prediction markets capture the ‘wisdom of crowds’ by asking large numbers of people to bet on outcomes of future events – in this case how impactful a research project will be in the next REF assessment. It works a bit like the stock market, except that, instead of buying and selling shares in companies, participants buy and sell virtual shares online that will pay out if a particular event occurs – for instance, if a paper receives a 3* or above REF rating.  …”

REF Assistant, Goldsmiths, University of London

“We are seeking a REF Assistant to join the Online Research Collections team at Goldsmiths, University of London to provide valuable support to Goldsmiths’ REF 2021 submission. The successful candidate will work closely with REF Project Officers and Open Access Advisor to organise research outputs for REF 2021. You will be responsible for adding, editing and reviewing metadata of items on Goldsmiths Research Online (GRO), our institutional Open Access repository. You will help gather information on Open Access compliance for REF 2021. As a highly organised individual, you will help produce practice research outputs and collate material for the final REF submission. The post will require you to communicate effectively, confidently and clearly with academics and professional services staff on REF 2021, Open Access and Goldsmiths Research Online….”

Promoting openness – Research Professional News

“Of the potential solutions, open research practices are among the most promising. The argument is that transparency acts as an implicit quality control process. If others are able to scrutinise our work—not just the final published output, but the underlying data, code, and so on—researchers will be incentivised to ensure these are high quality.

So, if we think that research could benefit from improved quality control, and if we think that open research might have a role to play in this, why aren’t we all doing it? In a word: incentives….”

Open Access Monographs in the UK: A data analysis

“One of the key challenges of open access book publishing is determining who pays. As pointed out in section 9, and also by Eve et al. (2017), library funding alone would not be sufficient to support a shift to OA books under an immediate OA model; this would bring about undue pressures on library budgets, resulting in sector inequalities (particularly regarding for institutions that do not receive a large amount of QR funding). As could be seen from the sample in section 8, a significant proportion of publisher revenue for UK REF books also comes from non-UK HEIs. In addition, researchers clearly indicated in the survey that they do not want to be limited in their choice of publisher from any country in the world, and publishers are eager to continue to enjoy their entrepreneurial freedom….”

Open access and monographs evidence review

This report presents new evidence on academic book publishing in the UK, and puts forward a set of stakeholder recommendations to be considered as part of the UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) and Research Excellence Framework (REF) Open Access reviews.

 

The report has been published by the Universities UK (UUK) Open Access Monographs Group. A data analysis of Open Access books in the UK, carried out by fullstopp GmbH and supported by Research England and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (both part of UK Research and Innovation), Jisc and the British Academy, has also been published alongside the UUK report.  

The UUK report draws on a quantitative analysis of the current landscape of long-form publications in the higher education sector, and its engagement with more than 90 organisations at two events,  including publishers, learned societies, subject associations and research libraries….”

REF should accommodate more diverse outputs, says study | Times Higher Education (THE)

“The UK’s research excellence framework should evolve to support the growing diversity of scholarly outputs, a major report says.

The study by consultants Rand Europe, who were commissioned by Research England to consider how research assessment might need to evolve over the next decade, draws on a survey of 3,768 academics in England.

 

It says that, while scholars currently produce an average of 4.7 different types of research output, this is likely to increase to 6.5 over the next decade, with 65 per cent of respondents saying that they expected to produce a greater diversity of output.

Respondents said that the three most dominant forms of output were likely to remain journal articles, conference contributions and book chapters. But many mentioned other types of content that they expected to produce more of in future: for example, website content, openly published peer reviews and research reports for external bodies….”

REF should accommodate more diverse outputs, says study | Times Higher Education (THE)

“The UK’s research excellence framework should evolve to support the growing diversity of scholarly outputs, a major report says.

The study by consultants Rand Europe, who were commissioned by Research England to consider how research assessment might need to evolve over the next decade, draws on a survey of 3,768 academics in England.

 

It says that, while scholars currently produce an average of 4.7 different types of research output, this is likely to increase to 6.5 over the next decade, with 65 per cent of respondents saying that they expected to produce a greater diversity of output.

Respondents said that the three most dominant forms of output were likely to remain journal articles, conference contributions and book chapters. But many mentioned other types of content that they expected to produce more of in future: for example, website content, openly published peer reviews and research reports for external bodies….”

REF Project Officer, Goldsmiths, University of London

“This post is based in the Library within the Online Research Collections team who manage and organise Goldsmiths research outputs via Goldsmiths Research Online and Goldsmiths Journals Online. This post will work alongside another REF Project Officer and REF Project Assistant to prepare Goldsmiths research outputs for submission to REF2021 and report to the Online Research Collections Manager.

The successful candidate will have excellent organisational skills and will be required to review, edit and enter metadata for research outputs, gather information on Open Access compliance, advise and assist academics who produce Practice Research, produce reports and communicate effectively to a variety of stakeholders.”

Preprints are valid research outputs for REF2021 – ASAPbio

“In conversations about preprints in the UK, the question is often raised: ‘are preprints included in REF?’ In brief: yes. This is most likely to be applicable for any research manuscript that is prepared close to the REF2021 submission deadline, and is deemed to be amongst your best work in the current cycle, but which would otherwise not be eligible for REF2021 due to not having time to be published in a journal before the deadline.

The Research Excellence Framework (or REF) is the exercise the UK higher education funding bodies undertake periodically to assess UK research institutions for excellence and impact of research outputs. The REF scores determine allocation of approximately £2bn/year national funding for research, so REF is a major driver of UK institutional policy and researcher behaviour.  Learn more about REF at the end of the post.

Below, we describe how preprints can be included in REF submissions, with extracts from the official REF guidance. …”