Preprints are valid research outputs for REF2021 – ASAPbio

“In conversations about preprints in the UK, the question is often raised: ‘are preprints included in REF?’ In brief: yes. This is most likely to be applicable for any research manuscript that is prepared close to the REF2021 submission deadline, and is deemed to be amongst your best work in the current cycle, but which would otherwise not be eligible for REF2021 due to not having time to be published in a journal before the deadline.

The Research Excellence Framework (or REF) is the exercise the UK higher education funding bodies undertake periodically to assess UK research institutions for excellence and impact of research outputs. The REF scores determine allocation of approximately £2bn/year national funding for research, so REF is a major driver of UK institutional policy and researcher behaviour.  Learn more about REF at the end of the post.

Below, we describe how preprints can be included in REF submissions, with extracts from the official REF guidance. …”

How do monographs fit with the open access agenda? | Jisc

In the UK, the push towards open access (OA) monograph publishing dates back to at least 2013. That was the year the Wellcome Trust included monographs and book chapters in its OA policy and the former higher education funding body for England, HEFCE, posed a number of questions relating to open access monographs in its Research Excellence Frameworkconsultation….”

How do monographs fit with the open access agenda? | Jisc

In the UK, the push towards open access (OA) monograph publishing dates back to at least 2013. That was the year the Wellcome Trust included monographs and book chapters in its OA policy and the former higher education funding body for England, HEFCE, posed a number of questions relating to open access monographs in its Research Excellence Frameworkconsultation….”

Goldsmiths conference: ‘OA mandates will damage academic freedom’ | The Bookseller

“Academics in the arts, humanities and social sciences (AHSS) voiced concerns that Open Access mandates will damage academic freedom at a conference held at Goldsmiths, University of London, on Friday (24th May). The conference heard that widening the funder Open Access mandates developed for STEM subjects to cover the humanities fields would actively prevent some researchers from publishing, because they would not have access to funds.

A push has been initiated in the UK to require all monographs to be published Open Access to be eligible for the 2027 Research Excellence Framework (REF). Meanwhile under international initiative Plan S, all government-funded research will have to be published Open Access from 2020.

Sarah Kember, professor of new technologies of communication at Goldsmiths and director of Goldsmiths Press, suggested that funder-mandated OA publishing – as opposed to scholar-led OA initiatives such as Goldsmiths Press – could narrow the range of work appearing and damage diversity. …”

A Fast-Track Route to Open Access | Unlocking Research

“By simply knowing what sort of manuscript has been uploaded much of the decision and archiving process can be automated. …

Agents therefore need only make one decision: identify the file version. …

Since launching Fast Track the average time to process a manuscript is 1-2 minutes. …”

A Fast-Track Route to Open Access | Unlocking Research

“By simply knowing what sort of manuscript has been uploaded much of the decision and archiving process can be automated. …

Agents therefore need only make one decision: identify the file version. …

Since launching Fast Track the average time to process a manuscript is 1-2 minutes. …”

Study quantifies the growing traction of open access

Now an analysis shows that researchers in the UK are indeed posting their papers online earlier, as are their colleagues all over the world. The time researchers are taking to post papers online shrunk by an average of 472 days per country between 2013 and 2017, finds a study published on 17 April and to be presented at the ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries in June. Though the authors can’t definitively say what’s behind the trend, they suggest that the Research England policy and other funding eligibility requirements recently announced worldwide are pushing academics to rapidly make their work freely available….”

Do Authors Deposit on Time? Tracking Open Access Policy Compliance – Open Research Online

Abstract:  Recent years have seen fast growth in the number of policies mandating Open Access (OA) to research outputs. We conduct a large-scale analysis of over 800 thousand papers from repositories around the world published over a period of 5 years to investigate: a) if the time lag between the date of publication and date of deposit in a repository can be effectively tracked across thousands of repositories globally, and b) if introducing deposit deadlines is associated with a reduction of time from acceptance to open public availability of research outputs. We show that after the introduction of the UK REF 2021 OA policy, this time lag has decreased significantly in the UK and that the policy introduction might have accelerated the UK’s move towards immediate OA compared to other countries. This supports the argument for the inclusion of a time-limited deposit requirement in OA policies.

REF must ‘bring hammer down’ on open access books, says professor | Times Higher Education (THE)

It is time to “bring the hammer down” and extend open access requirements for the UK’s research excellence framework to monographs, a professor has said.

Cameron Neylon, professor of research communication at Australia’s Curtin University, said that he was “running out of sympathy” for academics who complained that there was not enough time to prepare for the requirement that long-form scholarly works must be made available easily and free of charge, if they are to be submitted to the 2027 assessment….

While open access monographs was a complicated issue that was “the price of being the leader”, he said. “Leadership requires taking risks. If everyone was comfortable all the time, what would be the point?” “