New COVID-19 Legal Database | O’Neill Institute

“Launching today, the COVID-19 Law Lab initiative gathers and shares legal documents from over 190 countries across the world to help states establish and implement strong legal frameworks to manage the pandemic. The goal is to ensure that laws protect the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities and that they adhere to international human rights standards.

The new Lab (at www.COVIDLawLab.org) is a joint project of United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the World Health Organization (WHO), the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University….”

Homepage | COVID-19 response

“This website provides a space for the global statistical community to share guidance, actions, tools and best practices to ensure the operational continuity of data programmes by National Statistical Offices, and to address issues of open and timely access to critical data needed by governments and all sectors of society to respond to the global COVID-19 crisis….”

COVID-19 – when data save lives | UN DESA | United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

“To pull all these diverse efforts together, the UN DESA Statistics Division, in collaboration with the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data and Open Data Watch, has launched a new website dedicated to showcasing the official statistics community’s response to the COVID?19 crisis.

The website offers a space for statisticians and data experts to share guidance, actions, tools and best practices to ensure the operational continuity of key data programmes by National Statistical Offices, and to address issues of open and timely access to critical data needed by governments and all sectors of society….”

U.N. agency says coronavirus emergency could trump some patent rights – Reuters

“Francis Gurry, director-general of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), said that during an emergency, health and safety “trumps everything”.

World Health Organization (WHO) director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said on Monday that he backed a proposal by Costa Rica’s President Carlos Alvarado to “create a pool of rights to tests, medicines and vaccines, with free access or licensing on reasonable and affordable terms for all countries”….”

Open Scholarship as a mechanism for the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

Abstract:  Traditional methods of scholarly publishing and communication are ineffective in meeting the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has demonstrated that, in times of need, the global research community can activate and pool its knowledge and resources to collaborate on solving problems. The use of innovative Web-based technologies, including open source software, data-sharing archives, open collaboration methods, and the liberation of thousands of relevant research articles from proprietary sources show us that the fundamental components of a fully open system are readily available, technologically efficient and cost-effective. If we are to achieve the SDGs by 2030, systematic reform and explicit adoption of open scholarship strategies at scale is necessary. We propose that the United Nations and parallel entities take a position of leadership by creating or funding an organisation or federated alliance of organisations to implement these reforms.

Open Science for the implementation of the UN 2030 Agenda

“The background: The first United Nations Open Science Conference was organized by the UN Dag Hammarskjöld Library in collaboration with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) in November 19, 2019 in the UN Headquarters in New York. The theme of the conference, “Towards Global Open Science: Core Enabler of the UN 2030 Agenda”,  aimed into elevating the discussion about open science and open research to the global level and to examine the role of open science in advancing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. 

The conference brought together representatives of open science initiatives from around the world (OpenAIRE, Hindawi, LA Referencia, Scielo, AfricanLII and others), early career researchers, library directors and policymakers….”

Open Science for the implementation of the UN 2030 Agenda

“The background: The first United Nations Open Science Conference was organized by the UN Dag Hammarskjöld Library in collaboration with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) in November 19, 2019 in the UN Headquarters in New York. The theme of the conference, “Towards Global Open Science: Core Enabler of the UN 2030 Agenda”,  aimed into elevating the discussion about open science and open research to the global level and to examine the role of open science in advancing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. 

The conference brought together representatives of open science initiatives from around the world (OpenAIRE, Hindawi, LA Referencia, Scielo, AfricanLII and others), early career researchers, library directors and policymakers….”

Lancet editor-in-chief calls for ‘activist’ journals | Times Higher Education (THE)

“Academic journals must become more “activist” if they are to survive, seeking to “change the direction of society” rather than “passively waiting” for manuscripts, according to the editor-in-chief of The Lancet.

The medical journal is one of a number of titles now explicitly committed to helping pursue the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which range from eradicating hunger to reducing inequalities, as titles try to carve out a new role in a world where publishing has moved online….

Instead of “sitting in our office passively waiting for manuscripts to be submitted to the journal”, Dr Horton said, The Lancet, founded in 1823, now had a mission to “gather the very best scientific evidence, [and] to then think strategically about how that evidence fits within the overall trajectory of scientific and political policy in the world”.

For example, last year the journal published a report setting out how to eradicate malaria by 2050, backed by research funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

This was one of dozens of “commissions” initiated by the journal, which bring together experts to formulate proposals on subjects ranging from defeating Alzheimer’s disease to reforming medical education for the 21st century….

Still, some journals have faced long-standing criticism that their subscription costs mean they are unaffordable for readers in developing countries – or conversely, that the price of publishing an open-access article excludes scholars from poorer university systems.

Some publishers offer discounts to academics in poorer countries. The Lancet, for example, waives open-access publishing fees for scholars whose main funder is based in a state with a low human development index….”

Towards Global Open Science: Core Enabler of the UN 2030 Agenda

“You are cordially invited to attend the first United Nations Open Science Conference on 19 November 2019, organized by the UN Dag Hammarskjöld Library in collaboration with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC). 

The theme of the conference is “Towards Global Open Science: Core Enabler of the UN 2030 Agenda”.  With a desire to elevate the discussion about open science and open research to the global level and to examine the role of open science in advancing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the conference will bring together representatives of open science initiatives (OpenAIRE, Hindawi, LA Referencia, AfricanLII and others), early career researchers, library directors and policymakers.

In the following pages, you will find the concept note, detailed programme, social media hashtag, and more. Please use the blue button above to register should you wish to attend in person, as space is limited. The conference will also be webcast, and you can watch it live on UN WebTV….”

WHO joins coalition for free digital access to health research

“Today, WHO announces it is the first of the United Nations agencies to join a coalition of research funders and charitable foundations (cOAlition S), an initiative to make full and immediate open access to research publications a reality.  cOAlition S is built around Plan S, which consists of 10 principles to ensure that the results from publicly-funded research, must be published in Open Access Journals, on Open Access Platforms, or made immediately available through Open Access Repositories without embargo. …”