Elsevier endorses Leiden Manifesto to guide its development of improved research evaluation

“Elsevier, a global leader in research publishing and information analytics, today announced that it is endorsing the Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics, ten principles that guide best practice in metrics-based research assessment.

The Leiden Manifesto is a set of practical and action-oriented recommendations for those engaged in the evaluation of research, whether in the role of evaluator, those being evaluated, or those responsible for designing and delivering research metrics and indicators. Elsevier, working through its recently-launched International Center for the Study of Research (ICSR), will now strive to develop its research evaluation tools and services aligned with the recommendations of the Leiden Manifesto….”

Elsevier endorses Leiden Manifesto to guide its development of improved research evaluation

“Elsevier, a global leader in research publishing and information analytics, today announced that it is endorsing the Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics, ten principles that guide best practice in metrics-based research assessment.

The Leiden Manifesto is a set of practical and action-oriented recommendations for those engaged in the evaluation of research, whether in the role of evaluator, those being evaluated, or those responsible for designing and delivering research metrics and indicators. Elsevier, working through its recently-launched International Center for the Study of Research (ICSR), will now strive to develop its research evaluation tools and services aligned with the recommendations of the Leiden Manifesto….”

MIT, guided by open access principles, ends Elsevier negotiations | MIT News

“Standing by its commitment to provide equitable and open access to scholarship, MIT has ended negotiations with Elsevier for a new journals contract. Elsevier was not able to present a proposal that aligned with the principles of the MIT Framework for Publisher Contracts. 

Developed by the MIT Libraries in collaboration with the Ad Hoc Task Force on Open Access to MIT’s Research and the Committee on the Library System in October 2019, the MIT Framework is grounded in the conviction that openly sharing research and educational materials is key to the Institute’s mission of advancing knowledge and bringing that knowledge to bear on the world’s greatest challenges. It affirms the overarching principle that control of scholarship and its dissemination should reside with scholars and their institutions, and aims to ensure that scholarly research outputs are openly and equitably available to the broadest possible audience, while also providing valued services to the MIT community. …”

Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion in Scholarly Communications

“The Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion in Scholarly Communications was founded by 10 trade and professional associations that represent organizations and individuals working in scholarly communications. The Coalition was formed to discuss and address issues of diversity and inclusion within our industry.

A number of surveys in recent years have shed light on the lack of diversity in scholarly communications.  From issues of gender equality to the noticeable lack of ethnic diversity in our workforce, there is an increasing awareness that, as an industry, we are not a model of inclusivity. Publishing is truly a global enterprise yet that diversity is not reflected in our collective demographics….”

Transparency and open science principles… | Wellcome Open Research

Abstract:  Background: “Open science” is an umbrella term describing various aspects of transparent and open science practices. The adoption of practices at different levels of the scientific process (e.g., individual researchers, laboratories, institutions) has been rapidly changing the scientific research landscape in the past years, but their uptake differs from discipline to discipline. Here, we asked to what extent journals in the field of sleep research and chronobiology encourage or even require following transparent and open science principles in their author guidelines.

Methods: We scored the author guidelines of a comprehensive set of 28 sleep and chronobiology journals, including the major outlets in the field, using the standardised Transparency and Openness (TOP) Factor. This instrument rates the extent to which journals encourage or require following various aspects of open science, including data citation, data transparency, analysis code transparency, materials transparency, design and analysis guidelines, study pre-registration, analysis plan pre-registration, replication, registered reports, and the use of open science badges.
Results: Across the 28 journals, we find low values on the TOP Factor (median [25th, 75th percentile] 2.5 [1, 3], min. 0, max. 9, out of a total possible score of 28) in sleep research and chronobiology journals.
Conclusions: Our findings suggest an opportunity for sleep research and chronobiology journals to further support the recent developments in transparent and open science by implementing transparency and openness principles in their guidelines and making adherence to them mandatory.

FAIRsFAIR Invites Endorsement of TRUST Principles | FAIRsFAIR

“FAIRsFAIR is inviting digital repositories and associated organisations to endorse the TRUST Principles for digital repositories. The TRUST Principles, developed within the RDA Community and recently published in the Nature Research journal Scientific Data, offer guidance for maintaining the trustworthiness of digital repositories, especially those responsible for the stewardship of research data….”

MIT Terminates Elsevier Contract Over Open Access Dispute

“In an unprecedented move last year, the University of California system terminated journal negotiations with Elsevier over open access issues and higher costs. Last month MIT did the same, saying the publisher’s proposal did not align with the MIT Framework for Publisher Contracts. The UC system includes more than 280,000 students and over 227,000 faculty staff. MIT has roughly 24,000 students, faculty and staff in its system.

Developed in 2019, MIT’s Framework creates a mechanism to ensure research is freely and immediately available, while recognizing that the value in published papers lies with the authors and institutions that support them. Since it’s debut, more than 100 institutions have endorsed the MIT Framework in recognition of its potential to advance open scholarship….”

The TRUST Principles for digital repositories | Scientific Data

“As information and communication technology has become pervasive in our society, we are increasingly dependent on both digital data and repositories that provide access to and enable the use of such resources. Repositories must earn the trust of the communities they intend to serve and demonstrate that they are reliable and capable of appropriately managing the data they hold.

Following a year-long public discussion and building on existing community consensus1, several stakeholders, representing various segments of the digital repository community, have collaboratively developed and endorsed a set of guiding principles to demonstrate digital repository trustworthiness. Transparency, Responsibility, User focus, Sustainability and Technology: the TRUST Principles provide a common framework to facilitate discussion and implementation of best practice in digital preservation by all stakeholders….”

The TRUST Principles for digital repositories | Scientific Data

“As information and communication technology has become pervasive in our society, we are increasingly dependent on both digital data and repositories that provide access to and enable the use of such resources. Repositories must earn the trust of the communities they intend to serve and demonstrate that they are reliable and capable of appropriately managing the data they hold.

Following a year-long public discussion and building on existing community consensus1, several stakeholders, representing various segments of the digital repository community, have collaboratively developed and endorsed a set of guiding principles to demonstrate digital repository trustworthiness. Transparency, Responsibility, User focus, Sustainability and Technology: the TRUST Principles provide a common framework to facilitate discussion and implementation of best practice in digital preservation by all stakeholders….”

Modeling the Future for Open Scholarship – Call for interviews – Google Docs

“Universities and colleges leaders have an opportunity — and an obligation — to build a plan today that addresses strains on existing infrastructure and also looks to the future needs to support its students, researchers, and faculty. That calls for thinking through what a “preparedness” model looks like for higher education and research writ large, one that takes into account the economic implications on the university itself as well as on the services and enterprises it relies on, like publishing and data management infrastructures. …

We propose the creation of a coordinated, cross-institutional “preparedness plan”, in partnership with Invest in Open Infrastructure (IOI), to begin work on identifying the opportunities, leverage points, costs and approaches that could be employed to enable the following: 

Creation of shared set of principles to help assess solutions based on a values-based framework;

Support that addresses heightened demands on universities as they shift operations online and transform the way they serve their communities;

Coordinated scenario planning that plans for a radical shift towards open scholarship and a convergence on existing, open tools and services;

Ways to pool resources and risk to maximize cost-effectiveness and minimize system failure; 

Creation of a shared action plan to facilitate coordinated decision-making ensuring research continuity;

Bolster researcher productivity, continuity, and growth in both the near and long-term. …

 

Call for University Participation. We are currently seeking university representatives to join us as key participants in this work. Representatives should be able to provide information about the realities abilities at their university, and could consist of roles including, but not limited to university librarians, program directors, technology leads, Vice Provosts, and Deans. Participants will need to be able to speak to budget and programmatic decisions within their department and be able to provide insight to other changes at their Institution.”