Fair Open Access Alliance

“The mission of the foundation is

a. to promote and support initiatives concerning (Fair) Open Access publications in the broadest sense;

b. to acquire resources and financially sustain (Fair) Open Access publications;

c. to support foundations financially and otherwise in various disciplines (xxxOA’s) that pursue the same goals;

d. to expand the Open Library of Humanities to other disciplines.

e. to propagate and promote the principles of Fair Open Access over all disciplines of science. “

Libraries Face a Future of Open Access – The Scholarly Kitchen

“When librarians prepare for a negotiation, they now routinely reach for the muscle. At least that’s how I read the news about the Swedish library consortium and its dealings with Elsevier. If you have been too preoccupied with the Royal Wedding to pay attention to news coming out of the world of STM publishing, you can get a good backgrounder here. Briefly, the Swedish consortium attempted to dictate terms to Elsevier, terms that Elsevier would not accept. The result is that Elsevier’s contract will be cancelled, meaning that there will be no authorized access to Elsevier content for the consortium users.

I have written previously about how the current landscape looks to publishers. In every negotiation, publishers are mindful that their ability to control access to their publications is compromised by unauthorized access from such sites as Sci-Hub and ResearchGate. How can Elsevier or any publisher shut off the Swedes or the Germans when Alexandra Elbakyan is waiting in the anteroom? Librarians have learned to reach for the muscle and now confidently demand terms that no publisher can or will accept. This raises the obvious question of whether librarians knowingly and actively seek the support of copyright pirates; or perhaps librarians simply are going about their business in their usual upbeat way, working diligently to make the world a better place, and the critical involvement of the shady characters is neither sought nor recognized. My own view has changed. I think the cynicism quotient in academic libraries, measured against other organizations and institutions, is very low. This is not, after all, Wall Street or, lord help us, the telecommunications business. But, like the populist governments that have now been installed in a number of Western democracies, the party of cynicism has taken control of some leading library organizations. Thus a nod to the likes of Luca Brasi no longer seems out of line. Having grown up in New Jersey, I have some qualms about what it means for anyone to form an alliance with unsavory characters. What do you do when they ask for a favor in return?

So it’s about time to consider what happens if the libraries win. By “win” I mean they refuse deals with publishers and turn their constituencies over to unauthorized sites. This will save them huge amounts of money, of course, money that they would surely like to put to other uses. Publishing is an ecosystem, however, and a significant change in one element can ripple across the entire field. If Sci-Hub becomes the default place to go for full-text content, what else will change?

…”

KU Leuven supports a fair approach to scholarly publishing – Open Access Belgium

“KU Leuven launches the KU Leuven Fund for Fair Open Access, enabling the publication of scholarly books and articles in a way that is cost-effective, puts academics back in charge and benefits the public at large. For many years now, opposition against a commercial approach towards scholarly publishing has been growing stronger and stronger. The for-profit model leads to publications which are prohibitively expensive, either for the reader or for the researcher, and typically puts commercial partners in control of the dissemination of scholarly work since researchers have to transfer critical aspects of their author’s rights in order to get published. Alternatives such as Green Open Access (whereby researchers make an archival copy of their publication freely available to all), in most fields, do not challenge the traditional commercial publication model enough. Therefore, another alternative is on the rise, namely Fair Open Access. Publications in Fair Open Access are immediately freely available to all, are produced according to cost-effective (rather than commercial) principles and guarantee full control of researchers over the entire publication process. KU Leuven has been supporting Green Open Access for many years already, and now intensifies its efforts to maximize scholarly exchange, collaboration and innovation by creating the KU Leuven Fund for Fair Open Access, administered by KU Leuven Libraries. This fund provides financial support for the production costs of books published by Leuven University Press as well as articles in selected journals, on the condition that these journals are published according to the Fair Open Access model and maintain the highest academic standards. More information and application forms can be found here.”

UKRI Open Access Principles and High Level Policy

“This statement articulates UK Research and Innovation’s high level policy and common principles around Open Access. These principles reaffirm the open access policies of the REF and the research councils, and will inform the development of UKRI’s policy for Open Access, the UKRI Open Access review and wider UKRI policy development in open research….” 

Linked Research

“Linked Research is an initiative, a movement, and a manifesto. We believe that scholarly communication is stunted by current academic publishing practices, and we aim to promote change for the greater good. This is not something hypothetical or a dream for the future, it is completely possible with today’s technologies. A cultural shift is needed, and Linked Research is here to bring together like-minded people who want to push this forwards.

Linked Research is not biased towards any particular tool or technology; we understand that different researchers and disciplines have different needs and desires around scholarly communication. We encourage the use of any technologies that comply with the Linked Research principles….”

Publish your research in a space you control, on your own terms. You do not need permission to make your work accessible to all….Create unique identifiers for everything you think is important, from data objects to sections of prose, so others can refer to and reuse them….Reuse and link to other research and data so nothing goes to waste or is reinvented. Keep a machine-readable trace of inspirations and derivations….Have an open comments policy so that anyone can review and generate discussion around your work….Reject information silos, paywalls, academic box-ticking, and archaic and artificial barriers. Be the change; publish your research using a free culture license, and openly review the work of others….”

Linked Research

“Linked Research is an initiative, a movement, and a manifesto. We believe that scholarly communication is stunted by current academic publishing practices, and we aim to promote change for the greater good. This is not something hypothetical or a dream for the future, it is completely possible with today’s technologies. A cultural shift is needed, and Linked Research is here to bring together like-minded people who want to push this forwards.

Linked Research is not biased towards any particular tool or technology; we understand that different researchers and disciplines have different needs and desires around scholarly communication. We encourage the use of any technologies that comply with the Linked Research principles….”

Publish your research in a space you control, on your own terms. You do not need permission to make your work accessible to all….Create unique identifiers for everything you think is important, from data objects to sections of prose, so others can refer to and reuse them….Reuse and link to other research and data so nothing goes to waste or is reinvented. Keep a machine-readable trace of inspirations and derivations….Have an open comments policy so that anyone can review and generate discussion around your work….Reject information silos, paywalls, academic box-ticking, and archaic and artificial barriers. Be the change; publish your research using a free culture license, and openly review the work of others….”

Linked Research: An Approach for Scholarly Communication

Abstract:  The future of scholarly communication involves research results, analysis and data all being produced, published, verified and reused interactively on the Web, with ‘papers’ linking to and from each other at a granular level. The academic process of peer review is increasingly becoming open, transparent and decentralised. More broadly, the mechanism for global knowledge sharing is becoming an ongoing conversation between experts, policy makers, implementers, and the general public. This vision is radical, and getting there requires understanding of, and change in, a number of interrelated areas. In this article we break down the problem space and define requirements for advancement towards a Web-based ecosystem for scholarly communication: Linked Research. We discuss our strategy for tackling each of these areas. This includes how we can build on and combine existing well-known technologies and practices for digital publishing, social interactions, decentralised data storage, and semantic data enrichment. We provide an initial assessment of our proposed strategy through an example implementation of tooling which sets out to meet the requirements.

Linked Research: An Approach for Scholarly Communication

Abstract:  The future of scholarly communication involves research results, analysis and data all being produced, published, verified and reused interactively on the Web, with ‘papers’ linking to and from each other at a granular level. The academic process of peer review is increasingly becoming open, transparent and decentralised. More broadly, the mechanism for global knowledge sharing is becoming an ongoing conversation between experts, policy makers, implementers, and the general public. This vision is radical, and getting there requires understanding of, and change in, a number of interrelated areas. In this article we break down the problem space and define requirements for advancement towards a Web-based ecosystem for scholarly communication: Linked Research. We discuss our strategy for tackling each of these areas. This includes how we can build on and combine existing well-known technologies and practices for digital publishing, social interactions, decentralised data storage, and semantic data enrichment. We provide an initial assessment of our proposed strategy through an example implementation of tooling which sets out to meet the requirements.