Encouraging Adherence to Values and Principles in Scholarly Publishing | Educopia Institute

“Through the Next Generation Library Publishing project (2019-2022), Educopia Institute, California Digital Library, and Stratos, in close collaboration with COAR, LYRASIS, and Longleaf Services, seek to improve the publishing pathways and choices available to authors, editors, and readers through strengthening, integrating, and scaling up scholarly publishing infrastructures to support library publishers. In addition to building publishing tools and workflows, our team is exploring how to create community hosting models that align explicitly and demonstratively with academic values. …”

Sharing research data and findings relevant to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak | Wellcome

“We call on researchers, journals and funders to ensure that research findings and data relevant to this outbreak are shared rapidly and openly to inform the public health response and help save lives.

We affirm the commitment to the principles set out in the 2016 Statement on data sharing in public health emergencies, and will seek to ensure that the World Health Organization (WHO) has rapid access to emerging findings that could aid the global response….

Specifically, we commit to work together to help ensure:

all peer-reviewed research publications relevant to the outbreak are made immediately open access, or freely available at least for the duration of the outbreak
research findings relevant to the outbreak are shared immediately with the WHO upon journal submission, by the journal and with author knowledge
research findings are made available via preprint servers before journal publication, or via platforms that make papers openly accessible before peer review, with clear statements regarding the availability of underlying data
researchers share interim and final research data relating to the outbreak, together with protocols and standards used to collect the data, as rapidly and widely as possible – including with public health and research communities and the WHO
authors are clear that data or preprints shared ahead of submission will not pre-empt its publication in these journals….”

The Cornoavirus (COVID-19) outbreak highlights serious deficiencies in scholarly communication | Impact of Social Sciences

“As research and government responses to the COVID-19 outbreak escalate in the face of a global public health crisis, Vincent Larivière, Fei Shu and Cassidy R. Sugimoto reflect on efforts to make research on this subject more widely available. Arguing that a narrow focus on research published in high ranking journals predominantly in English has impeded research efforts, they suggest that the renewed emphasis on carrying out open research on the virus presents an opportunity to reassess how research and scholarly communication systems serve the public good….

The Trump administration in the United States, for example, is considering an executive order that would make all federally funded studies free to read on publication. Similarly, the Plan S coalition of funders require all funded research to be published in open access journals. While many funding agencies have adopted open access policies, compliance is variable and embargoes currently limit immediate access to biomedical research. Both the potential executive order and Plan S have been opposed by many of the signatories on the Wellcome Trust statement. This is a blatant contradiction….”

FAIRsFAIR

“FAIRsFAIR – Fostering Fair Data Practices in Europe – aims to supply practical solutions for the use of the FAIR data principles throughout the research data life cycle. Emphasis is on fostering FAIR data culture and the uptake of good practices in making data FAIR. FAIRsFAIR will play a key role in the development of global standards for FAIR certification of repositories and the data within them contributing to those policies and practices that will turn the EOSC programme into a functioning infrastructure.

In the end, FAIRsFAIR will provide a platform for using and implementing the FAIR principles in the day to day work of European research data providers and repositories. FAIRsFAIR will also deliver essential FAIR dimensions of the Rules of Participation (RoP) and regulatory compliance for participation in the EOSC. The EOSC governance structure will use these FAIR aligned RoPs to establish whether components of the infrastructure function in a FAIR manner….”

Roadmap for Open Science to reduce barriers and speed up discovery – Canada.ca

“Every day, Canadian researchers are coming up with new ideas with the potential to tackle some of the biggest challenges we face today. By freely sharing and collaborating on these innovations, we can ensure a dynamic and transparent research community. The Government of Canada can now bolster its efforts in making federal science open and accessible to all thanks to the Roadmap for Open Science — a set of ten recommendations delivered by Canada’s Chief Science Advisor, Dr. Mona Nemer.

Under the guidance of an expert committee and through feedback received from federal departments, agencies and granting councils, the roadmap articulates overarching principles and recommendations. The principles revolve around people, transparency, inclusiveness, collaborations and sustainability.

By enabling others to build on previously validated research, Open Science will help speed up the pace of new discoveries ranging from small business innovations to new medical treatments with the potential to save lives. It will also foster quality and integrity in research by offering an opportunity for wider evaluation and scrutiny by the scientific community, and build stronger collaborations with Canada’s international colleagues. Open Science is also a means to communicate openly within the research community and with the public to enable greater trust and citizen engagement.

The Roadmap for Open Science corresponds with the Chief Science Advisor’s 2019 commitment to provide advice on the best way to make government-funded science accessible to all, while maintaining respect for privacy, security, ethical considerations and appropriate intellectual property protection….”

The Declaration to Improve Biomedical & Health Research

“3) That all publicly funded research is registered and published in designated Research Repositories The majority of research is funded by public and charitable funds. Yet, huge amounts of research is never published at all, which aside from being an indefensible waste of public money, is a major source of publication bias 3 . Meanwhile, basic research documentation which is essential to ensure appropriate research conduct, such as protocols, are only sometimes available, either on voluntary databases or upon agreement of study authors. The World Health Organization (WHO) has long urged registration of trials in affiliated ‘primary registries’, such as ClinicalTrials.gov 17 and the EU Clinical Trials Register 18 which can all be searched simultaneously a dedicated WHO website 19 . Mandatory registration of trials has improved transparency , although compliance with publication requirements is poor 20 , possibly hampered by problems with the basic functionality of some major registries 21 22 . Even where trials have been registered, usually only very limited information is shared, rather than the full protocols requir ed to really understand study plans. Most researchers don’t work in trials. Some principled scientists do register their work but while this remains voluntary such researc hers are likely to remain a minority . A ll publically funded research, not just trials, comprehensive documentation including protocols , statistical analysis plans, statistical analysis code and raw or appropriately de-identified summary data should be available on a single WHO affiliated repository, designated for that purpose by each state or groups of states . Depositing documentation need not become onerous for researchers and could actually replace much of the overly bureaucratic reporting currently required for funders and ethics committees. Different solutions may exist in different countries. For example, England’s Health Research Authority could develop such a registry 23 , by building on the its existing public databases 24 . Or, through additional national funding and international support existing platforms which promote transparency and accessibility 25 26 27 could be designated for this purpose through collaboration with national research bodies.”

Sharing research data and findings relevant to the novel coronavirus (nCoV) outbreak | Wellcome

“The outbreak of the novel coronavirus in China (2019-nCoV) represents a significant and urgent threat to global health.

We call on researchers, journals and funders to ensure that research findings and data relevant to this outbreak are shared rapidly and openly to inform the public health response and help save lives.

We affirm the commitment to the principles set out in the 2016 Statement on data sharing in public health emergencies, and will seek to ensure that the World Health Organization (WHO) has rapid access to emerging findings that could aid the global response.

Specifically, we commit to work together to help ensure:

all peer-reviewed research publications relevant to the outbreak are made immediately open access, or freely available at least for the duration of the outbreak
research findings relevant to the outbreak are shared immediately with the WHO upon journal submission, by the journal and with author knowledge
research findings are made available via preprint servers before journal publication, or via platforms that make papers openly accessible before peer review, with clear statements regarding the availability of underlying data
researchers share interim and final research data relating to the outbreak, together with protocols and standards used to collect the data, as rapidly and widely as possible – including with public health and research communities and the WHO
authors are clear that data or preprints shared ahead of submission will not pre-empt its publication in these journals…”

Data Summit in Paris | LERU

“The international Research Data Rights Summit was held at Sorbonne University on Monday, 27 January. This initiative brought together nine major networks of research-intensive universities from major regions of the world. It was an opportunity to sign the “Sorbonne Declaration” on the rights of research data. This text strongly affirms the willingness of universities to share their data while firmly calling on governments to adopt a clear legal framework to regulate this sharing and to provide the means to put it in place. …”

Sorbonne declaration on research data rights

Signed by nine major university consortia. 

(The file is an image scan that doesn’t support cutting and pasting. Otherwise, this description would be longer and more useful.)

The declaration is undated, but was officially released on January 27, 2020.