Impact of Social Sciences – Survey findings suggest both individuals and institutions can do more to promote open science practices in India

How much have the open science movement’s practices and principles permeated researcher behaviour and attitudes in India? Arul George ScariaSatheesh Menon and Shreyashi Ray have conducted a survey among researchers working across five different disciplines in India and reveal that more can be done to promote open science within its research institutions. While a majority of respondents believe open science to be important, less than half use open access repositories for sharing publications, with a much smaller fraction using them to share data. Meanwhile, a paucity of simplified and translated versions of scientific papers and continued access problems for those with disabilities are indicative of a research environment that is not as inclusive as it could be.

Scholarly communications shouldn’t just be open, but non-profit too

Much of the rhetoric around the future of scholarly communication hinges on the ‘open’ label. In light of Elsevier’s recent acquisition of bepress and the announcement that, owing to high fees, an established mathematics journal’s editorial team will split from its publisher to start an open access alternative, Jefferson Pooley argues that the scholarly communication ecosystem should aim not only to be open but non-profit too. The profit motive is fundamentally misaligned with core values of academic life, potentially corroding ideals like unfettered inquiry, knowledge-sharing, and cooperative progress. There are obstacles to forging a non-profit alternative, from sustainable funding to entrenched cynicism, but such a goal is worthy and within reach.”

Scholarly communications shouldn’t just be open, but non-profit too

Much of the rhetoric around the future of scholarly communication hinges on the ‘open’ label. In light of Elsevier’s recent acquisition of bepress and the announcement that, owing to high fees, an established mathematics journal’s editorial team will split from its publisher to start an open access alternative, Jefferson Pooley argues that the scholarly communication ecosystem should aim not only to be open but non-profit too. The profit motive is fundamentally misaligned with core values of academic life, potentially corroding ideals like unfettered inquiry, knowledge-sharing, and cooperative progress. There are obstacles to forging a non-profit alternative, from sustainable funding to entrenched cynicism, but such a goal is worthy and within reach.”

Bermuda Principles meet structural biology : Article : Nature Structural & Molecular Biology

“The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC; http://www.thesgconline.org/) is a public-private partnership that places the three-dimensional structures of proteins of relevance to human health into the public domain without restriction on use. Over the past 3 years, the SGC has deposited the structures of more than 550 proteins from its Target List (http://www.thesgconline.org/structures/about.php) into the Protein DataBank (PDB); this accounts for about one-quarter of the new structures of human proteins in the PDB over this period (‘new’ is defined as <95% sequence identity to proteins whose structures were already available in the PDB) and the majority of the new structures from the human parasites that cause malaria, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis. Over the next 4 years, the SGC is committing to determining the structures of another 600 proteins from its Target List, including eight human integral membrane proteins.

The SGC has been releasing the coordinates for all the SGC structures into the PDB immediately after they meet the SGC quality criteria (http://www.thesgconline.org/structures/sgc_structure_criteria.php), even if the ultimate intention is to describe the work in the peer-reviewed literature. This data release policy, which has often meant that coordinates were available for several months before the manuscript was even written, has not limited the ability of our scientists to publish….”

OSM – Open Source Malaria

The Open Source Malaria project is trying a different approach to curing malaria. Guided by open source principles, everything is open and anyone can contribute. 

 

This Landing Page aggregates the most recent activity in Open Source Malaria. Action items are on the To Do List and experiments from all contributors are recorded in the Lab Notebooks. Most current research is on a very promising set of molecules known as Series 4. If you’d like to get involved, go right ahead, or get in touch with a member of the consortium (click on “Join the Team” below). In open source research all data and ideas are freely shared, anyone may participate as an equal partner and there will be no patents – think “Linux for Malaria Research” (FAQ).…”

Ling OA

Open Access publishing is often said to be the future of academic journals, but the actual move from a subscription model to an Open Access model is not easily achieved. Several international linguistics journals are currently moving from their traditional publisher to a new open access publisher, moving their entire editorial staff, authors, and peer reviewers from the traditional subscription model to Fair Open Access.

LingOA facilitates this radical move by paying for the Article Processing charges of the articles published in these journals during the next five years. The journals Glossa, Laboratory Phonology, and Journal of Portuguese Linguistics will be published (online only) by Ubiquity Press, but LingOA will work with any publisher who complies with the above Fair Open Access conditions. To ensure long-term sustainability, LingOA has partnered with the Open Library of Humanities. OLH, whose platform is also provided by Ubiquity Press, will guarantee the continued publication of the journals associated with LingOA after the first five years through its consortial library funding model. OLH is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing Open Access scholarship with no author-facing APCs (www.openlibhums.org). This will provide long-term sustainability for Fair Open Access journals, ensuring that no researcher will ever have to pay for APCs out of their own pocket.

The Open Access publisher has to comply with the following conditions, a.k.a. the Fair Open Access Principles: …”

Fair Open Access Alliance

“We are a group of scholars and librarians aiming to help transform the conventions of scholarly publishing, and return control of the publication process to the scholarly community.

The Fair Open Access Alliance is an overarching organization (formally a Stichting – non profit foundation – in the Netherlands) aimed at coordinating efforts toward sustainable open access scholarly publishing, following the principles of Fair Open Access. Member organizations include

  • LingOA (facilitating conversion to fair open access of journals in linguistics)
  • MathOA (facilitating conversion to fair open access of journals in mathematics)
  • PsyOA (facilitating conversion to fair open access of journals in psychology)
  • Open Library of Humanities (dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges)
  • Center for Open Science (aiming to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of scholarly research)
  • Independent OA journals who have signed up to the Fair Open Access principles (to be listed “soon”)….”

MathOA

MathOA is an organization modelled on LingOA, aimed at facilitating and accelerating the switch to open access publishing in mathematics (broadly interpreted), using the principles of what we call Fair Open Access (more details). To this end, we investigate publishers, obtain guaranteed funding, offer legal help, and generally try to simplify the job of editors in switching their existing subscription journal to a modern, community-controlled OA platform. We have substantial practical experience in running  journals and converting them to open access. MathOA is a member of the Fair Open Access Alliance….”

Journal of Algebraic Combinatorics flips to Fair Open Access

“At the end of June 2017, the four editors-in-chief of the Journal of Algebraic Combinatorics

informed Springer that they will not renew their contracts, which terminate on 31 December 2017.

Nearly all of the editorial board members will also resign, to form the editorial board of a new

journal that will be called Algebraic Combinatorics, run according to Fair Open Access Principles.

The new journal Algebraic Combinatorics will be up and running very shortly, with interim editorsin-chief

Satoshi Murai and Vic Reiner. The transition to Fair Open Access is supported by the

organisation Mathematics in Open Access (MathOA)….”

The Pledge – I support Open Principles for Science and Education for building a better world for everyone | ICA Commission on Open Source Geospatial Technologies

“Please find below the  pledge for  supporting Open Principles for Science and Education for building a better world for everyone .

‘I believe Science is a public good and quality education opportunities should be open and accessible for everyone.

I will work to eliminate the digital divide and contribute to building up Open Knowledge for the benefit of all humanity, with special effort to enlighten future generations.

I contribute my service for the betterment of all humanity using the guiding principles of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in building a better world for everyone.

I will work to advance and increase Open Knowledge for the benefit of all humanity with special consideration of those less fortunate.

I will be a voice for Open Principles in Science and Education and promote this pledge through my networks.’

Thank you for your support.”