New milestones for open access policies at MIT | MIT Libraries News

MIT has reached a new open access milestone: 46 percent of faculty members’ articles published since the OA policy passed in 2009 are now being shared in the Open Access Articles Collection of DSpace@MIT. (Last year, the number was 44 percent.)

Earlier this month, the MIT Libraries celebrated making live in DSpace the first paper to rely on rights retained under the new MIT authors’ opt-in open access license. The license was announced by MIT’s vice president for research, Maria Zuber, in April.

MIT convenes ad hoc task force on open access to Institute’s research | MIT News

“MIT’s provost, in consultation with the vice president for research, the chair of the faculty, and the director of the libraries, has appointed an ad hoc task force on open access to MIT’s research. Convening the task force was one of the 10 recommendations presented in the preliminary report of the Future of Libraries Task Force. The open access task force, chaired by Class of 1922 Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Hal Abelson and Director of Libraries Chris Bourg, will lead an Institute-wide discussion of ways in which current MIT open access policies and practices might be updated or revised to further the Institute’s mission of disseminating the fruits of its research and scholarship as widely as possible….”

Open Documentary Lab at MIT

“In the spirit of MIT’s open courseware and open source software movements, the Open Documentary Lab is inclusive, collaborative and committed to sharing knowledge, networks, and tools. ‘Open’ in its understanding of documentary’s forms and potentials, the Lab is catalyst, partner and guide to the future of reality-based storytelling….”

Full-text mining of MIT thesis content: Help us experiment | MIT Libraries News

“Curious about text mining? So are we! The MIT Libraries is exploring what a text mining service for our thesis collection could look like. What does that mean? Using a simple interface or by building your own tool using an API, you can search and download the full text of theses and dissertations published at MIT, and then use that content for your own further research and analysis.

So we’re building a prototype API to experiment, and here’s where we need you: We want to know more about how researchers might use such a service and what it should include. Do you do full text data mining as part of your research? Do you use other services like this and have opinions about them? Want to help us test our prototype?…”

Voting with our dollars: making a new home for the collections budget in the MIT Libraries

“Under the vision and leadership of new MIT Libraries Associate Director for Collections Greg Eow and Director Chris Bourg, the management of the MIT Libraries collections budget has recently been incorporated into the scholarly communications program. Essentially, the collections budget is now an element under our scholarly communications umbrella….So our efforts in the early months have taken us in the direction of transforming the scholarly communication landscape towards more openness, through a variety of techniques — open access deposits, negotiated rights that allow use in MITx (MOOC) courses, perpetual access to more commercial material, and building local “inside out” collections by spending our collections dollars in new ways….”

Director of Digital Projects

“The Director of Digital Projects will lead an MIT Libraries supported software development program and will develop partnerships with external academic and commercial collaborators to develop tools and platforms with a local and global impact on research, scholarly communications, education, and the preservation of information and ideas. Our goal is nothing short of an open, trusted, durable, interdisciplinary, interoperable content platform that provides a foundation for the entire lifecycle of information for collaborative global research and education….”

Scholarly Communications and Licensing Librarian – Cambridge MA 02139

“Join a newly created, innovative department which incorporates collections resource management under the umbrella of a strong and long-standing scholarly communications program.  Responsibilities include reviewing library content license agreements and carrying out projects related to license interpretation and license metadata; serving as the point person for text-mining of licensed and other scholarly resources; participating on project teams related to open access workflows and assisting with implementing changes to open access workflow systems, including the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy; providing copyright and open access outreach to the MIT community, including teaching workshops, building guides, and writing blog stories; and working on projects that support scholarly publishing, open access, and copyright initiatives….”

This Mongolian Teenager Aced a MOOC. Now He Wants to Widen Their Impact. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

“Free online courses changed the life of one super-smart Mongolian teenager. His name is Battushig Myanganbayar, and four years ago, while he was still a high-school student in Ulan Bator, he took a massive open online course from MIT. It was one of the first they had ever offered, about circuits and electronics, and he was one of about a hundred and forty thousand people to take it. He not only passed, he was one of about three hundred who got a perfect score. He was only 15 years old.

He was hailed in The New York Times and other media outlets as a boy wonder, and soon he got accepted to the real MIT campus. It was a feel-good story that matched the hopeful narrative about MOOCs at the time. These free courses were touted as way to bring top education to underserved communities around the world. The New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman soon wrote that “Nothing has more potential to unlock a billion more brains to solve the world’s biggest problems.” This was the peak of the MOOC hype.

Today, Mr. Myanganbayar remains a fan of MOOCs, but he also has a critique of this knowledge giveaway, and he questions how much good it’s really doing for people in the developing world….”

Open Geoportal | OpenGeoportal.org

“The Open Geoportal (OGP) is a collaboratively developed, open source, federated web application to rapidly discover, preview, and retrieve geospatial data from multiple organizations.  The project is lead by Tufts University along with Harvard and MIT. Several other partner organizations are assisting with the development….”

Campus Open-Access Policy Implementation Models and Implications for IR Services

“As Shannon Kipphut-Smith notes in her summary of Rice University’s implementation experience, libraries faced with the need to set up brand-new procedures find themselves in a “nuanced” environment without a roadmap. Their library, like others implementing policies, “had never before conducted activities similar to the implementation of the OA policy,” so they found that “practically every activity has been experimental.”3 Here, in attempt to build that needed roadmap, we provide a snapshot of the openaccess policy implementation landscape by evaluating data from a survey of Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions (COAPI) and characterizing each library’s OA policy implementation models for its campus. We reflect on implications for services associated with campus institutional repositories (IRs) in 2 meeting implementation needs, identifying relevant IR services that have emerged in relation to, and in support of, each of the implementation models….”