Leveraging Concepts in Open Access Publications

Abstract : This paper addresses the integration of a Named Entity Recognition and Disambiguation (NERD) service within a group of open access (OA) publishing digital platforms and considers its potential impact on both research and scholarly publishing. The software powering this service, called entity-fishing, was initially developed by Inria in the context of the EU FP7 project CENDARI and provides automatic entity recognition and disambiguation using the Wikipedia and Wikidata data sets. The application is distributed with an open-source licence, and it has been deployed as a web service in DARIAH’s infrastructure hosted by the French HumaNum. In the paper, we focus on the specific issues related to its integration on five OA platforms specialized in the publication of scholarly monographs in the social sciences and humanities (SSH), as part of the work carried out within the EU H2020 project HIRMEOS (High Integration of Research Monographs in the European Open Science infrastructure). In the first section, we give a brief overview of the current status and evolution of OA publications, considering specifically the challenges that OA monographs are encountering. In the second part, we show how the HIRMEOS project aims to face these challenges by optimizing five OA digital platforms for the publication of monographs from the SSH and ensuring their interoperability. In sections three and four we give a comprehensive description of the entity-fishing service, focusing on its concrete applications in real use cases together with some further possible ideas on how to exploit the annotations generated. We show that entity-fishing annotations can improve both research and publishing process. In the last chapter, we briefly present further possible application scenarios that could be made available through infrastructural projects.

An interview with the co-founder of Iris.ai – the world’s first Artificial Intelligence science assistant | The Saint

“Have you ever spent hours sifting through journal papers? Ever got frustrated at your inability to find relevant research? Ever wished that there was an easier way to filter the seemingly endless stream of information on the web? The team at Iris.ai certainly did, which is why they have created an AI-powered science assistant to help anyone that wants to find related papers for an original research question. The software – Iris.ai – can be used to build a precise reading list of research documents, and the company claims that it can solve your research problems 78% faster (without compromising quality) than if you were carrying out the tasks manually. The concept for Iris.ai was first established three years ago at NASA Ames Research Centre. The team was taking part in a summer programme run by Singularity University (SU) when they were set the task of creating a concept that would positively affect the lives of a billion people. This exercise got the team thinking about the current state of scientific research, and more specifically about the restrictions created by paywalls, and the inability of human intelligence alone to process the three thousand or so research papers that are published around the world every single day….

When asked about challenges that the team have experienced so far, Ms Ritola was quick to point out the issue of paywalls. She explained that the Iris.ai system is connected to about 130 million open access papers – almost all those available to the public – but that many useful documents are still hidden behind systems that require users to pay for access.

However, rather than just accepting this situation as it is, the Iris.ai team have devised a scheme to solve the problem– Project Aiur – an initiative that aims to revolutionise the current workings of the research world.

“What we’re trying to do is to build a community, which is not owned by us, but by a community of researchers, a community of coders, anyone who wants to contribute to building a new economic model for science that works around a community governed AI-based Knowledge Validation Engine and an open, validated repository of science. Over time, the goal is to give access to all the research articles that are in this world”, Ms Ritola told The Saint.

This is not a straightforward task, as the Iris.ai team are faced with the challenge of encouraging researchers to publish and carry out their investigations using Aiur rather than the current systems- something that will take a fair amount of research and incentivisation. The team have started a pledge, offering students and researchers the chance to be an “advocate for validated, reproducible, open-access scientific research.” At the time of the interview,Ms Ritola informed The Saint that more than 5,000 people had signed the pledge….”

The SPAR Ontologies

“Over the past eight years, we have been involved in the development of a set of complementary and orthogonal ontologies that can be used for the description of the main areas of the scholarly publishing domain, known as the SPAR (Semantic Publishing and Referencing) Ontologies. In this paper, we introduce this suite of ontologies, discuss the basic principles we have followed for their development, and describe their uptake and usage within the academic, institutional and publishing communities….”

Agile Knowledge Engineering and Semantic Web (AKSW) — Agile Knowledge Engineering and Semantic Web (AKSW)

“The Research Group Agile Knowledge Engineering and Semantic Web (AKSW) is hosted by the Chair of Business Information Systems (BIS) of the Institute of Computer Science (IfI) / University of Leipzig as well as the Institute for Applied Informatics (InfAI).

Goals

  • Development of methods, tools and applications for adaptive Knowledge Engineering in the context of the Semantic Web
  • Research of underlying Semantic Web technologies and development of fundamental Semantic Web tools and applications
  • Maturation of strategies for fruitfully combining the Social Web paradigms with semantic knowledge representation techniques

AKSW is committed to the free softwareopen sourceopen access and open knowledge movements.”

Weaving a Semantic Web across OSS repositories: unleashing a new potential for academia and practice

Abstract:  Several public repositories and archives of “facts” about libre software projects, maintained either by open source communities or by research communities, have been flourishing over the Web in the recent years. These have enable new analysis and support new quality assurance tasks.

This paper presents some complementary existing tools, projects and models proposed both by OSS actors or research initiatives, that are likely to lead to useful future developments in terms of study of the FLOSS phenomenon, and also to the very practitioners in the FLOSS development projects, provided that interoperability is fostered at all places.

A goal of the research conducted within the HELIOS project, is to address bugs traceability issues. For that, we investigate the potential of using Semantic Web technologies in navigating between many different bugtracker systems scattered all over the open source ecosystem.

By using Semantic Web techniques, it is possible to interconnect the databases containing data about open-source software projects development, hence letting OSS partakers identify resources, annotate them, and further interlink them using dedicated properties, collectively designing a distributed semantic graph. Such links expressed with standard Semantic techniques are paving the way to new applications (including ones meant for “end-users”). For instance this may have an impact on the way research efforts are conducted (less fragmented), and could also be used by development communities to improve Quality Assurance tasks.

Weaving a Semantic Web across OSS repositories: unleashing a new potential for academia and practice

Abstract:  Several public repositories and archives of “facts” about libre software projects, maintained either by open source communities or by research communities, have been flourishing over the Web in the recent years. These have enable new analysis and support new quality assurance tasks.

This paper presents some complementary existing tools, projects and models proposed both by OSS actors or research initiatives, that are likely to lead to useful future developments in terms of study of the FLOSS phenomenon, and also to the very practitioners in the FLOSS development projects, provided that interoperability is fostered at all places.

A goal of the research conducted within the HELIOS project, is to address bugs traceability issues. For that, we investigate the potential of using Semantic Web technologies in navigating between many different bugtracker systems scattered all over the open source ecosystem.

By using Semantic Web techniques, it is possible to interconnect the databases containing data about open-source software projects development, hence letting OSS partakers identify resources, annotate them, and further interlink them using dedicated properties, collectively designing a distributed semantic graph. Such links expressed with standard Semantic techniques are paving the way to new applications (including ones meant for “end-users”). For instance this may have an impact on the way research efforts are conducted (less fragmented), and could also be used by development communities to improve Quality Assurance tasks.

Taylor & Francis is bringing AI to academic publishing – but it isn’t easy | The Bookseller

“Leading academic publisher Taylor & Francis is developing natural language processing technology to help machines understand its books and journals, with the aim to enrich customers’ online experiences and create new tools to make the company more efficient.

The first step extracts topics and concepts from text in any scholarly subject domain, and shows recommendations of additional content to online users based on what they are already reading, allowing them to discover new research more easily. Further steps will lead to semantic content enrichment for more improvements in areas such as relatedness, better searches, and finding peer-reviewers and specialists on particular subjects….”