Estimated costs of implementing an open access policy at a private foundation | bioRxiv

“Background: The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (GBMF) was interested in understanding the potential effects of a policy requiring open access to peer-reviewed publications resulting from the research the foundation funds. Methods: We collected data on more than 2000 publications in over 500 journals that were generated by GBMF grantees since 2001. We then examined the journal policies to establish how two possible open access policies might have affected grantee publishing habits. Results: We found that 99.3% of the articles published by grantees would have complied with a policy that requires open access within 12 months of publication. We also estimated the maximum annual costs to GBMF for covering fees associated with “gold open access” to be between $400,000 and $2,600,000 annually. Discussion: Based in part on this study, GBMF has implemented a new open access policy that requires grantees make peer-reviewed publications fully available within 12 months.”

Implementing a Public Access Policy: A Guide for HRA Member Organizations; and HRA Member Public Access Policy Template

“To assist HRA [Health Research Alliance] member organizations wishing to adopt a public access policy, the HRA Public Access Task Group partnered with the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to enable HRA member-funded awardees/grantees* to deposit their publications into PubMed Central (PMC)….The following is a template developed by the HRA Public Access Task Group in conjunction with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) that can be used by organizations seeking to implement public access policies as a condition of award funding. This template is based on the policy developed by HRA member organization, Autism Speaks. …”

Good practices for university open-access policies

“This is a guide to good practices for college and university open-access (OA) policies. It’s based on the type of rights-retention OA policy first adopted at Harvard, Stanford, MIT, and the University of Kansas. Policies of this kind have since been adopted at a wide variety of institutions in North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia, for example, at public and private institutions, large and small institutions, affluent and indigent institutions, research universities and liberal arts colleges, and at whole universities, schools within universities, and departments within schools….”

Berlin Appeal for Open Science sent to decision-makers – Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB)

“Although Open Science is an issue currently being discussed by policy-makers in Germany and at EU level, there is a lack of drive to implement it in practice. In the context of the Open Science Fellows Program initiated by Wikimedia Deutschland and the Stifterverband in 2016, young academics have joined forces and, working in accordance with the principles of Open Science, have drawn up five points that need to be implemented in policy and research in order to make full use of the advantages it offers: the Berlin Appeal for Open Science. They call for the basic conditions for Open Science to be further improved in a bid to promote the cultural transition towards more openness in science. Only then can the possibilities offered by Open Science be fully exploited, enabling us to advance as a knowledge society.”

CSIR Ghana adopts open access policy | EIFL

“EIFL welcomes the adoption of an open access (OA) policy by Ghana’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, the body mandated by the government to carry out scientific and technological research for national development.

The adoption of the policy emerged out of an EIFL-funded project implemented by the CSIR’s Institute for Scientific and Technological Information (CSIR-INSTI). The project, which aims to foster development and implementation of an OA policy, started in 2015.”

Cambridge’s journey towards Open Access

“Presentation given at Open Repositories 2017, Brisbane, Australia. General track 13: Evaluation and assessment. This presentation discusses the open agenda supported by funder policies in the United Kingdom (UK), how these policies interact with one another and the resulting implications for higher education institutions using the case study of the University of Cambridge. The University of Cambridge has responded to the challenges of open research by founding the Office of Scholarly Communication and dedicating specialized teams to manage compliance with both Open Access and research data requirements. Since 2013 the Open Access Service has processed over 10,000 article submissions and spent more than £7 million on article processing charges. The experiences at Cambridge in responding to these challenges are an important lesson for anyone engaged in open research. This talk offers some insights into a potential way to manage funder mandates, but also acts as a cautionary tale for other countries and institutions considering introducing mandates around Open Access and what the implementation of certain policies might entail. The skills around management of open policies are significantly different to traditional library activity, and this has implications for training and recruitment of staff.”

 

Implementing open access mandates in Europe

“The implementation of open access policies in Europe is a socio-technical undertaking whereby a wide range of stakeholders work together to bring out the benefits of open access for European and global research. This work provides a unique overview of national awareness of open access in 32 European countries involving all EU member states and in addition, Norway, Iceland, Croatia, Switzerland and Turkey. It describes funder and institutional open access mandates in Europe and national strategies to introduce and implement them. An overview of the current European repository infrastructures is given, including institutional and disciplinary repositories, national repository networks, information portals and support networks. This work also outlines OpenAIREplus, a continuation project which aims to widen the scope of OpenAIRE by connecting publications to contextual information, such as research data and funding information. Opportunities for collaboration in order to achieve European and global synergies are also highlighted. The OpenAIRE project, a joint collaboration among 38 partners from 27 European countries, has built up a network of open repositories providing free online access to knowledge produced by researchers receiving grants from the European Commission or the European Research Council. It provides support structures for researchers, operates an electronic infrastructure and a portal to access all user-level services and works with several subject communities. Birgit Schmidt is affi liated with Goettingen State and University Library. Iryna Kuchma is affiliated with EIFL.”

DeepGreen: Open-access-Transformation | ZBW MediaTalk

“The green route (link in German) to open access describes the storage of quality-assured text publications (postprints) and other digital content in an institutional or disciplinary repository (freely accessible online database). One path on the green route is the alliance licences negotiated nationally between libraries and publishers. The open access components contained therein allow authors from academic institutions which hold the relevant rights to publish their publications immediately or following an embargo period in a repository of their choice, usually their own institution. However, implementing these open access components is a laborious process: it requires authors to upload their publication to the repository themselves at the appropriate point or the library as their institutional representative to find the article and upload it to the repository manually. Often, the relevant rights holders do not take action and the publications remain with the publisher….The aim of DeepGreen is to automatically transfer those academic publications which can be made freely available after set waiting periods according to licensing rights into open access. Automating the process should relieve the burden on academics and libraries and increase the number of open access publications available to the German academic community….”

Passing a Campus Open Access Policy – OpenCon

“On March 31, Florida Gulf Coast University’s (FGCU) Faculty Senate passed an Open Access policy! The Open Access Archiving Policy ensures that future scholarly articles authored by FGCU faculty will be made freely available to the public by requiring faculty to deposit copies of their accepted manuscripts in the university’s repository, DigitalFGCU.”

Challenges and opportunities: Open Educational Resources (OERs) at McGill University

“‘Challenges and Opportunities: Open Educational Resources (OERs) at McGill University,’ recommends:

  1. The SSMU and McGill University should engage in further data collection and information on OERs and affordable course content at McGill. a. This should be done in order to better understand where OERs may have the most impact for students and educators (e.g. what faculty or specific courses could be initial OER candidates)
  2. The SSMU and other student associations on-campus should engage in greater student advocacy efforts towards OERs. This would include educating the McGill community on the concerns of course material accessibility, what OERs are and how they can be utilized on campus.
  3. Increase the amount of institutional support for OERs on-campus through:
    1. Partnerships with the Library and Teaching & Learning Services
    2. Adoption of OER policies by the University and/or individual departments/faculties
    3. Increasing on-campus incentives to adopt/create OERs, including but not limited to financial incentives, recognition awards, and/or time-off for faculty interested in employing/developing OERs”