News & Views: Trendspotting in OA Spending – Delta Think

“The findings in the report are not surprising: they match closely with Delta Think’s numbers from October, and with those in similar reports. Open access is established; it now covers significant minority share of output, but its growth is slowing:

  • Globally, publishers offer OA options mainly through hybrid journals: 72% of journals are hybrid, 19% fully OA, and 9% of journals are subscription only.
  • Uptake, in terms of articles suggests that 19% of all articles published are available immediately on publication as OA, split between 15% in fully OA journals and just under 4% in hybrid journals.
  • The report explores delayed OA options, giving a read on Green OA, with an uptake of just under 5% in the year of publication.
  • The 2017 update reduces its OA estimates slightly compared with its 2015 version. The results are summarized in the table below. The variations speak to the challenges in gathering data, and the necessity to keep refining models over time….”
  • APCs now form a significant additional expense. For the payments that universities make to the seven largest publishers, the ratio between subscriptions and APCs is 5:1. This equates to a 17% share of revenue compared to a 31% share of output. As we have discussed in our previous market analyses, on average the revenue generated by OA is proportionately less than its share of output.
  • More than half the expenditure on APCs in 2016 went to the three major publishing groups, Elsevier, Springer Nature, and Wiley, with a particularly sharp rise for Elsevier since 2014.
  • The report confirms the well-known finding that APCs for hybrid journals are more expensive that those in fully OA journals: 28% higher on average in 2016.
  • But, this gap may be closing: hybrid prices paid rose by 14% in the three years from 2013 (to £2,095 on average), but by 33% for fully-OA journals (to £1,640) in the same period. Delta Think’s market models suggest that, whilst hybrid prices are higher, they also bear higher discount levels, so it would appear that the gap between fully OA and hybrid prices is closing….
  • The number of APCs paid by a sample of 10 UK universities rose more than fivefold.
  • The average cost of an APC rose by 16% (as compared with a rise of 5% in the consumer price index; the CPI.)
  • Spending on subscriptions for the report’s sample rose by 20%.
  • Nuances within hybrid spending show the same quadrupling of APCs, with combined APC & sub spending up by one third…in other words, APC spending is eating share. The ratio between subscription and hybrid APC spending has fallen to 6:1 in 2016 from 19:1 3 years previously….”

Scholarly & Professional E-Book Publishing 2018-2022

“Electronic books are one of the fastest growing segments of scholarly and professional publishing. E-books offer creative possibilities for expanding access as well as changing learning behavior and academic research. Content can always be accessible, regardless of time or place, to be read on PCs or on portable book readers. Books need never go out of print, and new editions can be easily created. Scholarly & Professional E-Book Publishing 2018-2022 provides an overview and financial outlook for the global scholarly and professional e-book publishing markets based on specific research and analysis of the leading competitors’ performance. Company performance is projected through 2018. The overall market is divided into law, science and technology, medical, social science and humanities and business publishing. Market categories are projected through 2022….”

Study on open science: monitoring trends and drivers

“The proposed study will build on existing evidence collected by the pilot open science monitor as well as other relevant and available studies. The open science monitor provided a first analysis of trends, drivers, barriers and incentives to open science in Europe. It also makes available, tests and applies a methodology for the collection of hard empirical data on open science trends. Based on this preparatory work, the contractors will design, draft, execute and deliver a full-fledged monitoring system in order to determine open science scope, nature, impacts on science and scientific knowledge, and its socio-economic impacts. In turn, this will provide an evidence-based view of evolution of open science. It should be able to facilitate policy making….”

Study on open science: monitoring trends and drivers

“The proposed study will build on existing evidence collected by the pilot open science monitor as well as other relevant and available studies. The open science monitor provided a first analysis of trends, drivers, barriers and incentives to open science in Europe. It also makes available, tests and applies a methodology for the collection of hard empirical data on open science trends. Based on this preparatory work, the contractors will design, draft, execute and deliver a full-fledged monitoring system in order to determine open science scope, nature, impacts on science and scientific knowledge, and its socio-economic impacts. In turn, this will provide an evidence-based view of evolution of open science. It should be able to facilitate policy making….”

Project to monitor open science kicked off

“CWTS [Netherlands’ Centre for Science and Technology Studies] participates in a new project to stimulate and monitor the development of open science and scholarship. The project “Open sciece: Monitoring trends and drivers” celebrated its kick off meeting last January at the EC premises in the presence of jean Claude Burgelman (DG Research & Innovation, European Commission) and Paul Hofheinz (President and Co-Founder of The Lisbon Council). The aim of the study is to further develop the Open Science Monitor, that started as a pilot study. The project consortium is led by Lisbon Council (coordinator). The other two partners are ESADE , and CWTS. Elsevier participates as subcontractor….”

Project to monitor open science kicked off

“CWTS [Netherlands’ Centre for Science and Technology Studies] participates in a new project to stimulate and monitor the development of open science and scholarship. The project “Open sciece: Monitoring trends and drivers” celebrated its kick off meeting last January at the EC premises in the presence of jean Claude Burgelman (DG Research & Innovation, European Commission) and Paul Hofheinz (President and Co-Founder of The Lisbon Council). The aim of the study is to further develop the Open Science Monitor, that started as a pilot study. The project consortium is led by Lisbon Council (coordinator). The other two partners are ESADE , and CWTS. Elsevier participates as subcontractor….”

5 Tips for Keeping Your Finger on the Open Access Pulse – Copyright Clearance Center

“The pace of change in open access shows no sign of slackening in 2018. Here, Rob Johnson shares his advice on keeping up to date with the latest developments….Peter Suber’s OA tracking project (@oatp) provides crowd-sourced alerts about dozens of open access developments across the world every day….”

How Readers Discover Content in Scholarly Publications: Trends in reader behavior from 2005 to 2015

“Headline findings:

As a starting point for search, A&Is seem to be in a slight decline when looked at in aggregate across all regions and sectors, but remain the most important. Figure 4, p11 ? Academic researchers in high income countries now rate library discovery as highly as A&Is, and rate academic search engines as the most important discovery resource when searching for journal articles. Figure 11, p18 ? Library discovery services have made significant advances in importance in search for academic researchers, and for all roles in hard sciences in the academic sector. As an average across all subjects and sectors, however, they have not grown in importance in since 2012. Figure 4, p11; Figure 7, p14; Figure 11, p18 ? More than half of all journal content delivery appears to be from free incarnations of articles. There appears to be a clear PubMedCentral effect in the medical sector. Social media sites appear to be a significant source of free articles in lower income countries. Figure 37, p39 ? In academic STM in higher income countries, academic search engines are now more important than general search engines. Figure 4, p11 ? Table of Contents alerts have reduced in popularity in all measures across the survey. Figure 26, p31; Figure 35, p37 ? There appears to be an increased role for social media in discovery. Figure 9, p16 ? Online book discovery varies significantly by sector, with academics preferring library web pages marginally over general web search engines, the medical sector preferring A&I services and library web over search engines, but all other sectors preferring search engines over other forms of discovery. Figure 31, p34 ? Publisher web sites are becoming more popular as a search resource, although this is less true for people in wealthier countries. Figure 10, p17; Figure 18, p24 ? Google Scholar is used more than Google in the academic sector, but less than Google in all other sectors. Figure 22, p27 ? A perceived lack of awareness of Google Scholar in poorer nations appears to be leading to a reduced use of free incarnations of content in institutional repositories from these regions. Page 40 ? Readers in low income countries use their mobiles to access journals more than their counterparts in richer countries. However, access by phone still accounts for only about 10% of the use. Figure 42, p44 ? A&Is continue to be the most important search method in the medical sector. Figure 15, p21 ? The primary method of journals discovery is search, but even more so for online books. Figure 33, p35 ? App use for journal discovery is still low. Figure 45, p45 ? The most highly sought-after features of journal web sites are changing. Figure 49, p48 …”

Stand der Dinge: Open Access in der Verwaltungsforschung – Open PuMa

From Google translate:

The state of affairs: Open Access in administrative research

What options are available for openly publishing articles and books, what this costs and how authors can refinance these fees.

Chen and Olijhoek 2016 have reviewed 1000 scientific journals worldwide and developed a measure of Open Access (OA) quality. Unfortunately, no specific results for individual research areas, such as administrative sciences, can be read from this study. Among other things, despite the subject of the study, no data is provided here, where you could have understood this yourself! However, Melero et al 2017 take up the instrument developed by Chen and Olijhoek and use it to examine the Spanish journal landscape. Here are the social science journals those with the highest OA rate and the strongest author rights, probably mainly because the journals are published according to this study, especially by educational and research institutions. These usually work in a nonprofit way and do not make a profit with the release.”

‘Inclusive access’ takes off as model for college textbook sales

Major education publishers — including Pearson, Cengage and McGraw-Hill Education — report that the number of colleges offering “inclusive-access” programs has grown rapidly in recent years. Where previously students might have been assigned textbooks individually, now many institutions are signing up whole classes of students to automatically receive digital course materials at a discounted rate, rather than purchasing individually. The “inclusive” aspect of the model means that every student has the same materials on the first day of class, with the charge included as part of their tuition. For publishers with struggling print businesses, the inclusive-access model is a lifeline. Tim Peyton, vice president of strategic partnerships at Pearson, said it was no secret that publishers like Pearson had made textbooks too expensive and had seen sales drop as a result. “The print model is really a broken business model for us,” he said, adding, “we’re thinking about how to move away from print, and move towards digital.”