Project Euclid and SPIE announce publishing technology partnership

“Project Euclid and SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, announced today a publishing technology partnership to launch a new Project Euclid platform late in 2020. Project Euclid, jointly managed by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press, is an online host and aggregator of over 100 scholarly journals, book series, and conference proceedings in mathematics and statistics. SPIE will develop and power Project Euclid’s new platform in an innovative technology model that brings nonprofit organizations together for the shared development of major publishing infrastructure….”

Unusual Business: A University Press Goes Private, And No One is the Wiser — G. Geltner

“On 11 March this year, a brief announcement by the University of Amsterdam (UvA) and Amsterdam University Press (AUP) marked the latter’s transfer into private hands. The upbeat text conjures up a healthy image: a rigorous restructuring had saved an ailing organization. Following a dire diagnosis, AUP achieved a great “track record” and “international visibility” and was “stable and growing.” “A good moment” presented itself to let AUP direct its own destiny, a “long-cherished dream” of its new owner, whose “network in the sector” reassured UvA Ventures Holding B.V., the company through which the UvA formally owned AUP, of the press’s bright future.

Anyone unversed in the corporate idiom of mergers and acquisitions could easily be forgiven for reading the press release as a tale of unmitigated success. The truth is more complex, and shrouded in secrecy since neither the UvA, nor UvA Ventures Holding B.V., nor AUP itself have been forthcoming about the precise circumstances of the press’s privatization. It seems, at any rate, that what led to the UvA’s decision was a desire to cut its losses, rather than faith in the press’s viability….

As a proud former author, advisory board member and a series editor at AUP until recently, I (like other colleagues I’ve polled) was never formally told in real time by the press about this rather dramatic change in its status. But perhaps even more telling is that the UvA never specifically disclosed the reasons why tax-paid scholarship and the labor of numerous staff members turn at the stroke of a pen into someone else’s private property, even if contributors originally signed up to publish, review, edit and indeed solicit scholarly texts on behalf of an ostensibly public press. Some of these “content creators” may not care that they are literally volunteering to produce wealth for a private company that is unaccountable to them, and which may fold or be sold to the highest bidder, with no guarantee that fields it supports today will be continued tomorrow. (On that topic, see, most recently, s.v. Ashgate). Others, like me, very much do care….”

New Open Access Agreements with SpringerNature and Oxford University Press | Medarbetarwebben

“The Swedish library consortium, of which SLU is a participant, has entered two new agreements with the scientific publishers SpringerNature and Oxford University Press. Both agreements state that any fees associated with open access publishing (APCs) are paid for centrally by the institution of the corresponding author instead of the authors themselves….”

Scholarly E-Books and University Presses – Part Two – The Scholarly Kitchen

“What happens to print when digital is available first and for free? Does print get cannibalized by free, open digital. Or does free, open digital lead to more print activity?

LB [Lisa Bayer]: Rather than a complement, which might imply subsidiary, I see e-books and aggregated digital content as equally important to print for scholarly books. For complex and diverse reasons, monographs are much less likely to be purchased in print editions by research libraries, especially given the enhanced accessibility, portability, and discoverability that digitally delivered content affords. When we send our content to aggregators, we join a huge network of scholarly publishers reaching thousands of institutions worldwide: that is mission-critical. At one of the last O’Reilly Tools of Change for Publishing conferences I heard a smart person say, “The page is no longer primary.” For most of our customers, print books are still primary. But university presses operate in a file-based ecosystem, increasingly so with Open Access pilots and platforms such as Manifold, PubPub, Fulcrum, Humanities Open Book, and the Sustainable History Monograph Program….”

Cambridge University signs San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment | University of Cambridge

“The University of Cambridge and Cambridge University Press today announce that they have signed up to the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), a set of recommendations agreed in 2012 that seek to ensure that the quality and impact of research outputs are “measured accurately and evaluated wisely”. …”

The Monograph Is Broken. Long Live the Monograph. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

“Despite the steadfast nature of this trust dynamic in publishing, scholarly-book publishing has been in a self-professed state of crisis for at least the past quarter century, even as the number of scholarly books published increases each year. This crisis is rooted in the desire of — and necessity for — scholars to publish monographs at a time when sales of such books continue to dwindle. These conflicting pressures are exacerbated by other changes, such as the growth of digital publishing and open access….”

Author Services Manager – Cambridge University Press

“We are looking for a responsive, collaborative and decisive candidate to take on the strategically important role of Author Services Manager within our Academic publishing department. The role sits in the Scholarly Communications Research and Development team and works cross-functionally with other teams within the Academic business division.

You will have the opportunity to manage a range of projects which further our strategic aim to provide a best-in-class service for academic authors across books and journals. This strategy encompasses all aspects of author experience: from author journey mapping and innovative service development, to the improvement of author data collection and author feedback collection. There is a growing focus on author experience within the open research space and this role will proactively drive changes to the author proposition in response, identifying opportunities to better meet authors’ needs in a more open scholarly communications environment. …”

ScienceOpen and Tsinghua University Press partner to increase impact of Chinese research – ScienceOpen Blog

The discovery platform ScienceOpen is partnering with Tsinghua University Press (TUP) to contextualize and promote Chinese research within an interactive research environment. This partnership integrates six TUP journals as featured collections in the ScienceOpen Super Collection ‘Tsinghua University Press’.

 

Tsinghua University Press started its international outreach in the 1990s and has ever since been actively involved in the international exchange of scientific research. Thanks to the resources of Tsinghua University, TUP has been one of the key players in the Chinese academic and higher education publishing landscape. With its freely accessible, interactive discovery environment of over 55 million article records, ScienceOpen places TUP’s journal content within a broad international research framework….”

North Carolina press seeks sustainable open-access model for monographs

The University of North Carolina Press is leading an experiment to significantly lower the cost of producing scholarly books — an important step toward a sustainable open-access publishing model for monographs.

Many university presses have experimented with open-access monographs, but few have transitioned away from charging fees for most work, as they are unable to do so sustainably, said John Sherer, director of UNC Press….

One ambitious OA monograph initiative, Toward an Open Monograph Ecosystem (TOME), offers university presses subsidies of $15,000 per book. Sherer’s project aims to demonstrate that a subsidy of $7,000 could suffice….”

North Carolina press seeks sustainable open-access model for monographs

The University of North Carolina Press is leading an experiment to significantly lower the cost of producing scholarly books — an important step toward a sustainable open-access publishing model for monographs.

Many university presses have experimented with open-access monographs, but few have transitioned away from charging fees for most work, as they are unable to do so sustainably, said John Sherer, director of UNC Press….

One ambitious OA monograph initiative, Toward an Open Monograph Ecosystem (TOME), offers university presses subsidies of $15,000 per book. Sherer’s project aims to demonstrate that a subsidy of $7,000 could suffice….”