Stuck at home? View cultural heritage collections online – Open Objects

“With people self-isolating to slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, parents and educators (as well as people looking for an art or history fix) may be looking to replace in-person trips to galleries, libraries, archives and museums* with online access to images of artefacts and information about them. GLAMs have spent decades getting some of the collections digitised and online so that you can view items and information from home….”

Stuck at home? View cultural heritage collections online – Open Objects

“With people self-isolating to slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, parents and educators (as well as people looking for an art or history fix) may be looking to replace in-person trips to galleries, libraries, archives and museums* with online access to images of artefacts and information about them. GLAMs have spent decades getting some of the collections digitised and online so that you can view items and information from home….”

PHAROS: A digital research space for photo archives | Art Libraries Journal | Cambridge Core

Abstract:  The PHAROS consortium of fourteen international art historical photo archives is digitizing the over 20 million images (with accompanying documentation) in its combined collections and has begun to construct a common access platform using Linked Open Data and the ResearchSpace software. In addition to resulting in a rich and substantial database of images for art-historical research, the PHAROS initiative supports the development of shared standards for mapping and sharing photo archive metadata, as well as for best practices for working with large digital image collections and conducting computational image analysis. Moreover, alongside their digitization efforts, PHAROS member institutions are considering the kinds of art-historical questions the resulting database of images could be used to research. This article indicates some of the prospective research directions stimulated by modern technologies, with the aim of exploring the epistemological potential of photographic archives and challenging the boundaries between the analogue and the digital.

 

Digitisation is putting the world’s greatest works within reach

“One of the greatest changes in the art world in recent years won’t be seen in galleries because it is happening online. Digitisation programs have accelerated in the past five years and most state art institutions now have more than half of their collections online, changing the way we approach art and rapidly turning the world into a virtual gallery.

BBy the end of this year, Art UK, a cultural resource founded in 2003, will have completed a photographic catalogue of every piece of publicly owned painting and sculpture in Britain.

At home, meanwhile, the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) now has 92 per cent of its collection online (up from just 11 per cent in 2014). The National Gallery of Australia has digitised 60 per cent and the National Museum of Australia 68 per cent of their collections.

These numbers are still dwarfed by the big international aggregation sites that helped foster the global digitisation of visual culture – Wikimedia Commons, Europeana and to a lesser extent Google Arts & Culture. But governments and state institutions are now finishing the task of hanging the world’s art online….”

Digitisation is putting the world’s greatest works within reach

“One of the greatest changes in the art world in recent years won’t be seen in galleries because it is happening online. Digitisation programs have accelerated in the past five years and most state art institutions now have more than half of their collections online, changing the way we approach art and rapidly turning the world into a virtual gallery.

BBy the end of this year, Art UK, a cultural resource founded in 2003, will have completed a photographic catalogue of every piece of publicly owned painting and sculpture in Britain.

At home, meanwhile, the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) now has 92 per cent of its collection online (up from just 11 per cent in 2014). The National Gallery of Australia has digitised 60 per cent and the National Museum of Australia 68 per cent of their collections.

These numbers are still dwarfed by the big international aggregation sites that helped foster the global digitisation of visual culture – Wikimedia Commons, Europeana and to a lesser extent Google Arts & Culture. But governments and state institutions are now finishing the task of hanging the world’s art online….”

The First Anniversary of CMA Open Access: Benefiting People Now and Forever

“It’s hard to believe a year has passed since the Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA) launched its Open Access program. On January 23, 2019, the CMA released high-resolution images of all its public-domain artworks, as well as collections information (metadata) for more than 61,000 art objects — both those in the public domain and those with copyright restrictions — with the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) Public Domain Dedication. The museum’s director and president, William M. Griswold, offered remarks on the occasion that emphasized Open Access as an essential way to fulfill the museum’s mission in the 21st century. The CMA’s commitment to Open Access is ongoing. To the more than 31,000 images released at the launch, the museum added 258 artworks on January 1, 2020, and will do so every year going forward as works enter the public domain….”

Keeping digitised works in the public domain: how the copyright directive makes it a reality | Europeana Pro

“The principle that works in the public domain should remain in the public domain once digitised, which Europeana has defended for almost ten years, was recently incorporated into European law. In this post, we interview Andrea Wallace, Lecturer in Law at the University of Exeter, about the importance of this provision for the cultural heritage sector and her research on Article 14….”

How Years Of Copyright Maximalism Is Now Killing Pop Music | Techdirt

“Almost five years ago, we warned that years of copyright maximalists brainwashing the public about ever expansive copyright and the need for everything to be “owned” had resulted in the crazy Blurred Lines decision that said that merely being inspired by another artist to make a song that has a similar feel, even if it doesn’t copy any actual part of the music, was infringing. We warned that this would lead to bad things — and it has.

Over the last few years, we’ve been detailing story after story of similar cases being filed. It’s become so common that we don’t even bother to write about most of the cases. As we’ve said, though, this really is the industry reaping what they’ve sowed. It’s gotten so crazy that even the RIAA (yes, that RIAA) has felt the need to tell courts that maybe their interpretation of copyright has gone too far in the direction of over-protecting copyright holders.

It’s now become such a fact of life that the NY Times has a giant article on how copyright is basically eating pop music these days. …”

14 Paris Museums Put 300,000 Works of Art Online: Download Classics by Monet, Cézanne & More | Open Culture

“First trips to Paris all run the same risk: that of the museums consuming all of one’s time in the city. What those new to Paris need is a museum-going strategy, not that one size will fit all. Tailoring such a strategy to one’s own interests and pursuits requires a sense of each museum’s collection, something difficult to attain remotely before Paris Musées opened up its online collections portal….”

Open content : plus de 100 000 œuvres des collections des musées de la Ville de Paris en libre accès | Paris Musées

From Google’s English:  “A new step in the development of Paris Museums’ digital policy, the launch of Open Content contributes to increasing and improving the dissemination of collections and reinforces actions in favor of better access to art and culture. It also promotes increased visibility of works and knowledge of municipal collections in France and abroad.

This opening of data guarantees free access and reuse by all of digital files, without technical, legal or financial restrictions, for commercial use or not.

Images representing works belonging to the public domain under CCØ license (Creative Commons Zero) are made available to all internet users via the Paris Musées collections portal. Initially, the reproductions of works in 2D which are not subjected to rights are available in Open Content, the images subjected to rights remain in low definition in order to illustrate the files of the website of the collections. Art lovers can for example download the works of the big names in photography (Atget, Blancard, Marville, Carjat …) or painting (Courbet, Delacroix, Rembrandt, Van Dyck …)….”