Indonesia’s first scientific data bank is a step towards strengthening ‘open data’ practices

“In August 2019, the government launched the National Scientific Repository (RIN) to become a national-level repository that aggregates research data from various sources.

Born from the mandate of Indonesia’s new science law, the repository aims to make research data accessible for the academic community to verify scientific discoveries better and make it easier for other scientists to further contribute to the field.

Although challenges remain, the newly launched national repository is a great first step in strengthening open data practices and improving research quality in Indonesia….”

Indonesia tops open-access publishing charts

 

European funders have been leading a charge under ‘Plan S’ to make more of the scientific literature free to read. Yet the nations that publish the highest proportion of their research papers open access (OA) aren’t in Europe, according to a preliminary analysis shared with Nature. Instead, countries in southeast Asia, Africa and South America are leading the way — thanks to a flourishing network of local open-access journals and publishing portals….”

Linking Open Access Movement to the Indonesian Islamic Higher Education | Atlantis Press

Abstract:  The Open Access Movement promote disseminate scientific research and data that can be accessed by many parties, both amateur and professional. The research was done to elaborate the relation between the movement and Islamic Higher Education in term of principles and implementation. Through literature study and fieldwork observation, it is found that the spirit of Open Access Movement has already embedded in Islamic Higher Education through volunteerism, openness and selflessness in Indonesian Islamic universities. This movement is also conformable with general Indonesian Islamic education, which has been spread out as the terms: Tuan Guru, Kyai, Buya, Ajengan and other experts Appellation. All have been contributed in spreading knowledge with volunteerism and non-profit. The implementation of Open Access in Islamic Higher Education has been done through Open Journal System and some lecturers in everyday coaching. The openness and free coaching reach the spirit and slogan of Indonesian Ministry of Religion, Ikhlas Beramal (Work with Sincerity).

Linking Open Access Movement to the Indonesian Islamic Higher Education | Atlantis Press

Abstract:  The Open Access Movement promote disseminate scientific research and data that can be accessed by many parties, both amateur and professional. The research was done to elaborate the relation between the movement and Islamic Higher Education in term of principles and implementation. Through literature study and fieldwork observation, it is found that the spirit of Open Access Movement has already embedded in Islamic Higher Education through volunteerism, openness and selflessness in Indonesian Islamic universities. This movement is also conformable with general Indonesian Islamic education, which has been spread out as the terms: Tuan Guru, Kyai, Buya, Ajengan and other experts Appellation. All have been contributed in spreading knowledge with volunteerism and non-profit. The implementation of Open Access in Islamic Higher Education has been done through Open Journal System and some lecturers in everyday coaching. The openness and free coaching reach the spirit and slogan of Indonesian Ministry of Religion, Ikhlas Beramal (Work with Sincerity).

57: Radical Transparency (with Rebecca Willén) by Everything Hertz Podcast

“Dan and James are joined by Rebecca Willén (Institute for Globally Distributed Open Research and Education) to discuss transparency in scientific research and how she started her own independent research institute in Bali.

Here’s what they cover:

– Rebecca explains the story behind her practice of sharing disclosure statements for her published work
– Many people are changing their research practices for the better for current research – but what about their *past* research?
– The 21 word solution
– Using disclosure statements in your pHD
– The state of research openness in forensic psychology
– The flexibility in determining a primary outcome
– How and why Rebecca founded the IGDORE research institute 
– The drawbacks to starting your own research institute 
– Rebecca’s recommendation for getting started with open science
– The story behind the RONIN institute…”

IGDORE – Institute for Globally Distributed Open Research and Education

Institute for Globally Distributed Open Research and Education (IGDORE) is an independent research institute dedicated to improve the quality of science, science education, and quality of life for scientists, students and their families. We’re committed to open scientific practices, free (libre) and open science, and a healthy and global science and higher education. We aim to protect whistleblowers in science and to educate and train affiliated and external scientists and students on best scientific practices.

Scientists who adhere to open scientific practices can become affiliated with IGDORE. We currently have 37 affiliated researchers whose work spans over 15 scientific disciplines (e.g. astronomy; biology; chemistry; computer science; education; electrical engineering; law; materials science; medicine; metascience; paleontology; physics; psychology; sociology). Our location independence allows affiliated scientists to reside anywhere in the world: our scientists reside in no less than 17 countries (Australia; Belgium; Brazil; Canada; Croatia; Denmark; Finland; France; India; Indonesia; Luxembourg; Netherlands; South Africa; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom; United States)….”

Open education can address Indonesia’s educational inequalities – Opinion – The Jakarta Post

“On the other hand, in Indonesia, as in other developing countries, there is lingering concern over the “colonization of pedagogical practices”,  where  “valuable knowledge” is the one produced by “foreign” knowledge producers — legitimate, national curriculum producers or scholars from developed nations. Such a mindset is also reflected in our awe over high ranks in international league tables such as the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA). We also place high prominence on publishing of scholarly work in international journals – which is indeed necessary, but we pay scant attention to inequities in education….”

OpenCon 2018 Jakarta

From Google’s English: “The OpenCon Satellite event is the OpenCon 2018 event flagship event held in Toronto Canada in collaboration with York University. The OpenCon Satellite Event itself is held in various parts of the world with a total of more than 67 countries in the world. OpenCon 2018 Jakarta is a satellite event held in Indonesia by Open Access Indonesia with a global theme “Empowering the next generation to advance open access, open education and open data.” Meanwhile, the sub theme for OpenCon 2018 Jakarta satellite event is: “Bringing Students Together by Mainstreaming Open Education, Open Access, and Open Data. ”  …”

Data aggregators: a solution to open data issues – Open Knowledge International Blog

“Open Knowledge International’s report on the state of open data identifies the main problems affecting open government data initiatives. These are: the very low discoverability of open data sources, which were rightfully defined as being “hard or impossible to find”; the lack of interoperability of open data sources, which are often very difficult to be utilised; and the lack of a standardised open license, representing a legal obstacle to data sharing. These problems harm the very essence of the open data movement, which advocates data easy to find, free to access and to be reutilised.  

In this post, we will argue that data aggregators are a potential solution to the problems mentioned above.  Data aggregators are online platforms which store data of various nature at once central location to be utilised for different purposes. We will argue that data aggregators are, to date, one of the most powerful and useful tools to handle open data and resolve the issues affecting it.

We will provide the evidence in favour of this argument by observing how FAIR principles, namely Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability and Reusability, are put into practice by four different data aggregators engineered in Indonesia, Czech Republic, the US and the EU. …”