Open Access in Indonesia – Irawan – – Development and Change – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Despite the absence of funding pressures that explicitly mandate a shift to open access (OA), Indonesia is a leader in OA publishing. Indonesia subscribes to a non?profit model of OA, which differs from that promoted by Plan S. The penetration of bibliometric systems of academic performance assessment is pushing Indonesian scholars away from a local non?profit model of OA to a model based on high publication charges. This article considers whether Plan S promotes or undermines the ability of Indonesian scholars to develop systems of OA adapted to local resource constraints and research needs.

 

Open Access in Indonesia – Irawan – – Development and Change – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Despite the absence of funding pressures that explicitly mandate a shift to open access (OA), Indonesia is a leader in OA publishing. Indonesia subscribes to a non?profit model of OA, which differs from that promoted by Plan S. The penetration of bibliometric systems of academic performance assessment is pushing Indonesian scholars away from a local non?profit model of OA to a model based on high publication charges. This article considers whether Plan S promotes or undermines the ability of Indonesian scholars to develop systems of OA adapted to local resource constraints and research needs.

 

Redesign open science for Asia, Africa and Latin America

“Research is relatively new in many countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Across these regions, young scientists are working to build practices for open science from the ground up. The aim is that scientific communities will incorporate these principles as they grow. But these communities’ needs differ from those that are part of mature research systems. So, rather than shifting and shaping established systems, scientists are endeavouring to design new ones….”

Frontiers | Improving Public Access to COVID-19 Pandemic Data in Indonesia for Better Public Health Response | Public Health

“The experience of various countries and health organizations in dealing with epidemics underscore the importance of transparent data collection systems for access to useful health information that augments the readiness of the government and other stakeholders to face the next pandemic. The various benefits that accrue from such data before, during, and after an outbreak are summarized in Table 1. …

Many questions surround the Indonesian government’s response to COVID-19: has it been adequate and evidence-based, or scattered and reactive without a clear strategy? These concerns about the optimal use of data to inform effective coping strategy for COVID-19 were strengthened on April 13, 2020, when President of Indonesia, Joko Widodo, ordered the COVID-19 National Task Force to provide the broadest possible public access to COVID-19 data (22). Previously, the national data trends included only the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19, recoveries, and fatalities. There was no information on suspected COVID-19 patients who died. Moreover, the national data trends did not capture demographic and geographical details of the reported cases. Similar patterns of incomplete data also occurred at the provincial and district levels, which harmed the efficacy of policy initiatives at the local level….

In conclusion, as illustrated in Table 1, failing to translate raw data into useful information for public consumption will hamper the development of science-based approaches to control disease outbreaks. Indonesia may not derive maximum benefit from its experience of tackling the COVID-19 pandemic as lessons learned are not documented and will likely be overlooked. The Government of Indonesia, especially the Indonesian Ministry of Health, should begin to manage COVID-19 data properly and provide unfettered public and academic access to the raw data for transparency. Importantly, it should allow the analysis of this data to inform current and future public health responses.”

Indonesia is number 1 for open access journal publication in the world: what it means for the local research ecosystem – dasaptaerwin.net

“The latest data shows Indonesia ranks first by publishing 1,717 journals with open access, followed by the UK (1,655) and Brazil (1,544) (note: we don’t the exact number, but we’re sure that at least 90% of them are using Open Journal System from PKP). The total of OA journals in the DOAJ list is only 16% of the total journals published in Indonesia. (note: we compare the total number from DOAJ with Garuda scientific database)

This achievement shows that Indonesia has an important position in the world of academic publications in the world. This article seeks to explain what this achievement means for the research ecosystem in Indonesia….”

Indonesia nomor 1 untuk publikasi jurnal akses terbuka di dunia: apa artinya bagi ekosistem riset lokal

“With the largest number of OA journals in the world, the knowledge of Indonesian researchers should be able to freely reach the public.

The government has started to realize this.

This is evidenced by the recent Law on National Science and Technology System ( UU Sisnas Science and Technology ) which also began requiring the application of this open access system for research publications to ensure that research results can be enjoyed by the public.

Through this obligation, the government hopes to encourage not only the transparency of the research process, but also innovations and new findings that benefit society….

According to our records, the research publication system in Indonesia since the 1970s has implemented the non-profit principle. At that time research publications were sold for a subscription fee which was usually calculated from the cost of printing only. This system is different from that found in developed countries which are dominated by commercial publishing companies.

This is where Indonesia triumphs over any research ecosystem.

Some that can match it are the Scielo research ecosystem in Brazil, the African Journal Online (AJOL) scientific publishing ecosystem and the Africaxiv from the African continent…..”

Popular preprint servers face closure because of money troubles

“The rise of preprint repositories has helped scientists worldwide to share results and get feedback quickly. But several platforms that serve researchers in emerging economies are struggling to raise money to stay afloat. One, which hosts research from Indonesia, has decided to close because of this funding shortfall.

INA-Rxiv, which was set up in 2017, was one of the first repositories to host studies from a particular region. Previous platforms served specific disciplines: for example, arXiv, the original preprint repository, hosts physical-sciences research, and bioRxiv is a popular repository for biology studies. Other region or language-specific repositories followed, including ArabiXiv, which hosts Arabic-language research; AfricArxiv and IndiaRxiv. Managers of these repositories say they increase exposure for research from the regions, and facilitate collaborations.

INA-Rxiv, ArabiXiv, AfricArxiv and IndiaRxiv are run by volunteers around the world, but the servers are hosted online by the non-profit Center for Open Science (COS), based in Charlottesville, Virginia. The centre’s platform hosts 26 repositories, including more than a dozen that are discipline-specific.

In December 2018, the COS informed repository managers that from 2020, it would be introducing fees, charged to repository managers, to cover maintenance costs. The charges, which were finalized last December, start at about US$1,000 a year, and increase as repositories’ annual submissions grow….”

Indonesia’s first scientific data bank is a step towards strengthening ‘open data’ practices

“In August 2019, the government launched the National Scientific Repository (RIN) to become a national-level repository that aggregates research data from various sources.

Born from the mandate of Indonesia’s new science law, the repository aims to make research data accessible for the academic community to verify scientific discoveries better and make it easier for other scientists to further contribute to the field.

Although challenges remain, the newly launched national repository is a great first step in strengthening open data practices and improving research quality in Indonesia….”

Indonesia tops open-access publishing charts

 

European funders have been leading a charge under ‘Plan S’ to make more of the scientific literature free to read. Yet the nations that publish the highest proportion of their research papers open access (OA) aren’t in Europe, according to a preliminary analysis shared with Nature. Instead, countries in southeast Asia, Africa and South America are leading the way — thanks to a flourishing network of local open-access journals and publishing portals….”

Linking Open Access Movement to the Indonesian Islamic Higher Education | Atlantis Press

Abstract:  The Open Access Movement promote disseminate scientific research and data that can be accessed by many parties, both amateur and professional. The research was done to elaborate the relation between the movement and Islamic Higher Education in term of principles and implementation. Through literature study and fieldwork observation, it is found that the spirit of Open Access Movement has already embedded in Islamic Higher Education through volunteerism, openness and selflessness in Indonesian Islamic universities. This movement is also conformable with general Indonesian Islamic education, which has been spread out as the terms: Tuan Guru, Kyai, Buya, Ajengan and other experts Appellation. All have been contributed in spreading knowledge with volunteerism and non-profit. The implementation of Open Access in Islamic Higher Education has been done through Open Journal System and some lecturers in everyday coaching. The openness and free coaching reach the spirit and slogan of Indonesian Ministry of Religion, Ikhlas Beramal (Work with Sincerity).