Mallorca Declaration on Open Science (January 2016)

“Open Science is essential if the world is to successfully address the major challenges that it now faces. To have impact, Open Science must be based on accessibility, transparency and integrity, enabling trusted collaboration for research excellence and optimal delivery. This declaration specifically addresses the key barriers to Open Science, and builds on previous statements concerning Open Science…. 1. Remove the barriers that extreme competition for limited resources create for Open Science True progress on Open Science…. 2. Implement Open Access publishing where publication is part of the continuum of research…. 3. Establish competence and confidence in the practice of Open Data…. 4. Ensure research integrity…. 5. A cohesive European approach….” 

Impact of Social Sciences – Formalised data citation practices would encourage more authors to make their data available for reuse

“It is increasingly common for researchers to make their data freely available. This is often a requirement of funding agencies but also consistent with the principles of open science, according to which all research data should be shared and made available for reuse. Once data is reused, the researchers who have provided access to it should be acknowledged for their contributions, much as authors are recognised for their publications through citation. Hyoungjoo Park and Dietmar Wolfram have studied characteristics of data sharing, reuse, and citation and found that current data citation practices do not yet benefit data sharers, with little or no consistency in their format. More formalised citation practices might encourage more authors to make their data available for reuse.”

DO NOT PUBLISH, or Sometimes, open data/open access not ideal – UC Berkeley Library News

“Some fields such as paleontology and archaeology have long maintained restrictions on the publication of site locations and promoted government policies and regulations to limit collection and trade in fossils, artefacts, and culturally sensitive and/or scientifically important material. Organizations such as the U.S. Forest Service do not disclose geospatial data in order to protect research sites. Other solutions include modification of research permits so that endangered species locations are not automatically uploaded into wildlife databases and masking such records on private land, as presently occurs in some states in the United States.

Is this relevant to any public health research? Other than personally identifiable information, what types of health data should not be made widely available?”

Kenya leads the way for African countries to shift to more open, accessible and data-driven national agricultural policies | Diana Szpotowicz | Pulse | LinkedIn

“The event had a simple mission: to spur greater investment in agriculture and food nutrition data, especially in the G77 countries – a mission shared by the United Nations and the African Union this year.

The conference was co-convened by the Government of Kenya, the G77 Secretariat, African Union (NEPAD) and the Platform of African Farmers’ Organizations (PAFO).”

A global multiproxy database for temperature reconstructions of the Common Era | Scientific Data

“Proxy records used in the PAGES2k synthesis products are publicly available through previous publications or online data archives, or because their owners made them available for inclusion in this open-access data product. The original data for 49 records are made available for the first time in this data product (specified in Supplementary Table 1). Open access is a critical component of this endeavor, and led us to reject some records that would have been suitable under the other criteria. …”

How IBM is using the world’s surplus computer power to help the planet | Ethical Corporation

“This week, the scientific community is being offered a new opportunity to advance the quest for ways to combat climate change. IBM is inviting scientists around the world to apply for a technology grant (valued at $40m) of crowd-sourced supercomputing power, meteorological data from The Weather Company, and IBM Cloud storage to support their climate or environmental research project. 

Up to five of the most promising environmental and climate-related research projects will be supported, with technology and services contributions valued commercially at approximately $200 million….

In return for this support, winning scientists agree to support open science by publicly releasing the research data from their collaboration with us, enabling the global community to benefit from and build upon their findings.? …”

The Next Generation of 3D Tiles

“Nearly two years ago, we announced the 3D Tiles initiative for streaming massive heterogeneous 3D geospatial datasets. It is amazing and humbling to see how much of it has come to fruition and how a vibrant community has formed around 3D Tiles.

With this initial success, we now have the foundation for modern 3D geospatial: Cesium as the canvas, 3D Tiles as the conduit, and the seemingly endless stream of geospatial data as the supply.

The data acquisition trends are clear: we are collecting more data, more frequently, at a higher resolution and lower cost than ever before, and the data is inherently 3D, driven by heterogeneous sources such as photogrammetry and LIDAR.

The challenge now is to realize the full value of these data. With your help, of course!…”

Open Research Central

“Open Research Central is a portal through which research in any field can be submitted for formal publication on one of the open research publishing platforms.

These platforms are currently operated by F1000 and use a model of immediate publication followed by transparent invited peer review, and require the inclusion of all supporting data (see here for more details of the model).

This model has been running on F1000Research since its inception in 2013. It is also used on Wellcome Open Research (launched November 2016) for Wellcome grant holders, and will also be used on the upcoming Gates Open Research for Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant holders and UCL Child Health Open Research for all research groups at UCL focusing on child health. See the respective platforms for details of the current model, as well as author guidelines and policies.

The model continues to evolve through ongoing consultation with a wide variety of stakeholders, including numerous researchers across scientific disciplines, research funders, institutions, policy makers, and others.

While F1000 is currently maintaining Open Research Central and the publishing platforms, our longer-term plan is to transition Open Research Central to being owned and governed by the international research community with broad representation across research funding agencies, research institutions, and researchers themselves. We will assemble a governing board shortly to start this process….”

ORC – Open Research Central: ‘repulsive and malevolent’ or ‘lover of rebellion and freedom’ | F1000 Blogs

“Our ORC is Open Research Central, it is a portal through which research in any field can be submitted for formal publication on one of the open research publishing platforms that we provide for funders and institutes.

We envision Open Research Central as a portal that will ultimately free researchers from the prisons of academic journals and become the default way in all research areas to formally publish their findings. It will be underpinned by several key principles: immediate publication; open data; open, transparent post publication peer review; and fully open access to all. If we succeed we will bring about a revolution in how academic researchers share their findings. A revolution with far reaching consequences that will significantly benefit not only the way research progresses but also our society in general, so dependent on the research that the sciences, engineering and humanities produce.”