Open Access Data Analyst

“The University of California Libraries and the California Digital Library (CDL) are at the center of a broad strategy to transition UC’s multi-million dollar journal license expenditures to open access publishing through negotiated transformative agreements with scholarly publishers. The development and adoption of new open access publishing models requires CDL to expand its current capacity to include additional focus on strategic planning, workflow development and implementation, and tracking and assessment. CDL is also committed to partnering with other North American academic institutions, offering expertise and direct support in an effort to accelerate the global transition to open access.

The Open Access Data analyst will join a highly team-based environment within CDL’s Collection Development and Management Program, supporting the transition to open access publishing by engaging in complex data analysis projects, gathering data from a variety of sources and synthesizing it into outputs offering insights and predictive models to help guide strategy and inform discussions with publishers. The Open Access Data Analyst will support work both within the UC system and with other partner institutions, creating reports and visualizations which can communicate results to technical and nontechnical stakeholders throughout the library and university administration. A successful candidate will be able to embed data analysis into the transformative agreement negotiation and implementation processes, producing meaningful results to guide strategy and constantly iterating based on feedback and changing priorities to be responsive and sensitive to a dynamic environment.

The California Digital Library is a collaborative effort of the ten campuses of the University of California. As a UC systemwide library, CDL provides services to and on behalf of the UC system in partnership with the UC campus libraries. The CDL is a unit within the UC Office of the President, has a staff of 70+ and is located in downtown Oakland.

This position is a three-year contract appointment and includes the same generous employee benefits afforded UC career employees. Applicants from outside the Bay Area who wish to work remotely will be considered….”

Blog – Europe PMC: The new Europe PMC is here

“It’s time to embrace change. Today Europe PMC proudly unveils a new website, packed with useful features. The improved Europe PMC offers a better search and reading experience, as well as better access to data….”

Frontiers | Opportunities in Open Science With AI | Big Data

“This article examines the current trends and elaborates the future potentials of AI in its role for making science more open and accessible. Based on the experience derived from a research project called Microsoft Academic, the advocates have reasons to be optimistic about the future of open science as the advanced discovery, ranking, and distribution technologies enabled by AI are offering strong incentives for scientists, funders and research managers to make research articles, data and software freely available and accessible….”

NIH to Host Informational Webinar on the Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance

“NIH will be hosting an informational public webinar on the Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and supplemental draft guidance on Monday, December 16, 2019 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET. The purpose of this webinar is to provide information on the draft policy and answer any clarifying questions about the public comment process. Public comments will NOT be accepted via the webinar but must instead be sent through the comment form. Comments on the draft Policy and draft supplemental guidance can be submitted here https://osp.od.nih.gov/draft-data-sharing-and-management/ electronically through Friday, January 10, 2020….”

TU Delft Strategic Plan Open Science 2020-2024 | TU Delft Repositories

Abstract:  Open Science is creating new forms of scientific interaction that were impossible or undreamed of in an earlier age. This has a strong impact on core academic processes like research, education and innovation. It is, for instance, easier to replicate an experiment if the relevant data sets are digitally available to any scientist who wishes to corroborate her colleague’s findings.TU Delft has a long history of engagement with Open Science. Yet, with its Open Science Programme 2020-2024, Research and Education in the Open Era, TU Delft wishes to take Open Science to the next level: a situation in which Open Science has become the default way of practising research and education, and the “information era” has become the “open era”. It is TU Delft’s ambition to be frontrunner in this revolutionary process. This is reflected in the TU Delft Strategic Framework 2018-2024, with “openness” as one of its major principles.The TU Delft Open Science Programme 2020-2024 tackles all areas of scholarly engagement where restrictions limit the flow of academic knowledge. It proposes new approaches to the process of research, education and innovation, with a strong focus on transparency, integrity and efficiency.The programme consists of five interrelated projects: Open Education, Open Access, Open Publishing Platform, FAIR Data, and FAIR Software. The projects are aimed at creating and disseminating various types of resources for the benefit of TU Delft researchers, teachers and students, as well as the general public. They will range from educational materials and software to a publishing platform. All outputs of the programme will be as ‘FAIR’ as possible: findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable.

Data Repository Selection: Criteria That Matter – Request For Comments – F1000 Blogs

“Publishers and journals are developing data policies to ensure that datasets, as well as other digital products associated with articles, are deposited and made accessible via appropriate repositories, also in line with the FAIR Principles. With thousands of options available, however, the lists of deposition repositories recommended by publishers are often different and consequently the guidance provided to authors may vary from journal to journal. This is due to a lack of common criteria used to select the data repositories, but also to the fact that there is still no consensus of what constitutes a good data repository. 

To tackle this, FAIRsharing and DataCite have joined forces with a group of publisher representatives (authors of this work) who are actively implementing data policies and recommending data repositories to researchers. The result of our work is a set of proposed criteria that journals and publishers believe are important for the identification and selection of data repositories, which can be recommended to researchers when they are preparing to publish the data underlying their findings. …”

Data Repository Selection: Criteria That Matter – Request For Comments – F1000 Blogs

“Publishers and journals are developing data policies to ensure that datasets, as well as other digital products associated with articles, are deposited and made accessible via appropriate repositories, also in line with the FAIR Principles. With thousands of options available, however, the lists of deposition repositories recommended by publishers are often different and consequently the guidance provided to authors may vary from journal to journal. This is due to a lack of common criteria used to select the data repositories, but also to the fact that there is still no consensus of what constitutes a good data repository. 

To tackle this, FAIRsharing and DataCite have joined forces with a group of publisher representatives (authors of this work) who are actively implementing data policies and recommending data repositories to researchers. The result of our work is a set of proposed criteria that journals and publishers believe are important for the identification and selection of data repositories, which can be recommended to researchers when they are preparing to publish the data underlying their findings. …”

Are huge genetic databases leaving marginalized people out of their data? | Salon.com

“However, as promising as biobanks might seem, the data may tell only partial or even misleading stories. Criticisms of the project include that the research coming out of the UK Biobank will only benefit certain people, and even then, the usefulness of the health associations found are under question.

Compared to the 2011 UK census, Black, Indian, Pakistani and Chinese participants are all underrepresented in the Biobank by at least one third. David Curtis, at University College London, tested whether this under-representation of ethnic minority groups has any impact on schizophrenia genetics research….”