Promoting an Open Research Culture: The TOP Guidelines for Journals (version 2)

“By developing shared standards for open practices across journals, we hope to translate scientific norms and values into concrete actions and change the current incentive structures to drive researchers’ behavior toward more openness. Although there are some idiosyncratic issues by discipline, we sought to produce guidelines that focus on the commonalities across disciplines….”

WarSampo: Publishing and Using Linked Open Data about the Second World War

“The WarSampo system 1) initiates and fosters large scale Linked Open Data (LOD) publication of WW2 data from distributed, heterogeneous data silos and 2) demonstrates and suggests its use in applications and DH research. WarSampo is to our best knowledge the first large scale system for serving and publishing WW2 LOD on the Semantic Web for machine and human users. Its knowledge graph metadata contains over 9 million associations (triples) between data items including, e.g., a complete set of over 95,000 death records of Finnish WW2 soldiers, 160,000 authentic photos taken during the war, 32,000 historical places on historical maps, 23,000 war diaries of army units, and 3,400 memoir articles written by the veterans after the war. WarSampo data comes from several Finnish organizations and sources, such as National Archives, Defense Forces, Land Survey of Finland, Wikipedia/DBpedia, text books, and magazines.

WarSampo has two separate components: 1) WarSampo Data Service for machines and 2) WarSampo Semantic Portal with various applications for human users.”

Harvard University Privacy Tools Project

The Privacy Tools Project is a broad effort to advance a multidisciplinary understanding of data privacy issues and build computational, statistical, legal, and policy tools to help address these issues in a variety of contexts. It is a collaborative effort between Harvard’s Center for Research on Computation and Society, Institute for Quantitative Social ScienceBerkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, and Data Privacy Lab, and MIT Libraries’ Program on Information Science.

Our work is funded by the National Science Foundation, the Sloan Foundation, the US Bureau of the Census, and Google. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed on this website are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of our funders….”

The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship | Scientific Data

Abstract:  There is an urgent need to improve the infrastructure supporting the reuse of scholarly data. A diverse set of stakeholders—representing academia, industry, funding agencies, and scholarly publishers—have come together to design and jointly endorse a concise and measureable set of principles that we refer to as the FAIR Data Principles. The intent is that these may act as a guideline for those wishing to enhance the reusability of their data holdings. Distinct from peer initiatives that focus on the human scholar, the FAIR Principles put specific emphasis on enhancing the ability of machines to automatically find and use the data, in addition to supporting its reuse by individuals. This Comment is the first formal publication of the FAIR Principles, and includes the rationale behind them, and some exemplar implementations in the community.

Open risk assessment: methods and expertise – Verloo – 2016 – EFSA Journal – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Risk analysis and risk governance face a decline in social trust at both the scientific and policy levels. The involvement of society in the process has been proposed as an approach to increasing trust and engagement by making better use of available data and knowledge. In this session, EFSA explored the challenges in building trust and engagement and the latest thinking and methodologies for increasing openness that can help the organisation to move beyond traditional dialogue and towards a more sustainable stakeholder and society interaction. The discussion centred on the needs of EFSA and of target audiences throughout the process, from risk assessment initiation through societal decision-making and communication. The main focus of the session was on methodologies and approaches that would enable EFSA to increase its scientific rigour and build trust from additional inputs gained by opening up its risk assessments at the level of data gathering, data analysis, expertise and innovation. This will require an approach that moves beyond traditional risk assessment practices that rely on a long chain of static information and knowledge such as scientific articles, reviews, expert groups and committees.

Open risk assessment: data – Gilsenan – 2016 – EFSA Journal – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Since its foundation, EFSA and the Member States have made significant progress in the area of data collection for risk assessment and monitoring. In partnership with competent authorities and research organisations in the Member States, EFSA has become a central hub of the European data on food consumption, chemical occurrence and foodborne outbreaks. Beyond EFSA’s use of these data and sharing of contaminants and food consumption data with the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization to support international risk assessment, they remain largely unexploited. In addition, for some of its risk assessments, EFSA also relies on published information, as well as on scientific studies sponsored and submitted by industry. The environment in which the Authority operates has significantly evolved since its foundation. The growth of digital technology has granted scientists and consumers alike faster and more efficient access to data and information. The open data movement, which has entered the sphere of the European Union institutions, is unleashing the potential for reuse of data. In parallel, the work of EFSA is increasingly subject to demands for more openness and transparency across its spectrum of stakeholders. EFSA aims to enhance the quality and transparency of its outputs by giving access to data and promoting the development of collaborative platforms in Europe and internationally. EFSA also plans to work with data providers and organisations funding research to adopt open data concepts and standards; gaining better access to, and making better use of, data from a wider evidence base. During the breakout session on ‘Open Risk Assessment: Data’ at the EFSA 2nd Scientific Conference ‘Shaping the Future of Food Safety, Together’ (Milan, Italy, 14–16 October 2015) opportunities and challenges associated with open data, data interoperability and data quality were discussed by sharing experiences from various sectors within and outside EFSA’s remit. This paper provides an overview of the presentations and discussions during the breakout session.

Clinical trials revolution could change the future of medical research | Science | The Guardian

“In tumultuous times, it is easy to miss the fact that science is undergoing a quiet revolution. For several years now, concerns have been peaking in biomedicine about the reliability of published research – that the results of too many studies cannot be reproduced when the methods are repeated. Alongside growing discontent, the scientific community has answered by driving forward a raft of open science reforms. From initiatives to making research data publicly available, to ensuring that all published research can be read by the public, the aim of these reforms is simple: to make science more credible and accessible, for the benefit of other scientists and the public who fund scientific research.”

Open Humans

“Open Humans is a program of the nonprofit Open Humans Foundation and has been funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Knight Foundation. Our 2015 launch was written up in Forbes, Newsweek, Scientific American, and more.

You decide when to share. You have valuable data, and you’ll decide when to share it. The data you provide will be private by default. You can choose which projects to share with. You can also opt to make some (or all) of your data public, so anyone can access and research it!

Studies, projects, and more. Browse our activities list to see the many potential data sources you can add, and interesting projects you can join.

Be a part of research. We’ll recognize your contributions with badges on your profile page, invite you to talk to other community members in our online forums, and periodically post new activities, study updates, and relevant interviews in our newsletters and on our blog….”