OSF for Institutions

“OSF [Open Science Framework] Institutions is a free scholarly web tool that enhances transparency, fosters collaboration, and increases the visibility of research outputs at the institutional level. The Center for Open Science partners with research institutions to create central hubs for research projects on a branded, dedicated OSF page.

Single sign-on authentication creates a seamless and integrated framework that accommodates custom research workflows and streamlines data management. You can focus your efforts on generating and sharing research, not on building and maintaining research infrastructure….”

Albertsons Library Adopts Open Access Statement – UPDATE

“Albertsons Library faculty adopted a ‘Statement of Support For Open Access‘ on March 13, encouraging library faculty and staff to make their work openly accessible.

The statement shows Albertsons Library’s dedication to access to information, aligning it with the 2016 Association of College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL) statement in support of open access. The statement also encourages ‘librarians to make other forms of scholarship, such as monographs, presentations, grey literature and data, openly accessible.’ Albertsons Library advocates for the open dissemination of library and information sciences scholarship and fully supports open access for publishing as it allows for greater exposure, discovery and retention of author rights.

Albertsons Library encourages other departments across campus to consider a similar statement. Contact your library liaison if you would like assistance or have any questions.

In addition, library faculty members Memo Cordova and Amber Sherman have worked to raise awareness of the open access publishing model, including:

  • Presentations to library staff on ‘Library Journal Impact Measurements’ that compared and contrasted open access publications and paywall counterparts
  • Working with the library’s Promotion and Tenure committee to insert language that includes disseminating knowledge ‘through traditional and/or scholarly open access venues’
  • Writing an article on the cost of academic publishing and open access for Boise State’s own The Blue Review, published on March 12″

Albertsons Library Adopts Open Access Statement – UPDATE

“Albertsons Library faculty adopted a ‘Statement of Support For Open Access‘ on March 13, encouraging library faculty and staff to make their work openly accessible.

The statement shows Albertsons Library’s dedication to access to information, aligning it with the 2016 Association of College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL) statement in support of open access. The statement also encourages ‘librarians to make other forms of scholarship, such as monographs, presentations, grey literature and data, openly accessible.’ Albertsons Library advocates for the open dissemination of library and information sciences scholarship and fully supports open access for publishing as it allows for greater exposure, discovery and retention of author rights.

Albertsons Library encourages other departments across campus to consider a similar statement. Contact your library liaison if you would like assistance or have any questions.

In addition, library faculty members Memo Cordova and Amber Sherman have worked to raise awareness of the open access publishing model, including:

  • Presentations to library staff on ‘Library Journal Impact Measurements’ that compared and contrasted open access publications and paywall counterparts
  • Working with the library’s Promotion and Tenure committee to insert language that includes disseminating knowledge ‘through traditional and/or scholarly open access venues’
  • Writing an article on the cost of academic publishing and open access for Boise State’s own The Blue Review, published on March 12″

Open Access Policies and Academic Freedom: Understanding and Addressing Conflicts

Abstract:  The adoption of open access (OA) policies that require participation rather than request it is often accompanied by concerns about whether such mandates violate researchers’ academic freedoms. This issue has not been well explored, particularly in the Canadian context. However the recent adoption of an OA policy from Canada’s major funding agencies and the development of the Fair access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR) in the United States has made addressing the issue of academic freedom and OA policies an important issue in academic institutions. This paper will investigate the relationship between OA mandates and academic freedom with the context of the recent OA policy at the University of Windsor as a point of reference. While this investigation concludes that adopting OA policies that require faculty participation at the institutional level should not be an issue of academic freedom, it is important to understand the varied factors that contribute to this tension. This includes misunderstandings about journal based (gold) and repository based (green) OA, growing discontent about increased managerialism in universities and commercialization of research, as well as potential vagueness within collective agreements’ language regarding academic freedom and publication. Despite these potential roadblocks, a case can be made that OA policies are not in conflict with academic freedom given they do not produce the harms that academic freedom is intended to protect.

Bringing together the work of subscription and open access specialists: challenges and changes at the University of Sussex

“The rise in open access (OA) publishing has required library staff across many UK academic institutions to take on new roles and responsibilities to support academics. At the same time, the long-established work of negotiating with publishers around journal subscriptions is changing as such deals now usually include OA payment or discount plans in many different forms that vary from publisher to publisher.

This article outlines some of the issues we encountered at the University of Sussex Library whilst trying to pull together the newer strand of OA advocacy and funder compliance work with existing responsibilities for managing subscription deals. It considers the challenges faced in effectively bringing together Library staff with knowledge in these areas, and outlines the steps we have taken so far to ensure OA publishing is taken into account wherever appropriate. “

Impact of Social Sciences – Are universities finally waking up to the value of copyright?

“Following in the footsteps of the ‘Harvard-style’ open access policies that have proved so popular in the US, Imperial College are now heading up the development of a UK version, which would give UK universities a non-exclusive licence to make their academics’ work available in their institutional repositories, under a CC BY-NC licence, and on the date of publication. It is early days for this initiative, but it would seem to offer the best opportunity so far for enabling the retention of copyright by academia for academia. Perhaps, at long last, copyright in scholarly outputs will remain with those who both create and consume them….”

Budapest Open Access Initiative | Open Access: Toward the Internet of the Mind

“On February 14, 2002, a small text of fewer than a thousand words quietly appeared on the Web: titled the “Budapest Open Access Initiative” (BOAI), it gave a public face to discussions between sixteen participants that had taken place on December 1 and 2, 2001 in Budapest, at the invitation of the Open Society Foundations (then known as the Open Society Institute)….Wedding the old – the scientific ethos – with the new – computers and the Internet – elicited a powerful, historically grounded synthesis that gave gravitas to the BOAI. In effect, the Budapest Initiative stated, Open Access was not the hastily cobbled up conceit of a small, marginal band of scholars and scientists dissatisfied with their communication system; instead, it asserted anew the central position of communication as the foundation of the scientific enterprise. Communication, as William D. Harvey famously posited, is the “essence of science,” and thanks to the Internet, scientific communication could be further conceived as the distributed system of human intelligence….”

Open Access policy adopted by IU Bloomington faculty – Scholarly Communication

“The Bloomington Faculty Council unanimously approved an Open Access policy today that ensures that faculty scholarship will be accessible and available to the public for future generations. Open Access means that scholarly articles are regarded as the fruits of research that authors give to the world for the sake of inquiry and knowledge without expectation of payment. Adopting such a policy reduces barriers to research and learning by making research available on the public internet to be downloaded and shared freely, making it possible for scholarship to be more widely read and cited than literature that appears in closed-access, licensed journal databases. The Scholarly Communication department has posted both the policy and accompanying FAQ on our website.

The Scholarly Communication staff will be available to help authors deposit their work — usually the final version of an article that has gone through peer review — in IUScholarWorks or another repository for archival purposes. Indeed, as Nazareth Pantaloni, Copyright Librarian for the IU LIbraries, observed: ‘The Indiana University Libraries are delighted that the Bloomington Faculty Council has joined the over 300 U.S. colleges and universities who have decided to make their faculty’s scholarship more freely available under an Open Access policy. We look forward to working with them to accomplish that goal.’ Faculty members may also contact us to opt-out of the policy, a process that will be incorporated into a one-click form once the policy is fully implemented.

The policy adopted today is only the latest step in an ongoing process at IU Bloomington. The BFC adopted one of the first Open Access policies in the country in March of 2004. That policy was actually a resolution in which the BFC decried the rising costs of academic journals and databases — at the time, 70% of a $9.2 million annual budget — and called on the IU Libraries to adopt several strategies in response, including, among other things, ‘to promote open scholarly communication.’ That resolution served as an impetus for the Libraries’ development of IUScholarWorks. Today, IU ScholarWorks hosts nearly 30 Open Access journals, primarily in the humanities and social sciences, and serves as the repository for nearly 8,000 items deposited by IU Bloomington faculty, students, and staff, including data sets, conference proceedings, out-of-print books recovered by faculty from their original publishers, doctoral dissertations from the Jacobs School of Music, Patten Lectures, and a wide array of journal articles, research reports, other scholarly literature, and even creative works of authorship. Current developments include improvements in the repository’s ability to host multimedia content and data.

Open Access policies are intended, in part, to provide an institutional mechanism for faculty authors to assert the retention of at least the minimum rights necessary in order not only to cooperate with their institutional OA policy, but also be able to reuse their work in other ways that could be beneficial to them, such as distributing their work via their own professional website, through social media, or simply to students in their classes.”

[1702.04855] Open Science, Public Engagement and the University

“Contemporary debates on ‘open science’ mostly focus on the pub- lic accessibility of the products of scientific and academic work. In contrast, this paper presents arguments for ‘opening’ the ongoing work of science. That is, this paper is an invitation to rethink the university with an eye toward engaging the public in the dynamic, conceptual and representational work involved in creating scientific knowledge. To this end, we posit that public computing spaces, a genre of open- ended, public learning environment where visitors interact with open source computing platforms to directly access, modify and create complex and authentic scientific work, can serve as a possible model of ‘open science’ in the university.”

 

Campus open-access policy “Choice Points”

“The basic policy framework recommended in this document highlights the institution’s ability to play a central role in the stewardship of the scholarly record generated by its faculty. The framework is straightforward; campus OA policies require authors to make manuscripts available for deposit in an institution’s repository at the time they are accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Authors automatically grant the institution the right to make their manuscripts openly accessible. At the same time, authors may request a waiver, or “opt out,” of the institutional license for a given article if needed to accommodate a pressing individual circumstance….”