LSU librarians selected by LOUIS to create the Interactive OER for Dual Enrollment program | LSU Libraries News & Notes

“Four LSU librarians have been selected by LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network to join a cohort of 25 librarians from across the state to work alongside instructional designers in order to foster the creation of the Interactive Open Education Resources (OER) for Dual Enrollment program, which will aim to improve the quality of the dual-enrollment program and expand its availability for more high school students. This program was made viable by a two-million-dollar grant from the U.S. Department of Education’s Open Textbooks Pilot program….”

Collaboration between research institutes and large and small publishers for publishing open access journals

Abstract:  Research institutes frequently collaborate with for-profit publishers for the publication of open access journals. This study uses a structural break test to examine the effects of the collaboration between research institutes and large and small for-profit publishers for the publication of 15 gold open access journals on the journals’ internationality and academic influence. The results reveal an improvement in the internationality and academic influence for most of the journals following the collaboration. Additionally, the scale and persistence of the effects are not dependent on the size of the publisher. The findings indicate that large publishers do not have any advantage over small publishers in publishing journals for research institutes. This implies that small publishers can compete with large ones in publishing official journals on behalf of research institutes. However, as collaboration with research institutes strengthens the large publishers’ presence in the open access journal market, it is necessary to monitor their activities, including large publishers’ acquisitions of small ones.

 

inos-project.eu | open and citizen science – active learning approaches – higher education

“TOP REASONS TO FOLLOW INOS

Learn about the social impact of Universities as knowledge creation, sharing and (re-) use ecosystems in the digital economy. Our report on this topic will identify how universities can better meet demand for civic engagement, public participation and societal impact.
Find out when we publish our learning-design framework: a guide for designing open and citizen science activities in a pedagogically sound way.
Join one of our 12 Open Knowledge events. Through datathons, service jams, Dotmocracy workshops, knowledge cafés and other formats, we’ll teach academic and library staff and students about contemporary trends in open and citizen science.
Come innovate with us! We’ll connect open and citizen science with innovation inside and outside universities through eight events, including hackathons, fablabs, game labs, innovation sprints and Futurefactories.
Upgrade your university’s curriculum. We’re supporting universities to include open and citizen science in teaching practices by creating teaching, learning and training resources based on active learning….”

INOS Workshop Outcomes – Open and Citizen Science in Higher Education: Co-Creating a Shared Vision  – LIBER Europe

“On the 16th of March 2021, we held the first of our two-part vision-building workshop series titled ‘Open and Citizen Science in Higher Education: Co-Creating a Shared Vision’. The workshop was designed to inspire participants to think systematically, share their experiences, challenges, and to jointly find solutions to the commonly identified obstacles when it comes to implementing Open and Citizen Science. 37 staff/faculty members and students from libraries and universities attended and discussed citizen science practices at their institutions and how these practices could be possibly adopted to serve as models practices for other Higher Education Institutions (HEI). …”

Jisc partners with Unsub to evaluate UK university journal subscriptions | Jisc

“Jisc has announced that it will be using Unsub, an analytics dashboard, to help evaluate journal agreements that UK universities hold with publishers.

The dashboard, created in 2019 by the not-for-profit software company Our Research, can produce forecasts of different journal subscription scenarios, giving Jisc insight into the costs and benefits of subscription packages for each university and across the consortium. …”

Universities unite for consistency in research data management – ARDC

“In an outstanding collaborative success, 25 of Australia’s 42 universities are coming together to develop a framework to bring consistency to the management of research data across the university sector.

The universities answered a call in 2020 to be part of the ARDC Institutional Underpinnings program, to develop, test and validate a nationally agreed framework for research data management. The program aims to increase Australian universities’ capability in research data management and encourage collective problem-solving and alignment across the sector and the 25 participating universities were announced this week….”

Recognition and rewards in the Open Era: Turning thoughts into actions | Open Working

“The TU Delft Open Science programme held its very first thematic session on the Recognition and Rewards cross-cutting theme on October 5, 2020. The Open Science Programme currently has 5 projects and 3 cross-cutting themes, from FAIR software to Open Education. This means that the programme core team is composed of members from many different departments (not only within the Library), bringing in their diverse perspectives and skills! But this also poses a challenge on teamwork- we need a way for us to all stay in touch, be able to see and learn from each other’s work, and contribute and provide feedback – hence the idea of the thematic sessions.Ingrid Vos, the leader of the Recognition and Rewards theme, has kindly volunteered to lead this first thematic session. Since this theme relates to everyone’s work within the Open Science Programme, Ingrid wanted to make sure everyone can be effectively engaged in the session and their voices can be heard – more on this below.Key takeaways: A re-examination of rewards and recognition is needed to further fuel the cultural and behavioural changes towards open science TU Delft’s work in this aspect builds upon VSNU’s “Room for everyone’s talent” position paper. Every university in the Netherlands has a committee on Recognition & Rewards. The TU Delft committee is led by Ena Voûte. The Open Science Programme team had fruitful discussions around open research and education behaviours and “products”, how to evaluate, appreciate and reward these, as well as emerging career paths We’d love to hear your ideas and thoughts, both on rewards and recognition and on how you’d like to contribute and participate in these discussions- please use the comment section of this post!  …”

EU Trials Tracker — Who’s not sharing clinical trial results?

“The best currently available evidence shows that around half of all trials go unreported: this means that doctors and patients see only a partial, biased fraction of the true evidence. We cannot make informed decisions about treatments unless all the data is reported. Under EU rules, from December 2016, all trials on the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) should post results within 12 months of completion. There has never been a rule as simple and clear as this, anywhere in the world. Our EU Trials Tracker shows which organisations are compliant, and which aren’t. Our paper in the BMJ analysed the data as of January 2018, and found that only 49% of Europe’s clinical trials reported results in the register.

This website is one of a series of Trials Trackers produced by the EBM DataLab at the University of Oxford….”

EU Trials Tracker — Who’s not sharing clinical trial results?

“The best currently available evidence shows that around half of all trials go unreported: this means that doctors and patients see only a partial, biased fraction of the true evidence. We cannot make informed decisions about treatments unless all the data is reported. Under EU rules, from December 2016, all trials on the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) should post results within 12 months of completion. There has never been a rule as simple and clear as this, anywhere in the world. Our EU Trials Tracker shows which organisations are compliant, and which aren’t. Our paper in the BMJ analysed the data as of January 2018, and found that only 49% of Europe’s clinical trials reported results in the register.

This website is one of a series of Trials Trackers produced by the EBM DataLab at the University of Oxford….”