The OpenAIRE Research Graph – OpenAIRE Blog

“The backdrop: Open Science is gradually becoming the modus operandi in research practices, affecting the way researchers collaborate and publish, discover, and access scientific knowledge. Scientists are increasingly publishing research results beyond the article, to share all scientific products (metadata and files) generated during an experiment, such as datasets, software, experiments. They publish in scholarly communication data sources (e.g. institutional repositories, data archives, software repositories), rely where possible on persistent identifiers (e.g. DOI, ORCID, Grid.ac, PDBs), specify semantic links to other research products (e.g. supplementedBy, citedBy, versionOf), and possibly to projects and/or relative funders. By following such practices, scientists are implicitly constructing the Global Open Science Graph, where by “graph” we mean a collection of objects interlinked by semantic relationships.”

Open Access Week 2019 is coming up!!

“The 2019 International Open Access Week will be held October 21-27, 2019. This year’s theme, “Open for Whom? Equity in Open Knowledge,” builds on the groundwork laid during last year’s focus of “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge.”

As has become a yearly habit, OpenAIRE will organise a series of webinars during this week, highlighting OpenAIRE activities, services and tools and reaching out to the wider community with relevant talks. 

On the programme this year:

– Monday October 21st at 11 AM CEST: OpenAPC – cost transparency of Open Access publishing by Christoph Broschinski and Andreas Czerniak (UNIBI)
– Monday October 21st at 2 PM CEST : Research Data Management by S. Venkataraman (DCC) and Thomas Margoni (CREATe)
– Tuesday October 22nd at 10 AM CEST: Horizon 2020 Open Science Policies and beyond by Emilie Hermans (OpenAIRE)
– Friday October 25th at 11 AM CEST: ‘Plan S compliance for Open Access Journals’. Can we make it: ‘Plan S compliance for Open Access Journals – what we know so far and where we think we’re heading’ by Dominic Mitchell (DOAJ)
– Friday October 25th at 2 PM CEST: From Open Science to Inclusive Science by Paola Masuzzo….”

Achieving Open Science in the European Open Science Cloud. Setting out OpenAIRE’s vision and contribution to EOSC – Executive Summary | Zenodo

“Key to EOSC architecture is its sustainability, which will primarily be driven by: 1- a participatory design and governance to accommodate different needs and requirements, 2- shared investments as they are being developed by member states (MS/AC), 3- the ability to adapt to new technologies and foster innovation. It is therefore critical that EOSC architecture avoids at any cost a monolithic and centralized approach, and follow a “System of Systems” approach, where resources are brought together at different levels to deliver data and data services. Emphasis is therefore placed on a business-tobusiness (B2B) sharing (data, services, people) and access, with agreements on: 1- A shared policy compliance framework (i) dictating and applying the rules of how the data elements are published, shared and re-used, and (ii) implementing an interlinked data space where every research result comes with its context (related entities), provenance (full data and science path) and usage….

EOSC will converge national support structures bringing all players together in a collaborative arrangement. No single organization is able to fulfil the Commons approach alone and implementation of Open Science requires specific handling, as most of the barriers are cultural and organizational….

For Open Science to succeed in EOSC, we need to: i) provide services for all stakeholders involved in the research life cycle, ii) ensure data federation for both small and big data to become an integral part of EOSC, iii) embed services in institutional settings, and iv) link to international infrastructures. …”

Business model, cookbook and open data

“Language Science Press is committed to sharing its work with the community. In the context of the OpenAire Project “Full disclosure: replicable strategies for book publications supplemented with empirical data”, we have created a Cookbook for Open Access books, which is complemented by our annoated business model and a release of our business data. For the time being, these items are available from https://www.github.com/langsci/opendata….”

Open Science Fair

“Open Science is a new research paradigm facing many challenges, mainly the ingrained research habits accompanied by non-incentive institutional and funder reward systems, the lack of embedded tools and services, the connection to non-academic communities.

OSFair2019 is organized as an emblematic initiative of OpenAIRE, co-organized by 3 other EU projects in the area of Open Science: FIT4RRI, EOSC Secretariat and FAIRsFAIR. It is locally curated by the University of Minho.

Open Science Fair will critically showcase the elements required for the transition to Open Science: e-infrastructures and services, policies as guidance for good practices, research flows and new types of activities (disseminate, mine, review, assess, etc.), the roles of the respective actors and their networks….”

OpenAIRE Guidelines — OpenAIRE Guidelines documentation

“Welcome to the OpenAIRE Guidelines. The intention of this is to provide a public space to share OpenAIREs work on interoperability and to engage with the community. The OpenAIRE Guidelines helps repository managers expose publications, datasets and CRIS metadata via the OAI-PMH protocol in order to integrate with OpenAIRE infrastructure.

OpenAIRE Guidelines have been released for publication repositories, data archives, CRIS systems, software repositories and repositories of other research products respectively: …”

Open science in the newly adopted Law on Science and Research in Serbia – OpenAIRE Blog

Open Science is an internationally and universally accepted term that includes open (free for the end-users) access to scientific and educational literature, open research, open innovation, open source software, etc. In all documents regulating science in the European Union (and beyond), open access is mandatory, as the wider community has the right of access to the results of scientific research funded from public sources, i.e. by the money of taxpayers. The Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development (MESTD) has unambiguously shown determination in the previous period to follow the principles of open science. This is, above all, reflected in the Open Science Platform (adopted in July 2018, English translation), and in several articles in the recently adopted new Law on Science and Research.

[…]

Defining the Future of Scholarly Communication in Latin America

“There is no “one size fits all” solution for open access. In Latin America, which has a very strong tradition of open access, the favoured approach has been the use of publicly-funded, non-commercial services. To raise awareness of this perspective both inside and beyond the region, LA Referencia has recently published a report, “Scholarly Communication and Open Access: Actions for a Public Policy in Latin America“.

LA Referencia is a network of ten Latin American countries that provides a discovery service for open access content in the region. The council of LA Referencia is governed by representatives from the science and technology departments of the participating governments.

The report was prompted by concerns that discussions in the international community, which are having an impact on all regions, do not appropriately reflect the priorities and traditions of Latin America. In particular, not enough attention is being paid to the importance of repositories and repository networks, especially in terms of their role in changing the economics of the current system.

The report was written for the regional authorities of LA Referencia that attended the annual Global Research Council meeting, which took place in Brazil at the beginning of May. It describes the situation of open access in Latin America, reflects on “Plan S”, and gives a series of recommendations. In particular, the report urges decision-makers to develop and promote a joint vision for the future of open access that reflects the Latin American perspective, and recommends actions for other stakeholders in the system, emphasizing the central role of S&T organisations in achieving this vision.

The report contains several recommendations related to repositories including:

  • Favour a distributed, interoperable model with national, regional, and global aggregators, where each layer offers value-added services, as reflected in the vision for Next Generation Repositories published by Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR).
  • Strengthen the role of repositories in the scientific communication and research information management ecosystem. Repositories are not only a place to deposit and preserve articles, but also to share a wide range of other valuable research outputs.
  • Support relationships across networks in order to strengthen local, regional and national repository services.  LA Referencia already collaborates closely with OpenAIRE and participates in COAR aligning repository networks discussions. These relationships are being enhanced to include other value-added interoperable services such as standard and distributed statistics, notification systems (“brokers”), and alternatives for the use of scientific data repositories such as Zenodo (operated by CERN)….”

Open Journal Systems (OJS) sets new standards to achieve OpenAIRE compliance with JATS – OpenAIRE Blogs

Open Journal Systems (OJS, https://pkp.sfu.ca/ojs/) is an open source journal management and publishing system, developed by the Public Knowledge Project (PKP, https://pkp.sfu.ca/). Around 10,000 journals worldwide and over a thousand journals published in Europe use Open Journal Systems. The latest major version OJS 3 was released in 2016, and since then hundreds of OJS journals have upgraded including large national journal platforms like Tidsskrift.dk and Journal.fi.Therefore, it is important to help the growing number of OJS 3 journals to become compliant with the OpenAIRE infrastructure in terms of comprehensive metadata descriptions of open access articles on research in Europe and beyond….”

Open Journal Systems (OJS) sets new standards to achieve OpenAIRE compliance with JATS – OpenAIRE Blogs

Open Journal Systems (OJS, https://pkp.sfu.ca/ojs/) is an open source journal management and publishing system, developed by the Public Knowledge Project (PKP, https://pkp.sfu.ca/). Around 10,000 journals worldwide and over a thousand journals published in Europe use Open Journal Systems. The latest major version OJS 3 was released in 2016, and since then hundreds of OJS journals have upgraded including large national journal platforms like Tidsskrift.dk and Journal.fi.Therefore, it is important to help the growing number of OJS 3 journals to become compliant with the OpenAIRE infrastructure in terms of comprehensive metadata descriptions of open access articles on research in Europe and beyond….”