Caribbean Literary Heritage

“This project is concerned with the Caribbean literary past and the region’s tangible and intangible literary heritage. It is particularly interested in neglected writers and writings at risk of being lost, and in thinking about what influences such precarity. At present, there is no established platform to access the location and scope of authors’ papers, including many scattered and undocumented sources. The literary histories that researchers and students can access are often incomplete and privilege male writers, as well as those who migrated and published with presses in the global north. This project wants to enable fuller literary histories to be told and their sources to be known, preserved and made accessible…..”

What Page Are You On? Making Online Texts More Reliable for Teachers and Students | UVA Today

“These older novels, often required reading in survey courses on literature, are in the public domain – and that’s why publishers and companies are racing to put them online without having to worry about copyright law. And while free access is a key component, students are not equipped to evaluate what they are getting.”

Pirate Radical Philosophy – Radical Philosophy

“Peter Suber, a leading voice in the open access movement, has recently provided an instance of just such a withdrawal. In January, Suber announced (using Google+ to do so) that he would ‘not referee for a publisher belonging to the Association of American Publishers unless it has publicly disavowed the AAP’s position on the Research Works Act’. The latter, which was introduced in the US Congress on 16 December 2011, was designed to prohibit open access mandates for federally funded research in the USA. The Research Works Act would thus in effect countermand the National Institutes of Health’s Public Access Policy along with other similar open access policies in the USA. To show my support for open access and Suber’s initiative, I publicly stated in January that I would act similarly. [17] Having met with staunch opposition from within both the academic and the publishing communities, all public backing of the Research Works Act has now been dropped as of 27 February. But I can’t help wondering, rather than taking this as a cue to abandon the strategy of refusal, should we not adopt it all the more? Should we not withdraw our academic labour from all those presses and journals that do not allow authors, as a bare minimum, to self-archive the refereed and accepted final drafts of their publications in institutional open access repositories? [18]

As a supporter of long standing, I feel it is important to acknowledge that the open access movement – which is concerned with making peer-reviewed research literature freely available online to all those able to access the Internet – is neither unified nor self-identical. Some regard it as a movement, [19] yet for others it represents a variety of economic models or even just another means of distribution, marketing and promotion. It should also be borne in mind that there is nothing inherently radical, emancipatory, oppositional, or even politically or culturally progressive about open access. The politics of open access depend on the decisions that are made in relation to it, the specific tactics and strategies that are adopted, the particular conjunctions of time, situation and context in which such practices, actions and activities take place, and the networks, relationships and flows of culture, community, society and economics they encourage, mobilize and make possible. Open access publishing is thus not necessarily a mode of left resistance.

Nevertheless, what is interesting about the transition to the open access publication and archiving of research is the way it is creating at least some ‘openings’ that allow academics to destabilize and rethink scholarly publishing, and with it the university, beyond the model espoused by free-market capitalism….”

Virginia Woolf’s Personal Photo Album Digitized & Put Online by Harvard | Open Culture

“…Like an avid Instragrammer—or like my mother and probably yours—Woolf kept careful record of her life in photo albums, which now reside at Harvard’s Houghton Library. The Monk’s House albums, numbered 1-6, contain images of Woolf, her family, and her many friends, including such famous members of the Bloomsbury group as E.M. Forster (above, top), John Maynard Keynes, and Lytton Strachey (below, with Woolf and W.B. Yeats, and playing chess with sister Marjorie). Harvard has digitized one album, Monk’s House 4, dated 1939 on the cover. You can view its scanned pages at their library site….”

Permafree on Amazon: How and Why to Give Your Book Away, Plus My Results – Side Hustle Nation

“Why go through all the trouble of writing a book, only to give it away?

Answer: To build an audience.

As we’ve seen in case study after case study, doing business online becomes much easier and much more profitable if you have a built-in audience who loves your work.

I made the case that having a “permafree” book on Amazon is the equivalent of guest blogging on steroids. It’s one of the most highly-trafficked sites in the world, which means the potential to get tens of thousands of eyeballs on your book. You’ll never find a bigger “guest posting” opportunity.

And like a good guest post, your free book can lead people back to your site to learn more about you and opt-in for additional useful content….”

Bringing home a revolution

“Called the Public Archive of Revolutionary Culture, Punjab, they aim to document how theatre in Punjab attained “identity as revolutionary culture in villages of Punjab,” tells Dr Areet, Singh’s younger daughter, who is an eye surgeon with the state’s health department.

The first step in this direction has been taken with an online archive….

The online archive, started recently, has a collection mostly compiled from records available with the family. “This archive,” says Singh’s elder daughter Navsharan Kaur, who is an economist with Delhi’s International Development Research Centre of Canadian Government, “is a small effort with no claims to bring all revolutionary cultural material under one platform in one go. We hope that we will grow through the collective efforts of all those who believe in archiving, learning from history and seriously debating the role of revolutionary culture for social change.” 

The archive will be an open access platform to the students, cultural activists and others to understand, write and develop revolutionary culture in Punjab. “The aim is to see these records used, developed and reconstructed,” says Navsharan….”

Open Folklore

“A partnership of the American Folklore Society and the Indiana University Libraries, Open Folklore is a scholarly resource devoted to increasing the number and variety of open access resources, published and unpublished, that are available for the field of folklore studies and the communities with whom folklore scholars partner….”

Open Marginalis — Open.Marginalis: Tumblr as Platform for Digital Scholarship in Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections

Abstract:  This project overview of Open.Marginalis is an avenue to explore Tumblr as a platform for digital scholarship in libraries, archives, and special collections. As a platform, Tumblr supports clear opportunities for scholarship through flexible display, discovery, and description. Reviewing project goals, operations, and practices, this project overview aims to serve as an accessible point of entry for digital scholarship using this platform.

First subscription journal flips to open access through OLH | Open Library of Humanities

“The Open Library of Humanities is extremely pleased to announce that the Journal of British and Irish Innovative Poetry will be the first subscription journal to move to the completely open-access model offered by the OLH. The journal, previously published by Gylphi, centres on the poetic writings that have appeared in Britain and Ireland since the late 1950s under various categorizations, for example: avant-garde, underground, linguistically innovative, second-wave Modernist, non-mainstream, the British Poetry Revival, the parallel tradition, formally innovative, neo-modernist and experimental, while also including the Cambridge School, the London School, concrete poetry, and performance writing….”