The idea of an open-access evidence rack

“Here’s the idea in three steps.

First, identify the basic propositions in the field or sub-field you want to cover. To start small, identify the basic propositions you want to defend in a given article.

Second, create a separate OA web page for each proposition. For now, don’t worry about the file format or other technicalities. What’s important is that the pages should (1) be easy to update, (2) carry a time-stamp showing when they were last updated, and (3) give each proposition a unique URL. Let’s call them “proposition pages”.

Third, start filling in each page with the evidence in support of its proposition. If some evidence has been published in an article or book, then cite the publication. When the work is online (OA or TA), add a link as well. Whenever you can link directly to evidence, rather than merely to publications describing evidence, do that. For example, some propositions can be supported by linkable data in an open dataset. But because citations and data don’t always speak for themselves, consider adding some annotations to explain how cited pieces of evidence support the given proposition.

Each supporting study or piece of evidence should have an entry to itself. A proposition page should look more like a list than an article. It should look like a list of citations, annotated citations, or bullet points. It should look like a footnote, perhaps a very long footnote, for the good reason that one intended use of a proposition page is to be available for citation and review as a compendious, perpetually updated, public footnote. …”

FAIR Principles

“This page is for elaboration of the individual FAIR Principles, the rationale behind them and the reason they are worded the way they are.  This is also a living document.  The Principles are not intended to be static, and have not be “ratified”.  The principles may change, based on community input and discussion of suggestions among the FAIR Principles Stewardship group.  …”

Dat – Distributed Dataset Synchronization And Versioning

“Dat is a protocol designed for syncing folders of data, even if they are large or changing constantly. A cryptographically secure register of changes to the data over time is used to ensure dataset versions are distributed as exact copies of exact versions. Any byte range of any version of any file can be efficiently streamed from a Dat repository over a network connection. Consumers can choose to fully or partially replicate the contents of a remote Dat repository, and can also subscribe to live changes. Dat uses built-in public key cryptography to encrypt network traffic, allowing it to make certain privacy and security guarantees. A group of Dat clients can connect to each other to form a public or private decentralized network to exchange data amognst each other in a swarm. A reference implementation is provided in JavaScript….”

CREDIT reflects Complete Workflow

“CREDIT is a cloud-enabled SaaS tool for data management to provide an opportunity to authors to register their Additional Research Outputs(AROs) reflecting RAW, REPEAT & NULL/NEGATIVE entities generated at various stages of research workflow to ensure their reusability & gaining credit. Hence contributing towards enriching research articles & reproducible science. CREDIT framework & interface is developed on FAIR data principles….The appearance of these badges happens dynamically, hence creates a possibility that the metrics around the data, when readers engage with it would be fed back to the main published article in real-time (accessible via the badge – Enhancing Discoverability and also giving credits to Authors). And in the near-future we also have plans to roll out Badges that can be embedded in PDF articles….”

Digits receives $60,000 grant to help scholars publish work – The Tartan

“The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded Carnegie Mellon and the University of Pittsburgh an 18-month-long $60,000 grant to support a project known as “Digits.” …The aim of Digits is to optimize the software containers used in publishing scholarly research in order to make it easier and cheaper for scholars to publish their work and maintain it….“Hosting costs, maintenance, peer review, and preservation for non-traditional publications almost always fall upon the original authors; the equivalent duties for print scholarship, instead, are taken up by publishers, libraries, or scholarly organizations,” said the leaders of the project in a co-interview over email with The Tartan….The current digital publication system can lead to issues such as link rot, which happens when scholars change web hosts or let subscriptions expire, making the publications no longer available. “The responsibility of digital preservation needs to be shifted from individual researchers to journal publishers or university archives,” said Lavin in a university press release. Another feature of the project will allow scholars to update their work more easily. “It is often considered double-dipping or even cheating to publish nearly identical research as more data becomes available,” Weingart said in the press release. Thus, the leaders plan to incorporate an update feature into the software infrastructure they develop….”

CMU, Pitt Receive Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant To Plan Platform for Digital Scholarship

“The Andrew. W. Mellon Foundation has awarded Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh an 18-month, $60,000 grant to research the development of a standardized platform for digital scholarship. The award will support “Digits,” a project that will explore how new technologies that make it increasingly easy to publish, share, reproduce and archive complex digital materials can be sustained in a unified and flexible way….Researchers currently invest countless time and resources creating interactive pieces and self-publishing them online. “But scholars might change web hosts or let subscriptions expire,” Lavin said. “This leads to something called link rot. The responsibility of digital preservation needs to be shifted from individual researchers to journal publishers or university archives.” Digits also will allow digital projects and small-scale work to be preserved and updated. “It is often considered double-dipping or even cheating to publish nearly identical research as more data becomes available,” Weingart said. “Digits would provide infrastructure for regularly updating publications, as with an article that relays perpetually current popular opinions about romance fiction based on a large-scale analysis of online reviews.” …”