CAP Model FAQ – PLOS

An FAQ on the PLOS Community Action Publishing (CAP) program.

“In the case of PLOS Medicine and PLOS Biology, the community goal is to cover the costs of the journals (plus a 10% capped margin) by equitably distributing cost, rather than have individual authors pay the high APCs required to cover the cost highly selective publishing. Members of the collective receive the “private benefit” of publishing in both journals with no fees. Authors from non-member institutions are subject to “non-member fees” which increase considerably year-on-year to encourage participation in the collective….”

About the ICOLC Expanded Access Spreadsheet | Google Docs

This Complimentary Expanded Access Specifics (EAS) spreadsheet is designed and maintained on behalf of the ICOLC community by SCELC Library Consortium Licensing Services team staff members: Jason Price, Erik Limpitlaw, and Carly Ryan. 

 

Its purpose is to make information service provider announcements and offers of COVID19-related expanded access to resources more accessible to libraries and their users all over the world.

 

 

On March 13, ICOLC issued a Statement on the Global COVID-19 Pandemic and Its Impact on Library Services and Resources that urged publishers to consider a range of responses. The open letter links to an Information Service Provider Response (ISPR) Registry that is populated by members of the ICOLC community as they learn of these responses.

 

 

Providers, Consortia, or Libraries can recommend complimentary resources for addition to the lists using the ICOLC Complimentary Expanded Access Submission Form. Entries that are added to the EAS sheet are also added to the ISPR registry.

 

Trends for open access to publications | European Commission

“On this page you will find indicators on how the policies of journals and funding agencies favour open access, and the percentage of publications (gold, green, hybrid and bronze) actually available through open access.

The indicators cover bibliometric data on publications, as well as data on funders’ and journals’ policies. Indicators and case studies will be updated over time.

You can download the chart and its data through the dedicated menu within each chart (top right of the image). …”

Julich-Brain: A 3D probabilistic atlas of the human brain’s cytoarchitecture | Science

Abstract:  Cytoarchitecture is a basic principle of microstructural brain parcellation. Here we introduce Julich-Brain, a 3D atlas containing cytoarchitectonic maps of cortical areas and subcortical nuclei. The atlas is probabilistic to consider variations between individual brains. Building such an atlas was highly data- and labor-intensive and required to develop nested, interdependent workflows for detecting borders between brain areas, data processing, provenance tracking, and flexible execution of processing chains to handle large amounts of data at different spatial scales. Gap maps complement cortical maps to achieve full cortical coverage. The atlas concept is dynamic, i.e., continuously adapted with progress in mapping, openly available to support neuroimaging studies of healthy subjects and patients, as well as modeling and simulation, and interoperable, to link with other atlases and recourses.

 

Julich-Brain: A 3D probabilistic atlas of the human brain’s cytoarchitecture | Science

Abstract:  Cytoarchitecture is a basic principle of microstructural brain parcellation. Here we introduce Julich-Brain, a 3D atlas containing cytoarchitectonic maps of cortical areas and subcortical nuclei. The atlas is probabilistic to consider variations between individual brains. Building such an atlas was highly data- and labor-intensive and required to develop nested, interdependent workflows for detecting borders between brain areas, data processing, provenance tracking, and flexible execution of processing chains to handle large amounts of data at different spatial scales. Gap maps complement cortical maps to achieve full cortical coverage. The atlas concept is dynamic, i.e., continuously adapted with progress in mapping, openly available to support neuroimaging studies of healthy subjects and patients, as well as modeling and simulation, and interoperable, to link with other atlases and recourses.

 

Could this be the start of a new era in scholarly communication? – F1000 Blogs

“There are in fact a number of research publishing models in widespread use that are designed precisely to enable rapid publication of new findings (as a preprint does) while assuring expert and transparent peer review to support trust in, and decision-making around, an article’s potential use. F1000Research [13] developed such a publishing model for the life sciences in 2013, with a mandatory requirement that the underlying data and code are made FAIR (Finable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) to support reproducibility of the findings and their use and reuse.  In addition, publications can be updated as new data comes in or new understanding is developed, thereby enabling the publication to track the ongoing research workflow – like a ‘living article’.

This model is now being extended out to all research disciplines, and major funders around the world also now have their own publishing platforms for their grantees utilising this same rapid and transparent publishing model, including Wellcome [14], the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation [15], the Irish Health Research Board [16], and later this year, the European Commission [17]. Indeed these platforms have seen a big upsurge in submissions on COVID-19 during this time due to the obvious benefits of this approach during such an emergency [for examples see 18, 19 and 20]. Furthermore, this model can bring considerable cost and efficiency gains: average article processing charges on Wellcome Open Research are 67% cheaper than the average Wellcome pays to other venues for Open Access [21], and the model enables the publication of a much broader range of outputs, helping to reduce research waste….”

Welcome — The Turing Way

“The Turing Way is an open source community-driven guide to reproducible, ethical, inclusive and collaborative data science.

Our goal is to provide all the information that data scientists in academia, industry, government and in the third sector need at the start of their projects to ensure that they are easy to reproduce and reuse at the end.

The book started as a guide for reproducibility, covering version control, testing, and continuous integration. But technical skills are just one aspect of making data science research “open for all”.

In February 2020, The Turing Way expanded to a series of books covering reproducible research, project design, communication, collaboration, and ethical research.”

A Community Handbook for Open Data Science

“The Turing Way started in December 2018 and has quickly evolved into a collaborative, inclusive and international endeavor with the aim of uncovering gold standards to ensure reproducible, ethical, inclusive and collaborative data science. How did this happen? I think two ingredients were central to The Turing Way‘s success: extraordinary community building and a clear enticing vision….

Anyone can contribute is a central theme. And not only that: anyone can bring ideas to the table. And folks are doing just that. At the time of writing this post 168 people have contributed. So on average the project has gained 9 new contributors every month since it’s initiation….”