Making Early European Books Open Access | On the Trail of the Bianchi of 1399

“The Wellcome Library’s Early Modern European Book collection is currently accessible at Early European Books online. At the moment, you need a login and to physically be in the UK to see these books. The Wellcome are in the process of making 10% of these holdings open access, and I’m getting to choose about 200 volumes for this purpose. Incunabula, so books from the first 50 years of printing, will be automatically included, so I’m looking through the catalogue at books printed after around 1500.

[…]

I’m making a database of the books I’m choosing to show why I’ve selected them, so which criteria they fulfil as well as explaining why that particular volume is exciting. I’ll be blogging about some of the most exciting things I find. For now, I’ll have to go to the rare books room at the Wellcome library to take my own photos, but once this project is complete, you’ll be able to read the selected books online for free.”

OLH flips innovative archaeology conference proceedings to open access journal | Open Library of Humanities

“We are really pleased to announce that in Summer 2017 the OLH will be publishing the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Journal (TRAJ). Formerly an annual conference proceedings volume published primarily by Oxbow Books (a leading publisher within the fields of archaeology and ancient history), the journal developed out of the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference (TRAC), which has been running annually since 1991. As part of this move, we will be making 22 years of the journal’s published catalogue openly available on the OLH platform.

TRAJ is an innovative journal that promotes the use of new theoretical approaches to the Roman past, facilitating fresh interpretations of datasets rather than solely the presentation of archaeological data (as commonly deployed in archaeology scholarship). The publication will build on this strong foundation to continue attracting submissions within the disciplines of Archaeology, Classics and Ancient History, as well as interdisciplinary work drawing on the Biological Sciences, Humanities, and Social Sciences. Having consistently published innovative and thought-provoking papers derived from annual conferences held across Europe and America since 1991, the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference (TRAC) has established a reputation as an unorthodox and radical event in the scholarly calendar, which has had a major impact on the theoretical landscape of Roman Archaeology.”

Acta Mathematica

“Acta Mathematica will be produced and distributed in print and online exclusively by International Press, beginning with volume 218 (2017).

Also, by arrangement with the Institut Mittag-Leffler, International Press now provides fully open online access to the entire content of Acta Mathematica — from its first issue of 1882 to the most recent.”

PBJ is now a leading open access plant journal – Daniell – 2017 – Plant Biotechnology Journal – Wiley Online Library

“Welcome to the first issue of the fifteenth volume of Plant Biotechnology Journal. I would like to start this editorial by announcing the successful transition of PBJ from a subscription-based journal to an open access journal supported exclusively by authors. This resulted in enhanced free global access to all readers. I applaud the PBJ management team for offering free open access to all articles published in this journal in the past 14 years. As the first among the top ten open access plant science journals, based on 2016 citations, PBJ is very likely to be ranked among the top three journals publishing original research. PBJ is now compatible with mobile platforms, tablets, iPads, and iPhones and offers several new options to evaluate short- and long-term impact of published articles, including Altmetric scores, article readership, and citations….”

Harvard Law Library Readies Trove of Decisions for Digital Age – The New York Times

“Shelves of law books are an august symbol of legal practice, and no place, save the Library of Congress, can match the collection at Harvard’s Law School Library. Its trove includes nearly every state, federal, territorial and tribal judicial decision since colonial times — a priceless potential resource for everyone from legal scholars to defense lawyers trying to challenge a criminal conviction.

Now, in a digital-age sacrifice intended to serve grand intentions, the Harvard librarians are slicing off the spines of all but the rarest volumes and feeding some 40 million pages through a high-speed scanner. They are taking this once unthinkable step to create a complete, searchable database of American case law that will be offered free on the Internet, allowing instant retrieval of vital records that usually must be paid for….”