DAISY Publishes White Paper on the Benefits of EPUB 3 – The DAISY Consortium

“The DAISY Consortium has published a white paper encouraging the use of Born Accessible EPUB 3 files for corporate, government and university publications and documents. This important piece of work recognizes the work of the publishing industry who have embraced EPUB 3  as their format of choice for ebooks and digital publishing and focuses on how this same approach should be used for all types of digital content, both online and offline….”

Accessibility in Institutional Repositories

“Report on findings from a survey conducted in Fall 2019 to gauge accessibility practices for digital content made available in institutional repositories. For the purpose of this study, we focus on the digital content collected in institutional repositories and workflows at academic libraries, rather than the websites and software platforms. This study is intended to establish a baseline measurement of current accessibility practices in hopes that studies such as this will help inform the wider community of the challenges and obstacles faced by institutional repository mangers and staff in ensuring accessibility to content.

Anonymized data from this survey is available in the Texas Data Repository. https://doi.org/10.18738/T8/LUGYPO …”

 

Rethinking assessment during the pandemic, particularly re. disability equality | Martin Paul Eve | Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing

The pandemic is not over. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill just went back for a week of in-person term. Seven days later, they have shut down, with over 500 students in isolation. They can now offer only remote tuition. So I repeat to those who are being optimistic about this year: no, the pandemic is not over, it is far from over, and there are many many challenges ahead. In this post I want to turn particularly to the challenge of access to library resources over the coming year for students, with particular reference to the disability equality implications.

SciELO network and accessibility: emphasis on policies, products and services | SciELO in Perspective

“As part of the alignment with open science research communication practices, the SciELO Program initiated an interdisciplinary work plan aimed at promoting accessibility to the SciELO Network products and web services….

Promoting open science and open access is not necessarily synonymous with promoting accessibility. If we do not pay attention to this, and overcome attitudinal, technological, communicational, and programmatic barriers, we will be legitimizing the violation of the individual rights of citizens of different societies on a daily basis to access what has been developed by scientific communities….”

SciELO network and accessibility: emphasis on policies, products and services | SciELO in Perspective

“As part of the alignment with open science research communication practices, the SciELO Program initiated an interdisciplinary work plan aimed at promoting accessibility to the SciELO Network products and web services….

Promoting open science and open access is not necessarily synonymous with promoting accessibility. If we do not pay attention to this, and overcome attitudinal, technological, communicational, and programmatic barriers, we will be legitimizing the violation of the individual rights of citizens of different societies on a daily basis to access what has been developed by scientific communities….”

Open access versus accessibility: evaluating Plan S – Cytotherapy

Abstract:  An ambitious plan was recently proposed by cOAlition S, a consortium of European biomedical research funding agencies, to improve the dissemination of research results across all sectors. This goal was formalized in Plan S, which outlines 10 guiding principles aimed at transforming the current state of scientific publishing ( https://www.coalition-s.org/why-plan-s/). Its principal directive is to eliminate publication paywalls that restrict access to a substantial amount of externally funded research results by scientists and the public. To accomplish this goal, the plan mandates that all cOAlition S-funded research be published in open access journals on open access platforms. Plan S is mandated to begin with proposals submitted for funding consideration in 2021.

 

Web Accessibility in the Institutional Repository: Crafting User-Centered Submission Policies

“As web accessibility initiatives increase across institutions, it is important not only to reframe and rethink policies, but also to develop sustainable and tenable methods for enforcing accessibility efforts. For institutional repositories, it is imperative to determine the extent to which both the repository manager and the user are responsible for depositing accessible content. This presentation allows us to share our accessibility framework and help repository and content managers craft sustainable, long-term goals for accessible content in institutional repositories, while also providing openly available resources for short-term benefit.

Indiana University’s institutional repository, IUScholarWorks, audited the accessibility of its existing content and created policies to encourage accessible submissions. No established workflows considering accessibility existed when this audit took place, and no additional resources were allocated to facilitate this shift in focus. As a result, the Scholarly Communication team altered the repository submission workflow to encourage authors to make their finished documents accessible with limited intervention.

We identified a spectrum of accessibility services, ranging from applying nascent accessibility practices to implementing long term solutions. When initiating new policies, responsibility for accessibility will often fall more heavily upon the user, while ideal practices aim to be more collaborative in nature. Initially, instead of concentrating resources on retroactively deleting non-accessible content, we focused on our submission process, which we believe emphasizes the importance of depositing accessible documents. We created guidelines that allow users to add basic accessibility improvements without needing to significantly restructure or rewrite their document. Our guidelines provide “quick fixes” that authors can easily implement to their finished documents prior to submission, including adding structural tags and alt text, clearly labeling lists, and identifying document language. Moving forward, we aim to implement ideal accessibility standards for deposited work, regardless of format or origin.”

Web Accessibility in the Institutional Repository: Crafting User-Centered Submission Policies

“As web accessibility initiatives increase across institutions, it is important not only to reframe and rethink policies, but also to develop sustainable and tenable methods for enforcing accessibility efforts. For institutional repositories, it is imperative to determine the extent to which both the repository manager and the user are responsible for depositing accessible content. This presentation allows us to share our accessibility framework and help repository and content managers craft sustainable, long-term goals for accessible content in institutional repositories, while also providing openly available resources for short-term benefit.

Indiana University’s institutional repository, IUScholarWorks, audited the accessibility of its existing content and created policies to encourage accessible submissions. No established workflows considering accessibility existed when this audit took place, and no additional resources were allocated to facilitate this shift in focus. As a result, the Scholarly Communication team altered the repository submission workflow to encourage authors to make their finished documents accessible with limited intervention.

We identified a spectrum of accessibility services, ranging from applying nascent accessibility practices to implementing long term solutions. When initiating new policies, responsibility for accessibility will often fall more heavily upon the user, while ideal practices aim to be more collaborative in nature. Initially, instead of concentrating resources on retroactively deleting non-accessible content, we focused on our submission process, which we believe emphasizes the importance of depositing accessible documents. We created guidelines that allow users to add basic accessibility improvements without needing to significantly restructure or rewrite their document. Our guidelines provide “quick fixes” that authors can easily implement to their finished documents prior to submission, including adding structural tags and alt text, clearly labeling lists, and identifying document language. Moving forward, we aim to implement ideal accessibility standards for deposited work, regardless of format or origin.”

Online Survey Software | Qualtrics Survey Solutions

“The purpose of this survey is to collect information from managers of institutional repositories about actions currently being taken to support accessibility of the platform and associated documents. By “accessibility,” the study refers to guidelines such as WCAG 2.0 that ensure website access for people of all abilities….”