Collaborating for public access to scholarly publications: A case study of the partnership between the US Department of Energy and CHORUS – Dylla – – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Key points

 

The success of the CHORUS and DOE relationship is the result of nearly two decades of interactions between the DOE and a group of scientific publishers.
The relationship between CHORUS and the US federal agencies required understanding of different motivations, operations, and philosophies.
Although achieving public access was simple in principle, it required considerable effort to develop systems that satisfied all parties.
Publishers had been working with federal agencies to achieve open access before the 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, but this helped to create a path for a more fruitful relationship….”

Covid-19 Changed How the World Does Science, Together

Never before, scientists say, have so many of the world’s researchers focused so urgently on a single topic. Nearly all other research has ground to a halt.

Covid-19 Changed How the World Does Science, Together – The New York Times

“While political leaders have locked their borders, scientists have been shattering theirs, creating a global collaboration unlike any in history. Never before, researchers say, have so many experts in so many countries focused simultaneously on a single topic and with such urgency. Nearly all other research has ground to a halt….

One small measure of openness can be found on the servers of medRxiv and bioRxiv, two online archives that share academic research before it has been reviewed and published in journals. The archives have been deluged with coronavirus research from across the globe. Despite the nationalistic tone set by the Chinese president, Xi Jinping, Chinese researchers have contributed a significant portion of the coronavirus research available in the archive….”

Covid-19 Changed How the World Does Science, Together – The New York Times

“While political leaders have locked their borders, scientists have been shattering theirs, creating a global collaboration unlike any in history. Never before, researchers say, have so many experts in so many countries focused simultaneously on a single topic and with such urgency. Nearly all other research has ground to a halt….

One small measure of openness can be found on the servers of medRxiv and bioRxiv, two online archives that share academic research before it has been reviewed and published in journals. The archives have been deluged with coronavirus research from across the globe. Despite the nationalistic tone set by the Chinese president, Xi Jinping, Chinese researchers have contributed a significant portion of the coronavirus research available in the archive….”

Covid-19 Changed How the World Does Science, Together

Never before, scientists say, have so many of the world’s researchers focused so urgently on a single topic. Nearly all other research has ground to a halt.

UNESCO mobilizes 122 countries to promote open science and reinforced cooperation in the face of COVID-19

“UNESCO on 30 March hosted an online meeting of representatives of ministries in charge of science all over the world. Participants included 77 ministers, including governmental secretaries representing a total of 122 countries, as well as Mariya Gabriel, European Commissioner for Innovation, Research, Culture, Education and Youth, Sarah Anyang Agbor, African Union Commissioner for Human Resources, Science and Technology, Moisés Omar Halleslevens Acevedo, former Vice President of Nicaragua and Dr Soumya Swaminathan, the World Health Organization’s Chief Scientist. 

The objective of the meeting was to exchange views on the role of international cooperation in science and increased investment in the context of COVID-19.

The key issue of open science, for which UNESCO has been working on an International Recommendation since November 2019, was a major topic of discussion….”

UNESCO mobilizes 122 countries to promote open science and reinforced cooperation in the face of COVID-19

“UNESCO on 30 March hosted an online meeting of representatives of ministries in charge of science all over the world. Participants included 77 ministers, including governmental secretaries representing a total of 122 countries, as well as Mariya Gabriel, European Commissioner for Innovation, Research, Culture, Education and Youth, Sarah Anyang Agbor, African Union Commissioner for Human Resources, Science and Technology, Moisés Omar Halleslevens Acevedo, former Vice President of Nicaragua and Dr Soumya Swaminathan, the World Health Organization’s Chief Scientist. 

The objective of the meeting was to exchange views on the role of international cooperation in science and increased investment in the context of COVID-19.

The key issue of open science, for which UNESCO has been working on an International Recommendation since November 2019, was a major topic of discussion….”

Embracing complexity: COVID-19 is a case for academic collaboration and co-creation · Elephant in the Lab

“Over the past 10 years, my colleagues and I have been doing research on research, on how academic knowledge is created (i.e. scholarly communication) and disseminated (i.e. research communication). We have been looking at how researchers collaborate and share data (here, here and here), how they perform quality checks (here), where they publish and how they engage with the public (here and here). Perhaps the most important insight I have gained over the years is that scholarly impact is a matter of complexity and that attempts by researchers to avoid complexity may ultimately reduce the impact of their work. As serious as the COVID-19 situation is, I believe that the pandemic can be an opportunity for research to embrace complexity and to prove that things can be done better. And the good news is that it is happening right now, as I write! …

There are, of course, very good examples of interdisciplinarity, of scientists who subscribe to the principles of open science and who are questioning the outdated infrastructures for scholarly communication. …

And as serious as the situation is, when the crisis is over and its history is being written, COVID-19 could go down as a turning point for open science and purposeful science communication. And it could awaken our dormant institutions from their slumber and prompt a long overdue change….”

Home | The OA Switchboard Initiative

“The OA Switchboard initiative is a collaboration between funders, institutions and publishers to facilitate the fulfilment of open access strategies across business models, policies and agreements. When operational, the OA Switchboard will be a central hub connecting systems and improving open access-related article-level information exchange between authors, publishers, funders and institutions.?

The OA Switchboard aims to reduce complexity for all stakeholders, so the ecosystem can work better for everyone, and can learn, adjust and progress….”

Collaborate on Open Access Publishing Infrastructure in Africa with Coko, WACREN and EIFL : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“If you want to work collaboratively to design free and open source open access publishing infrastructure in Africa, please get out your diary! On Tuesday, March 17 in Cotonou (Benin), please plan to join Coko Founder Adam Hyde, WACREN’s Omo Oaiya, and Iryna Kuchma from EIFL for a workshop on the subject. Registration is open to all (publishers, researchers, technologists), and free. At the same time, if travel cost is a burden, some limited funding is available, so please reach out.

Attendees can expect to participate in the following:

To conduct a high-level audit of needs for open access scholarly publishing in Africa (open source tools and services for publishing books, journals, textbooks, micropublications)
To discuss training needs and define training and support programmes
To share experiences and identify areas for collaborations around shared free and open source open access publishing infrastructure
To frame the Coalition for Open Access Publishing Infrastructures in Africa: tools, training, hosting and advice across Africa for all those that want it…”