Help us improving the indicators!

“The Open Science Monitor tracks the development of open science trends in Europe.

Initially launched in 2017 to support the EU policies, the OSM has been revamped in May 2018 with updated data and visual identity. But open science is continuously developing, and over the next months, new trends, indicators, and data will be added. 

We need the input of the open science community to improve the indicators and identify new data sources, as illustrated in the methodological note (pdf). Below, you can comment on the individual indicators of the OSM. Your comments will help improve the Open Science Monitor….

This consultation will remain open for the full duration of the project, but in order to actually improve the methodology, the deadline for contribution is August 31st, 2018….”

Open science monitor | European Commission

“The Open Science Monitor aims to

  • provide data and insight to understand the development of open science in Europe
  • gather the most relevant and timely indicators on the development of open science in Europe and other global partner countries

The Open Science Monitor will also support European Commission initiatives such as the Open Science Policy Platform and the Open Science Cloud….

The Open Science Monitor will be updated on a regular basis in the course of the project, until the end of 2019. Over the next months, new indicators and data will be uploaded….

The Open Science Monitor is a collaborative effort and welcomes the contribution of the community. You can read the methodological note below, and provide your comments online on how to improve the specific indicators….

Roads and Bridges: The Unseen Labor Behind Our Digital Infrastructure / Ford Foundation

“Nearly all software today relies on free, public code, written and maintained by communities of developers and other talent. This code can be used by anyone—from companies to individuals—to write their own software. Shared, public code makes up the digital infrastructure of our society today….

Just like physical infrastructure, digital infrastructure needs regular upkeep and maintenance. But financial support for digital infrastructure is much harder to come by.

In the face of unprecedented demand, the costs of not supporting our digital infrastructure are numerous. No individual company or organization is incentivized to address the public good problem alone. In order to support our digital infrastructure, we must find ways to work together.

Sustaining our digital infrastructure is a new topic for many, and the challenges are not well understood. In this report, Nadia Eghbal unpacks the unique challenges facing digital infrastructure, and how we might work together to address them….”

 

Joint Roadmap for Open Science Tools

“We propose an effort to develop a “Joint Roadmap for Open Science Tools”. This will be delivered by an informal group of like-minded organizations coming together around a common purpose.

Our objectives will be to deliver:

  • A vision for the toolchain or dashboard of the researcher of the future
  • A mission for what we hope to achieve and how we can work together
  • A set of user stories that together describe the problems we want to solve
  • A preliminary roadmap for how the known existing projects can come together
  • Next steps

Why

There is a growing category of open science technologies and services stewarded by non-profit organizations that are targeting the key needs and requirements of scholarly production, publishing, dissemination and collaboration. However, to date, the major projects in this category have not made a unified effort to come together, compare notes, and identify areas of cooperation and integration. As leaders of these projects ourselves, we are aware there are obvious synergies that are not being pursued, and likely many others still waiting to be discovered. Moreover, there is no holistic vision or overall game plan about what the researcher experience of the future should or could be that these projects can support….

We are focusing on open tools and services delivered by non-profit organizations because we know from our own experience that there is a shared sense of mission and a willingness to collaborate openly between these teams that are often lacking in their for-profit counterparts. These groups are actively building and delivering solutions, and thus have product roadmaps that they can speak authoritatively to. It is also critical that researchers participate because their needs and perspective drives the demand for what we’re doing, and thus our goals….”

The Greatest Generational Impact: Open Neuroscience as an Emerging Knowledge Commons (Chapter 8) – Governing Medical Knowledge Commons

“Neuroscience is transforming. Brain data collected in multitudes of individuals and institutions around the world are being openly shared, moved from office desks and personal storage devices to institutionally supported cloud systems and public repositories – effectively bringing Neuroscience into the era of Big Data. This is an important evolution in Neuroscience, since the value of open data sharing has not always been recognized.”

The Greatest Generational Impact: Open Neuroscience as an Emerging Knowledge Commons (Chapter 8) – Governing Medical Knowledge Commons

“Neuroscience is transforming. Brain data collected in multitudes of individuals and institutions around the world are being openly shared, moved from office desks and personal storage devices to institutionally supported cloud systems and public repositories – effectively bringing Neuroscience into the era of Big Data. This is an important evolution in Neuroscience, since the value of open data sharing has not always been recognized.”

Recording and Slides: Open Access in the global South: Perspectives from the Open and Collaborative Science in Development Network

“The recording and the slides from today’s webinar entitled Open Access in the global South: Perspectives from the Open and Collaborative Science in Development Network are now available on Zenodo. Prof. Leslie Chan shared key lessons from OCSDNet which is a research network with scientists, development practitioners, community members and activists from 26 countries in Latin America, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Based on OCS experience, he questioned openness and public good, discussed open science definition beyond academy. Prof Chan also highlighted that principles as in the definition of Next Generation Repository should be guiding the technology and the infrastructures, not the other way around.”