Popular preprint servers face closure because of money troubles

“The rise of preprint repositories has helped scientists worldwide to share results and get feedback quickly. But several platforms that serve researchers in emerging economies are struggling to raise money to stay afloat. One, which hosts research from Indonesia, has decided to close because of this funding shortfall.

INA-Rxiv, which was set up in 2017, was one of the first repositories to host studies from a particular region. Previous platforms served specific disciplines: for example, arXiv, the original preprint repository, hosts physical-sciences research, and bioRxiv is a popular repository for biology studies. Other region or language-specific repositories followed, including ArabiXiv, which hosts Arabic-language research; AfricArxiv and IndiaRxiv. Managers of these repositories say they increase exposure for research from the regions, and facilitate collaborations.

INA-Rxiv, ArabiXiv, AfricArxiv and IndiaRxiv are run by volunteers around the world, but the servers are hosted online by the non-profit Center for Open Science (COS), based in Charlottesville, Virginia. The centre’s platform hosts 26 repositories, including more than a dozen that are discipline-specific.

In December 2018, the COS informed repository managers that from 2020, it would be introducing fees, charged to repository managers, to cover maintenance costs. The charges, which were finalized last December, start at about US$1,000 a year, and increase as repositories’ annual submissions grow….”

OCLE: A European open access database on climate change effects on littoral and oceanic ecosystems – ScienceDirect

“Studies on historical and future distribution of marine species are frequently limited by the lack of relevant data on abiotic components (IPCC, 2014), especially when working over large areas (Robinson et al., 2017). Important advances have been achieved in the last years regarding availability of global information on physical and chemical driven forces affecting species distributions. WorldClim (Hijmans et al., 2005) marked a milestone in terrestrial species distribution studies, as it opened the opportunity to address global research studies with high resolution. Other databases including historical and projected variables in the terrestrial environment, mainly temperature and precipitation, such as Climond (Kriticos et al., 2012), Climate wizard (Girvetz et al., 2009) or Chelsea (Karger et al., 2016) have emerged recently. However, in the marine environment the number of global databases is limited. Bio-Oracle is the most valuable reference because it provides surface and benthic layers for water temperature, salinity, nutrients, chlorophyll, sea ice, current velocity, phytoplankton, primary productivity, iron and light at high resolution and global coverage (Assis et al., 2017; Tyberghein et al., 2012). Other remarkable databases are MARSPEC (Sbrocco and Barber, 2013), offering variables derived from bathymetry, slope, salinity and sea surface temperature, Aquamaps (Ready et al., 2010), focused on marine animals, or Hexacoral (Fautin and Buddemeier, 2002), with the aim to understand spatial and temporal patterns in biogeochemistry and biogeography. Some databases cover both land and sea areas, such as the MERRAclim (Vega et al., 2017), which offers decadal data of 19 derived variables of air temperature and humidity atmospheric water vapour….

Trying to comply with these requirements and using the best data available, to our best knowledge, this study presents the open access database on climate change effects on littoral and oceanic ecosystems (OCLE), an ecological-driven database of present and future hazards for marine life in Europe….”

Maritime Studies | Home page

“As of January 1, 2018, Maritime Studies has transitioned from an Open Access journal to a subscription-based journal with a hybrid Open Access option. Maritime Studies continues to be published by Springer Nature and an archive of all articles previously published in the journal is hosted here. All submissions going forward will be considered for the subscription-based journal.”

RNLI launches an Open Data site! — Esri UK

Open Data and the ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World were hot topics at our Esri UK conference last month. We showcased the power of using The Royal National Lifeboat Institution’s Open Data and The Living Atlas to perform real-world analysis in our opening plenary

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) provides a 24-hour service in the UK and Ireland and have saved over 142,200 lives since 1824.

The RNLI uses ArcGIS to analyse risk which enables them to save more lives through innovation, data analysis, and new technology. The next step to share knowledge is to make their data public, which is why the RNLI have released Open Data.

Ocean Tool for Public Understanding and Science

“The Ocean Tool for Public Understanding and Science (OcToPUS) is a research initiative at the University of Oxford located at the Department of Zoology and initiated through the Oxford Martin School Programme on Sustainable Oceans (http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/research/programmes/sustainable-oceans). We aim to support scienti c study, monitoring, policy and decision-making related to the management of the oceans….

OcToPUS relies on established free and open-source geospatial technology to provide interactive access to dynamically updated, multi-dimensional data on the marine environment. A retrospective approach to big data archives allows us to present information on temporal trends and variability in ocean phenomena and to identify hotspots of change in the oceans….”

What’s the Best Way to Responsibly Collect Ocean Data? – Eos

“Workshop participants determined that the path forward centers on the adoption of the Ocean Best Practices (OBP) “repository,” developed by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (UNESCO-IODE). The UNESCO-IODE repository is a sustained, open access, and internationally recognized store of standard operating procedures, manuals, operating guidelines, and documentation of methods. It is focused on offering to the ocean community the best practices that have repeatedly produced superior results relative to other methodologies with the same objective and applied in the same environmental context….”

What’s the Best Way to Responsibly Collect Ocean Data? – Eos

“Workshop participants determined that the path forward centers on the adoption of the Ocean Best Practices (OBP) “repository,” developed by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (UNESCO-IODE). The UNESCO-IODE repository is a sustained, open access, and internationally recognized store of standard operating procedures, manuals, operating guidelines, and documentation of methods. It is focused on offering to the ocean community the best practices that have repeatedly produced superior results relative to other methodologies with the same objective and applied in the same environmental context….”

“Utility of primary scientific literature to environmental managers”

A November 2017 study found that “limiting our search to all ‘articles’ and ‘reviews’ published between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2012. … only 43% of primary scientific articles and 50% of review papers relating to coral dominated MPAs [marine protected areas] were freely accessible to decision makers” but didn’t seem to be aware that “SCOPUS only has 29.18% coverage of the DOAJ Open Access titles.”

Tear Down That Paywall: The Movement to Make Ocean Research Free — Oceans Deeply

“As scientists race to save coral reefs and tackle other crucial marine issues, access to expensive scientific journals has become a roadblock to sharing knowledge, especially for researchers in developing countries….

…Open Communications for The Ocean (OCTO), a Woodinville, Washington-based nonprofit that recently launched a marine science research “repository” called MarXiv. Its goal is to systematically make more marine research freely accessible….”