2020 in review: A year in Open Science policy  – Science & research news | Frontiers

“How to begin to summarize what 2020?has?meant for policy and science? It feels like a decade’s worth of catastrophic news and disruption, followed by unprecedented innovative responses.  It was also the year that proved?beyond?doubt?that access to scientific knowledge must be free and immediately open to effectively address the challenges faced by society….

However,?progress was made in Open Science in 2020: ? 

In the US,?meetings with stakeholders?and?a public round of evidence gathering?occured?to prepare for an?executive order mandating OA?for?federally funded research.?No tangible result has emerged, yet?it catalyzed grassroots support for: #OAintheUSA. Expectations are that the incoming Biden administration will pick up the initiative.? 

UNESCO conducted a?global consultation of the academic community?over the summer?to prepare a?Recommendation on?Open Science, for adoption in 2021.?Similarly,?in October,?the World Health?Organization?(WHO), UNESCO,?and the?UN High Commissioner for Human Rights?statement?issued a?joint call for Open Science,?to which we offered our support.?? 

In November, the UN launched a new partnership of publishers committed to the Sustainable Development Goals,?the SDG Publishers Compact. Frontiers and other signatories committed?to promoting research and education and to work inside and outside the company to support the SDGs.  

Frontiers joined?the Initiative for?Open Abstracts (I4OA),?which advocates for the?unrestricted availability of abstracts in scholarly communications.?By joining I4OA, our abstracts will be deposited on?Crossref, adding a layer of support to the OA community’s mission to make all science open.? …”

Evaluation of the UNESCO Recommendation Concerning Open Educational Resources

Abstract:  Open Educational Resources (OER) “are learning, teaching and research materials in any format and medium that reside in the public domain or are under copyright that have been released under an open license, that permit no-cost access, re-use, re-purpose, adaptation and redistribution by others” (UNESCO). In November 2019, UNESCO adopted a resolution on OER that had five objectives:

1. Building capacity of stakeholders to create access, use, adapt and redistribute OER;

2. Developing supportive policy;

3. Encouraging inclusive and equitable quality OER;

4. Nurturing the creation of sustainability models for OER; and

5. Facilitating international cooperation.

Overall this policy represents well the state of the art in OER and would serve to further the aims and objectives of open online education. Having said that, the document suffers from numerous cases of ambiguous terminology, some of it in places where serious misunderstandings could arise. The purpose of this article is to review this resolution, highlighting areas of ambiguity or where further discussion is needed in the OER community.

UNESCO launches new publication on accessible documentary heritage

“Marking the International Day of Persons with Disabilities on 3 December 2020, UNESCO has released a new publication aiming at assisting stakeholders in the preparation of documentary heritage in accessible formats for persons with disabilities.

 

The publication, Accessible Documentary Heritage, offers a set of guidelines for parties involved in the digitization of heritage documents, including librarians, archivists, museums workers, curators, and other stakeholders in carefully planning digital platforms and contents with a view to incorporating disability and accessibility aspects….”

Webinar | Open Science & the Decolonization of Knowledge: Europe-N.America Tickets, Fri, 20 Nov 2020 at 9:00 AM | Eventbrite

“The Canadian Commission for UNESCO and the UNESCO Chair in Community-Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education are collaborating in supporting an international webinar series in support of the UNESCO consultations on the creation of a Recommendation on Open Science, an international normative document to be adopted by the UNESCO General Conference in November of 2021. The webinar series is based on a brief prepared by Florence Piron (Université Laval), Leslie Chan (University of Toronto), Lorna Williams (University of Victoria, Lil’wat First Nation), Rajesh Tandon (PRIA India) and Budd Hall (University of Victoria). The title of the brief is “Open Science Beyond Open Access: For and With Communities A Step Towards the Decolonization of Knowledge”. Available here: https://zenodo.org/record/3946773#.X2uYDWhKiUk …”

Webinar | Open Science & the Decolonization of Knowledge: Europe-N.America Tickets, Fri, 20 Nov 2020 at 9:00 AM | Eventbrite

“The Canadian Commission for UNESCO and the UNESCO Chair in Community-Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education are collaborating in supporting an international webinar series in support of the UNESCO consultations on the creation of a Recommendation on Open Science, an international normative document to be adopted by the UNESCO General Conference in November of 2021. The webinar series is based on a brief prepared by Florence Piron (Université Laval), Leslie Chan (University of Toronto), Lorna Williams (University of Victoria, Lil’wat First Nation), Rajesh Tandon (PRIA India) and Budd Hall (University of Victoria). The title of the brief is “Open Science Beyond Open Access: For and With Communities A Step Towards the Decolonization of Knowledge”. Available here: https://zenodo.org/record/3946773#.X2uYDWhKiUk …”

Preliminary report on the first draft of the Recommendation on Open Science – UNESCO Digital Library

UNESCO

1. Adopts thé présent Recommendation on Open Science on this day of… November2021;

2. Recommends that Member States apply thé provisions of this Recommendation by taking appropriate steps, including whatever législative or other measures maybe required, in conformity with thé constitutional practice and governing structures of each State, to give effect within their jurisdictions to thé principles of thé Recommendation;

3. Also recommends that Member States bring thé Recommendation to thé attentionof thé authorities and bodies responsible for science, technology and innovation,and consult relevant actors concerned with Open Science;

4. Further recommends that Member States report to it, at such dates and in suchmanner as shall be determined, on thé action taken in pursuance of this Recommendation….”

Preliminary report on the first draft of the Recommendation on Open Science – UNESCO Digital Library

UNESCO

1. Adopts thé présent Recommendation on Open Science on this day of… November2021;

2. Recommends that Member States apply thé provisions of this Recommendation by taking appropriate steps, including whatever législative or other measures maybe required, in conformity with thé constitutional practice and governing structures of each State, to give effect within their jurisdictions to thé principles of thé Recommendation;

3. Also recommends that Member States bring thé Recommendation to thé attentionof thé authorities and bodies responsible for science, technology and innovation,and consult relevant actors concerned with Open Science;

4. Further recommends that Member States report to it, at such dates and in suchmanner as shall be determined, on thé action taken in pursuance of this Recommendation….”

Open Science

“The idea behind Open Science is to allow scientific information, data and outputs to be more widely accessible (Open Access) and more reliably harnessed (Open Data) with the active engagement of all the stakeholders (Open to Society).

By encouraging science to be more connected to societal needs and by promoting equal opportunities for all (scientists, policy-makers and citizens), Open Science can be a true game changer in bridging the science, technology and innovation gaps between and within countries and fulfilling the human right to science.

In the context of pressing planetary and socio-economic challenges, sustainable and innovative solutions require an efficient, transparent and vibrant scientific effort – not only stemming from the scientific community, but from the whole society. The recent response of the scientific community to the COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated very well, how open science can accelerate the achievement of scientific solutions for a global challenge.

The Open Science movement has emerged from the scientific community and has rapidly spread across nations, calling for the opening of the gates of knowledge. Investors, entrepreneurs, policy makers and citizens are joining this call. However, in the fragmented scientific and policy environment, a global understanding of the meaning, opportunities and challenges of Open Science is still missing.

UNESCO, as the United Nations Agency with a mandate for Science, is the legitimate global organization enabled to build a coherent vision of Open Science and a shared set of overarching principles and shared values. That is why, at the 40th session of UNESCO’s General Conference, 193 Members States tasked the Organization with the development of an international standard-setting instrument on Open Science in the form of a UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science….”

Open Science

“The idea behind Open Science is to allow scientific information, data and outputs to be more widely accessible (Open Access) and more reliably harnessed (Open Data) with the active engagement of all the stakeholders (Open to Society).

By encouraging science to be more connected to societal needs and by promoting equal opportunities for all (scientists, policy-makers and citizens), Open Science can be a true game changer in bridging the science, technology and innovation gaps between and within countries and fulfilling the human right to science.

In the context of pressing planetary and socio-economic challenges, sustainable and innovative solutions require an efficient, transparent and vibrant scientific effort – not only stemming from the scientific community, but from the whole society. The recent response of the scientific community to the COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated very well, how open science can accelerate the achievement of scientific solutions for a global challenge.

The Open Science movement has emerged from the scientific community and has rapidly spread across nations, calling for the opening of the gates of knowledge. Investors, entrepreneurs, policy makers and citizens are joining this call. However, in the fragmented scientific and policy environment, a global understanding of the meaning, opportunities and challenges of Open Science is still missing.

UNESCO, as the United Nations Agency with a mandate for Science, is the legitimate global organization enabled to build a coherent vision of Open Science and a shared set of overarching principles and shared values. That is why, at the 40th session of UNESCO’s General Conference, 193 Members States tasked the Organization with the development of an international standard-setting instrument on Open Science in the form of a UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science….”

Preliminary report on the first draft of the Recommendation on Open Science – UNESCO Digital Library

“To achieve its aim, thé key objectives and areas of action of this Recommendation areas follows: (l) promoting a common understanding of Open Science and diverse paths to OpenScience; (ii) developing an enabling policy environment for Open Science; (iii) investing in Open Science infrastructures; (iv) investing in capacity building for Open Science; (v) transforming scientific culture and aligning incentives for Open Science; (vi) promoting innovative approaches for Open Science at différent stages of thé scientific process; (vii) promoting international coopération on Open Science….”