Trump Administration May Dismantle Scientific Paywalls

“The federal government spends billions of dollars of your money every year funding scientific research. And yet, in many cases, when the results of that research are published, it can take a full year before the public can read those results for free. The Trump administration wants to change that, making all taxpayer-funded research available immediately, but publishing companies aren’t happy about it.”

OASPA Webinar: PhD students take on openness and academic culture – webinar key takeaways – OASPA

“Following on from this week’s webinar entitled PhD students take on openness and academic culture, we asked our speakers to summarise their talks by offering a few key takeaways, which you can find below. This may be useful for those who missed it or wish to share with colleagues. You can also access the full audio recording.

We have also asked speakers to respond to the questions that were posed by attendees via the webinar chat.  Those questions and answers will be posted directly under the takeaways in a short while….”

Strong Ideas from MIT Libraries and the MIT Press – MIT Press Podcast

“In this episode, Gita Manaktala, Editorial Director at the MIT Press, and Ellen Finnie, Co-Interim Associate Director for Collections at MIT Libraries, discuss the Ideas series: a hybrid print and open access book series for general readers, that provides fresh, strongly argued, and provocative views of the effects of digital technology on culture, business, government, education, and our lives….”

Strong Ideas from MIT Libraries and the MIT Press – MIT Press Podcast

“In this episode, Gita Manaktala, Editorial Director at the MIT Press, and Ellen Finnie, Co-Interim Associate Director for Collections at MIT Libraries, discuss the Ideas series: a hybrid print and open access book series for general readers, that provides fresh, strongly argued, and provocative views of the effects of digital technology on culture, business, government, education, and our lives….”

The Liberation of Science – with Jon Tennant

“Open science for some people it is just science done correctly. For others it is the revolutionary change in the whole academic culture. These different perspectives are highly dependent on your views on the role of science in society, who your advisers were which fields your were in, which career stages you reached, and where you live and work.

In this episode I talk with Dr. Jon Tennant about open science. He is a paleontologist who is now predominantly active in building an Open Science community. He has published several articles on open science and initiated the Open Science MOOC, among many other activities….”

The In/Visible, In/Audible Labor of Digitizing the Public Domain

Abstract:  In this article I call for more recognition of and scholarly engagement with public, volunteer digital humanities projects, using the example of LibriVox.org to consider what public, sustainable, digital humanities work can look like beyond the contexts of institutional sponsorship. Thousands of volunteers are using LibriVox to collaboratively produce free audiobook versions of texts in the US public domain. The work of finding, selecting, and preparing texts to be digitized and published in audio form is complex and slow, and not all of this labor is ultimately visible, valued, or rewarded. Drawing on an ethnographic study of 12 years of archived discourse and documentation, I interrogate digital traces of the processes by which several LibriVox versions of Anne of Green Gables have come into being, watching for ways in which policies and infrastructure have been influenced by variously visible and invisible forms of work. Making visible the intricate, unique, archived experiences of the crowdsourcing community of LibriVox volunteers and their tools adds to still-emerging discussions about how to value extra-institutional, public, distributed digital humanities work.

A Closer Look at Open Educational Resources | Cult of Pedagogy

“In our podcast interview, which you can listen to above, Karen and I talk about how OERs have gotten really, really good over the last few years, what some new platforms are doing to solve the quality problem, and where teachers can go to find outstanding materials—from single-use resources to full-year curricula—that are 100% free….”

Meet Mike Eisen | Podcasts | Naked Scientists

In 2019, eLife appointed UC Berkeley geneticist Mike Eisen as the new Editor-in-Chief. His role is to drive the on-going development of eLife and steer the journal through the evolving landscape of science publishing. Ever since his institutional library thwarted his efforts, over 20 years ago, to download papers for his research project, Eisen has been a powerful proponent of the value of the open access movement. Chris Smith went to see him to hear his views on how science publishing needs to change, what he has planned for eLife, and how he almost became a radio sports commentator….”

Much to say about editors! – Editoria

Editoria afficinados will know that the web based word processor that makes our color-coded track changes (and many others) dreams come true is actually a PubSweet component called Wax. And PubSweet pros will know that the component is based on the Substance editor libraries. Still, there are many more layers, both inside Coko technology, and out.

Open source collaborative editors are a very specialized domain. Recently, Coko’s lead PubSweet Developer Jure Triglav wrote a very detailed landscape view of all of the different editor options available in this space.

Also, Coko is working on creating a version of Wax that built against the ProseMirror library, and will be integrated in to Editoria in future. Christos Kokosias is the Lead Wax Developer and specializes in this area. Recently, Coko Co-founder Adam Hyde sat down with Christos to talk about editors. You can listen in!…”