Elsevier Progresses in Open-Access Deal Making | The Scientist Magazine®

“Last summer, dozens of academic institutions in Sweden let their Elsevier subscriptions lapse, forgoing permission to read new content in the scholarly publisher’s journals. Like other groups in Europe and the US, they were pushing for increased open access and contained costs—and had reached a deadlock in negotiations with the publisher. On Friday (November 22), the two sides announced that they had finally come to an agreement, establishing a so-called transformative deal that includes access to paywalled articles and open-accessing publishing into one fee….”

[Quoting] Wilhelm Widmark, the library director at Stockholm University and a member of the steering committee for the Bibsam consortium, which negotiates on behalf of more than 80 Swedish institutions. “I think Elsevier has become more flexible during the last couple of months.”

Just a day before the Swedish deal was made public, Elsevier and Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania announced a similar deal. These are the latest of several agreements Elsevier has forged to pilot open-access elements since the beginning of 2019. Earlier this year, for example, Hungary and Norway—both countries that had cancelled their subscriptions with the publisher after stagnant negotiations—also announced new contracts with the publisher….

As Elsevier is successfully forging deals on both sides of the Atlantic, there are still two major academic groups missing from these announcements: the University of California (UC) system, which includes 10 campuses, and Project DEAL, which represents around 700 academic institutions in Germany….”

?New transformative agreement with Elsevier enables unlimited open access to Swedish research – Kungliga biblioteket – Sveriges nationalbibliotek – kb.se

“The Bibsam Consortium is signing a Read & Publish agreement with the scientific publisher Elsevier. This means that Swedish researchers will have access to the publisher’s 2000 journals once more. In addition, all Swedish research articles will be published open access….

The previous agreement with Elsevier was terminated in 2018, as Bibsam and Elsevier were unable to reach a solution that met both parties’ requirements for sustainable prices and open access. But after negotiations, a new agreement is now in place that meets Bibsam’s requirements and reflects fair value for both sides….

The key elements of the new agreement are:

Unlimited open access publishing in Elsevier hybrid and fully gold titles, society journals, and fully gold Cell Press and The Lancet titles
A unique pilot centred around open access publishing of 100 articles per year in Cell Press hybrid journals, which covers the entire consortium’s publication output in these journals
Reading rights to the Science Direct Freedom Collection (approximately 2,000 journals) from 1995, and as an additional option Cell Press (14 journals)
Publishing with CC-BY license (or another open license, according to the author’s wishes)….”

 

#OpenGLAMnow: an upcoming series of webinars to learn to do open at your institution

“We interviewed Larissa Borck for the upcoming series of webinars that the Swedish National Heritage Board will be hosting around Open GLAM and how to open up your digital collection. The webinars will be happening between October and November at morning European time, but they will be recorded and made available. We wanted to explore with Larissa what’s the idea of the webinars, what they expect to obtain from it, and what are their plans for the future….”

Moedas: Europe should lead negotiations with academic publishers | Times Higher Education (THE)

“The European Union’s outgoing research chief has called on nations to strike deals with academic publishers together, rather than negotiating country by country and weakening their power.

Carlos Moedas, who is at the end of a five-year term as European commissioner for research, science and innovation, told Times Higher Education that negotiating with publishers was a “great example” of something the EU should take on.

In recent years several European countries including Germany, Norway and Sweden have been locked in talks with big academic publishers such as Elsevier and Springer Nature in an attempt to shift towards open access and drive down costs….

“I think that should be done at the level of the union. This is a great example of added value,” he said, referring to an area where it made sense for the EU, rather than nation states, to take the lead….”

New Read & Publish agre­e­ment publicly avai­lab­le – Kungliga biblioteket – kb.se

“46 organisations chose to join the new agreement, which runs for three years, starting January 1st 2019. It covers rights to publish in over 1 800 hybrid journals at no extra cost for the author as well as reading rights from 1997 for over 2 100 journals. Together with the other agreement recently signed for publishing in gold open access journals, this new Read & Publish agreement allows researchers affiliated with the Bibsam Consortium to publish open access in almost the entire Springer Nature journal portfolio….”

Collaboration is the key to open access and open science | Times Higher Education (THE)

“Over the past 18 months, university library consortia in Germany, Sweden and California have cancelled their subscriptions to Elsevier journals. This is because we have not yet reached agreement on how to support their objectives, which include making researchers’ published articles immediately open access.

Elsevier deeply regrets this situation. We fully support open access. And we recognise the benefits and importance of open access to many research communities. By sharing our perspective, we hope to build support to move things forward globally….”

New Open Access Agreements with SpringerNature and Oxford University Press | Medarbetarwebben

“The Swedish library consortium, of which SLU is a participant, has entered two new agreements with the scientific publishers SpringerNature and Oxford University Press. Both agreements state that any fees associated with open access publishing (APCs) are paid for centrally by the institution of the corresponding author instead of the authors themselves….”

Studie om inter­na omför­del­nings­mo­del­ler av kost­na­der inom Bibsam­kon­sor­ti­et – Kungliga biblioteket – kb.se

In recent years, the Bibsam consortium has signed transformational agreements where Open Access publishing accounts for part of the cost. An independent consultant will now investigate and produce scenarios for models for how the costs can be distributed among the participating organisations….”

Open and Shut?: Why did Riksbankens Jubileumsfond decide to leave cOAlition S?

“Nevertheless, Plan S appears to still be struggling to sign up new funders. When it launched, there were 10 funders; today there are still only 19. Many believe this is too few to trigger the change to scholarly communication that cOAlition S members want. Importantly, the two largest producers of research papers in the world – China and the US – are notable by their absence from the coalition.

 

Perhaps unsurprisingly, while cOAlition S is quick to tell the world when it signs up a new funder, it is silent when a funder leaves the coalition. It has not, for instance, publicly commented on the decision by the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences (Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, or RJ) to leave the coalition. RJ’s name just disappeared from the Plan S web page sometime during the week beginning 20th May. How, when and why did RJ leave?…”

Open Access dystopia arrives at Karolinska – For Better Science

“I know of a case where an unemployed researcher saw his postdoctoral research paper blocked in limbo by Taylor & Francis after acceptance, with the demand that the author either pays the hefty APC of $2500 or formally withdraws the manuscript. All he was offered was a minor discount. Eventually, that ex-postdoc’s former employer conceded to his pleas and agreed to pay the APC. Only that it hasn’t happened yet and the accepted proofread paper is stuck for already over half a year in the Taylor & Francis black box, unpaid and unpublished. You can call it blackmail if you like. [this story has been corrected, I initially wrote the author was in luck and the university did pay.] …”