Research: Sci-Hub provides access to nearly all scholarly literature | eLife | Daniel Scott Himmelstein et al.

“Abstract: The website Sci-Hub enables users to download PDF versions of scholarly articles, including many articles that are paywalled at their journal’s site. Sci-Hub has grown rapidly since its creation in 2011, but the extent of its coverage was unclear. Here we report that, as of March 2017, Sci-Hub’s database contains 68.9% of the 81.6 million scholarly articles registered with Crossref and 85.1% of articles published in toll access journals. We find that coverage varies by discipline and publisher, and that Sci-Hub preferentially covers popular, paywalled content. For toll access articles, we find that Sci-Hub provides greater coverage than the University of Pennsylvania, a major research university in the United States. Green open access to toll access articles via licit services, on the other hand, remains quite limited. Our interactive browser at https://greenelab.github.io/scihub allows users to explore these findings in more detail. For the first time, nearly all scholarly literature is available gratis to anyone with an Internet connection, suggesting the toll access business model may become unsustainable.”

The State of OA: A large-scale analysis of the prevalence and impact of Open Access articles [PeerJ Preprints]

Despite growing interest in Open Access (OA) to scholarly literature, there is an unmet need for large-scale, up-to-date, and reproducible studies assessing the prevalence and characteristics of OA. We address this need using oaDOI, an open online service that determines OA status for 67 million articles.

 

How ContentMine at Cambridge will use CrossRef’s API to mine Science | ContentMine

“I’ve described how CrossRef works – now I’ll show how ContentMine will use it for daily mining. ContentMine sets out to mine the whole scientific literature “100 million facts”. Up till now we’ve been building the technical infrastructure, challenging for our rights, understanding the law, and ordering the kit. We’ve built and deployed a number of prototypes. But we are now ready to start indexing science in earnest. Since ContentMining has been vastly underused, and because publisher actions have often chilled researchers and libraries, we don’t know in detail what people want and how they would tackle it. We think there are many approaches – here are a few …”