Plant Communications: An Open Access Venue for Communicating Diverse Plant Science Discoveries – ScienceDirect

“With the coming of the new year 2020, we are pleased to invite you to join us in celebrating the birth of a new plant science journal, Plant Communications, by reading this editorial. Together with Cell Press, a well-known life science publisher, we are launching Plant Communications as an open access journal sister to Molecular Plant, one of the leading plant science journals, which has published cutting-edge research for 12 years along with continuously improved services to the global plant science community….”

PBJ ranks higher, enhances diversity and offers free global access – Daniell – 2021 – Plant Biotechnology Journal – Wiley Online Library

“Since I started as the Editor?in?Chief in 2012, submission of manuscripts has almost tripled, despite transition to an open access journal a few years ago. Despite COVID?19, the number of submissions to PBJ [Plant Biotechnology Journal] continued to increase in 2020….”

CorkOakDB—The Cork Oak Genome Database Portal | Database | Oxford Academic

Abstract:  Quercus suber (cork oak) is an evergreen tree native to the Mediterranean basin, which plays a key role in the ecology and economy of this area. Over the last decades, this species has gone through an observable decline, mostly due to environmental factors. Deciphering the mechanisms of cork oak’s response to the environment and getting a deep insight into its biology are crucial to counteract biotic and abiotic stresses compromising the stability of a unique ecosystem. In the light of these setbacks, the publication of the genome in 2018 was a major step towards understanding the genetic make-up of this species. In an effort to integrate this information in a comprehensive, accessible and intuitive format, we have developed The Cork Oak Genome Database Portal (CorkOakDB). The CorkOakDB is supported by the BioData.pt e-infrastructure, the Portuguese ELIXIR node for biological data. The portal gives public access to search and explore the curated genomic and transcriptomic data on this species. Moreover, CorkOakDB provides a user-friendly interface and functional tools to help the research community take advantage of the increased accessibility to genomic information. A study case is provided to highlight the functionalities of the portal. CorkOakDB guarantees the update, curation and data collection, aiming to collect data besides the genetic/genomic information, in order to become the main repository in cork oak research.

 

Iterative books: Posthumous publishing in eighteenth-century botany – Bettina Dietz, 2020

Abstract:  The growing number of known plants, and the need repeatedly to correct their names and their taxonomic attributions, demanded strategies for combining the static nature of a printed book with the fluctuating nature of the information it contained. From the second half of the seventeenth century botanists increasingly relied on publishing multiple updated editions of a book instead of attempting to correct, polish, and thus delay the appearance of a manuscript until, in the author’s opinion, it was finished. Provisional by nature, iterative books offered a solution. They were transient, open-ended and open to intervention, whether by one or multiple authors. Taking as an example the posthumous publication of orphaned material and manuscripts, a widespread phenomenon in eighteenth-century botany, this essay will focus on the sequence of iterative books that were published during the first half of the eighteenth century, based on the herbaria and papers left behind by the German botanist Paul Hermann (1646–95).

 

LCVP, The Leipzig catalogue of vascular plants, a new taxonomic reference list for all known vascular plants | Scientific Data

Abstract:  The lack of comprehensive and standardized taxonomic reference information is an impediment for robust plant research, e.g. in systematics, biogeography or macroecology. Here we provide an updated and much improved reference list of 1,315,562 scientific names for all described vascular plant species globally. The Leipzig Catalogue of Vascular Plants (LCVP; version 1.0.3) contains 351,180 accepted species names (plus 6,160 natural hybrids), within 13,460 genera, 564 families and 84 orders. The LCVP a) contains more information on the taxonomic status of global plant names than any other similar resource, and b) significantly improves the reliability of our knowledge by e.g. resolving the taxonomic status of ~181,000 names compared to The Plant List, the up to date most commonly used plant name resource. We used ~4,500 publications, existing relevant databases and available studies on molecular phylogenetics to construct a robust reference backbone. For easy access and integration into automated data processing pipelines, we provide an ‘R’-package (lcvplants) with the LCVP.

 

Editorial: About the possibility of Applied Vegetation Science going Gold Open Access – vegsciblog.org

“Some time ago, IAVS was put in front of quite an important decision. Two of our journals, the Journal of Vegetation Science and Applied Vegetation Science, are currently distributed under the hybrid open-access model, when readers pay, and authors publish for free (while allowing publishing also open access articles for an extra cost). However, Wiley, our publisher, asked us to transfer AVS into the Gold Open Access model (Gold OA) when readers read for free, but authors pay. Wiley argues that the transition into OA is a current trend in publishing and meets the demands of readers and funders. However, the unsaid truth also is that the publishing landscape is changing. Researchers started to use alternative (and often illegal) ways of getting paywalled papers, and the high cost of journal subscriptions lead many libraries and institutions to cancel it. This motivates publishers to transit more and more journals into the Gold OA model, which should secure their profit and in turn also the income of associations, dependent on money from journal publishing. The downside of the Gold OA model, which may not be so apparent to readers, but becomes painfully apparent to the authors, is the costly Article Processing Charge or Article Publication Charge (APC) needed to be paid upon acceptance of the paper for the publication (for AVS currently proposed at £1900 per article)….”

Editorial: About the possibility of Applied Vegetation Science going Gold Open Access – vegsciblog.org

“Some time ago, IAVS was put in front of quite an important decision. Two of our journals, the Journal of Vegetation Science and Applied Vegetation Science, are currently distributed under the hybrid open-access model, when readers pay, and authors publish for free (while allowing publishing also open access articles for an extra cost). However, Wiley, our publisher, asked us to transfer AVS into the Gold Open Access model (Gold OA) when readers read for free, but authors pay. Wiley argues that the transition into OA is a current trend in publishing and meets the demands of readers and funders. However, the unsaid truth also is that the publishing landscape is changing. Researchers started to use alternative (and often illegal) ways of getting paywalled papers, and the high cost of journal subscriptions lead many libraries and institutions to cancel it. This motivates publishers to transit more and more journals into the Gold OA model, which should secure their profit and in turn also the income of associations, dependent on money from journal publishing. The downside of the Gold OA model, which may not be so apparent to readers, but becomes painfully apparent to the authors, is the costly Article Processing Charge or Article Publication Charge (APC) needed to be paid upon acceptance of the paper for the publication (for AVS currently proposed at £1900 per article)….”

JVS/AVS Chief Editors’ opinion on Open Access – vegsciblog.org

“This Commentary is a part of the series asking the question: should Applied Vegetation Science, the journal owned by IAVS [International Association of Vegetation Science] and published by Wiley, become Gold Open Access? For the context and link to other Commentaries, please visit Editorial….

The mission of IAVS and its journals is to serve all the vegetation scientists globally. From this perspective, changing the journals to Open Access publication model presents a risk of exclusion of many colleagues who cannot afford to pay APCs. Therefore, we prefer to wait until the systems that would guarantee equal access to publication funds are implemented in most of the countries from which we regularly receive submissions. For the moment, we propose that both journals continue to be published under the current hybrid model, in which single articles can be published Open Access if the authors can and wish to pay….”

 

 

JVS/AVS Chief Editors’ opinion on Open Access – vegsciblog.org

“This Commentary is a part of the series asking the question: should Applied Vegetation Science, the journal owned by IAVS [International Association of Vegetation Science] and published by Wiley, become Gold Open Access? For the context and link to other Commentaries, please visit Editorial….

The mission of IAVS and its journals is to serve all the vegetation scientists globally. From this perspective, changing the journals to Open Access publication model presents a risk of exclusion of many colleagues who cannot afford to pay APCs. Therefore, we prefer to wait until the systems that would guarantee equal access to publication funds are implemented in most of the countries from which we regularly receive submissions. For the moment, we propose that both journals continue to be published under the current hybrid model, in which single articles can be published Open Access if the authors can and wish to pay….”

 

 

AoBP ECOS Awards – Buckley Lab at UC Davis

“Beginning in 2020, AoBP will award USD $3,000 annually to each of up to three early-career researchers who have dedicated considerable effort to advancing the goals and ideals of open science.

The AoBP ECOS Awards (Early Career Open Science) aim to promote and celebrate people who are changing science for the better. People who are willing to go against the grain of hype-driven science. Willing to resist cynical citation-chasing. Willing to share their data, code and ideas. Willing to stand up for those who have been historically excluded or mistreated in science. Willing to publish negative results. Willing to promote others who respect these things.

To be eligible for an AoBP ECOS Award, you must have been active in research involving plants and the environment within the last two years, and you must be no more than eight years post-PhD. Scientists of any rank or position are eligible (students, postdocs, technicians, faculty). Individuals can self-nominate or be nominated by others (with the nominee’s agreement)….”