Europe’s open-access drive escalates as university stand-offs spread

“Sweden is latest country to hold out on journal subscriptions, while negotiators share tactics to broker new deals with publishers.

Bold efforts to push academic publishing towards an open-access model are gaining steam. Negotiators from libraries and university consortia across Europe are sharing tactics on how to broker new kinds of contracts that could see more articles appear outside paywalls. And inspired by the results of a stand-off in Germany, they increasingly declare that if they don’t like what publishers offer, they will refuse to pay for journal access at all. On 16 May, a Swedish consortium became the latest to say that it wouldn’t renew its contract, with publishing giant Elsevier. Under the new contracts, termed ‘read and publish’ deals, libraries still pay subscriptions for access to paywalled articles, but their researchers can also publish under open-access terms so that anyone can read their work for free. Advocates say such agreements could accelerate the progress of the open-access movement. Despite decades of campaigning for research papers to be published openly — on the grounds that the fruits of publicly funded research should be available for all to read — scholarly publishing’s dominant business model remains to publish articles behind paywalls and collect subscriptions from libraries (see ‘Growth of open access’). But if many large library consortia strike read-and-publish deals, the proportion of open-access articles could surge….”

Is Europe about to create an OA label for universities as an incentive to fos…

“Norway has a suggestion for Europe:
http://www.uio.no/om/aktuelt/rektorbloggen/2018/position_paper_from_the_norwegian_universities_web.pdf

[W]e support the idea of a European university label for institutions that actively and successfully promote open science, open innovation and openness to the world. Institutions acquiring the label must document open science skills for project leaders, offer training programs in open science, implement the DORA-principles, support open innovation through digital solutions and promote open science throughout the entire research cycle. These principles should also be fully adapted and implemented in the evaluation processes. The involvement of citizens in projects and stimulating public engagement should be an embedded part of research projects.

The EC seems to like the idea:
https://sciencebusiness.net/framework-programmes/news/moedas-pins-hopes-renewed-innovation-agenda-going-budget-battle

The May 2 spending proposal from the European Commission made Moedas one of the biggest budget winners, with almost €100 billion earmarked for the next research programme, Horizon Europe….Getting countries into his corner, Moedas will know, is a prerequisite for realising his main policy goals, which have been years in preparation. Included in the list of initiatives presented to reporters were many recognisable ideas….The only genuinely new idea, and seemingly a suggestion from Norway, was to create an ‘open science label’ for universities to reward efforts to publish open access science. …”

eInfraCentral Platform

“e-Infrastructures address the needs of European researchers for digital services in terms of networking, computing and data management by fostering the emergence of Open Science. In the context of the European open science agenda there is a need to capitalise on past e-infrastructure investments and develop an e-infrastructure commons. To be able to achieve this there are a number of obstacles that need to address the issue of:

  • service accessibility, interoperability and fragmentationcomprehensibility and clarity + inconsistent use of key performance indicators (KPIs) for assessing added value.

The actions taken by the eInfraCentral project to address these obstacles are by:

  • Structure an open and guided discussion between e-infrastructures to consensually define a common catalogue for their services.
  • Develop a single entry point (one-stop shop) – the eInfraCentral portal – for end users to browse the service catalogue, and enhance the monitoring of key performance indicators (KPIs) that focus on availability and quality of services and user satisfaction.
  • Draw policy and sustainability lessons for the future development of a European e-infrastructure ‘market place’ as an extension of the common service catalogue and portal so that it includes a much broader range of e-infrastructures and services. …”

e-Infrastructures | Digital Single Market

“e-Infrastructures foster the emergence of Open Science, i.e. new working methods based on the shared use of ICT tools and resources across different disciplines and technology domains as well as sharing of results and an open way of working together. Furthermore, e-Infrastructures enable and support the circulation of knowledge in Europe online and therefore constitute an essential building block for the European Research Area (ERA).

The European Commission launched the “European Cloud Initiative – Building a competitive data and knowledge economy in Europe” to capitalise on the data revolution. Under this initiative, a European Data infrastructure will combine world-class supercomputing capability with high-speed connectivity and leading-edge data and sofware services for science, industry and the public sector. This will stimulate Open science and innovation by enabling researchers to access and re-use the huge amounts of scientific data.

The European Cloud initiative will fully unlock the value of big data and foster scientific and technological innovation while helping achieve the objectives of the Digital Single Market Strategy.

More information is available on the European Open Science Cloud webpage….”

Project THOR – Technical and Human infrastructure for Open Research

“THOR is a 30 month project funded by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 programme. It will establish seamless integration between articles, data, and researchers across the research lifecycle. This will create a wealth of open resources and foster a sustainable international e-infrastructure. The result will be reduced duplication, economies of scale, richer research services, and opportunities for innovation. Learn more about the THOR mission….”

FREYA — English

“FREYA is a 3-year project funded by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 programme. The project aims to build the infrastructure for persistent identifiers as a core component of open science, in the EU and globally. FREYA will improve discovery, navigation, retrieval, and access of research resources. New provenance services will enable researchers to better evaluate data and make the scientific record more complete, reliable, and traceable. By engaging with the global community through the Research Data Alliance and other research infrastructures, we work together to realise the vision of fully and effectively accessible data. FREYA follows on from the successful THOR project. Read more about what we do here….”