Open science: European universities have more homework to do on data handling | Science|Business

“According to the latest data from the European University Association (EUA), only 21 per cent of surveyed higher education institutions have policies on research data management in place. Another 38 per cent of universities were in the process of developing them. However, almost 40 per cent reported that they lacked or were not in the process of developing such policies.”

To gather insights into Open rewards and incentives, survey targets 200 European funders – SPARC Europe

“This week, SPARC Europe, in consultation with ALLEA, The European Foundation Centre (EFC) and Science Europe, sent surveys to almost 200 funding bodies throughout Europe. The initiative is intended to garner insights into the various patterns of rewards and incentives being employed by Europe’s research funders to encourage openness to the research they fund. …

Key international funding bodies, national funding agencies, major charities and foundations, national academies and key research performing organisation are targeted for the survey, which will remain open until the end of April. Results will be shared in the form of a report that will be released this summer; and the dataset arising from the survey will also be published under an open licence.  …”

cOALition S and Plan S: explained | European Heart Journal | Oxford Academic

cOAlition S signals the commitment to implement, by 1 January 2020, the necessary measures to fulfil its main principle: ‘By 2020 scientific publications that result from research funded by public grants provided by participating national and European research councils and funding bodies, must be published in compliant Open Access Journals or on compliant Open Access Platforms’.

cOAlition S currently comprises 13 national research funding organizations and two charitable foundations from 13 countries who have agreed to implement the 10 principles of Plan S in a coordinated way, together with the European Commission and the ERC….

An implementation task force, led by John-Arne Røttingen (RCN) and David Sweeney (UKRI), will now collaborate with other stakeholders and work towards the swift and practical implementation of these principles….”

Open Scholarship Policies and Technologies: The European Research Library as a Model for Advancing Global Scholarly Communication

“This project site is the compilation of all the materials, outputs, and tangents from my Fulbright-Schuman research fellowship. I am sharing them as a collated research object because each piece informed the others, due to the nature of this kind of fellowship being an all-encompassing life/professional experience.

It is my hope that in sharing these artifacts, the Fulbright will be demystified, especially for librarians and information scientists. Also, I hope the collection of these together will inspire more research about what role libraries will continue to play in the advancement of a more open global scholarly environment….”

APE organiser wants foundation to continue event | Research Information

“Arnoud de Kemp, founder of the APE [Academic Publishing in Europe] conference, has revealed his plans to create a foundation to continue the event way into the future.

De Kemp has been running the conference, which takes place in Berlin each January, for 15 years. In an interview with Research Information De Kemp, who turns 75 this year, revealed his ambitions. 

He told editor Tim Gillett: ‘It is still early days but I am investigating to create a permanent entity, such as a foundation, to continue the aims of the APE Conferences. 

‘The aim is that the net income from the conferences should be used for educational programs – for instance where young publishers and early career researchers can learn together how to respect each other, and together improve the world.’

In the interview he stated that APE has been instrumental in helping members of the academic publishing community to better share their ideas and ambitions….”

‘Up to half’ of European papers to be open access under Plan S | Times Higher Education (THE)

European countries signed up to Plan S can expect to have about half their total research output published in open access format, according to new analysis that offers a snapshot of the scheme’s potential global impact.

The Plan S Footprint: Implications for the Scholarly Publishing Landscape, published by research data analysts Clarivate, examines the extent to which existing publications comply with the guidelines for Plan S, under which participating funders will require all the research that they had supported to be made freely available at the point of publication from next January….

While the papers funded by Plan S backers account for only about 6.4 per cent of total annual academic output, researchers found their impact to be much wider, with compliant papers racking up more citations on average, across all fields.

In molecular biology and genetics, for example, 2017 papers authored by one or more researchers supported by Plan S signatories received an average of 7.7 citations, compared with the total subject average of 4.7….

The paper estimates that about 90,000 papers funded by Plan S supporters which are currently published in hybrid or subscription journals would need to be “rehoused” if the titles did not flip to full open access.

“The relocation of content to open access titles would represent a 29 per cent overall movement in the volume of well-cited papers in the existing compliant venues,” the researchers add, which “could be disruptive in some subjects, and suitable compliant venues are not always available”. …”

 

‘Up to half’ of European papers to be open access under Plan S | Times Higher Education (THE)

European countries signed up to Plan S can expect to have about half their total research output published in open access format, according to new analysis that offers a snapshot of the scheme’s potential global impact.

The Plan S Footprint: Implications for the Scholarly Publishing Landscape, published by research data analysts Clarivate, examines the extent to which existing publications comply with the guidelines for Plan S, under which participating funders will require all the research that they had supported to be made freely available at the point of publication from next January….

While the papers funded by Plan S backers account for only about 6.4 per cent of total annual academic output, researchers found their impact to be much wider, with compliant papers racking up more citations on average, across all fields.

In molecular biology and genetics, for example, 2017 papers authored by one or more researchers supported by Plan S signatories received an average of 7.7 citations, compared with the total subject average of 4.7….

The paper estimates that about 90,000 papers funded by Plan S supporters which are currently published in hybrid or subscription journals would need to be “rehoused” if the titles did not flip to full open access.

“The relocation of content to open access titles would represent a 29 per cent overall movement in the volume of well-cited papers in the existing compliant venues,” the researchers add, which “could be disruptive in some subjects, and suitable compliant venues are not always available”. …”

 

Coko Open Science – achieving FAIR data : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“The European Commission has identified the opportunity to save €10.2 billion per year by using FAIR data (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable). As policies begin to emerge requiring FAIR data, it’s timely to consider the open infrastructure needed to make embed FAIRness into the research and research communication workflows and outputs.  

Coko recently received a grant from the Sloan Foundation to build DataSeer, an web service that uses Natural Language Processing to identify and call out datasets associated with research articles. Datasets are often not explicitly identified, let alone made FAIR and accessible. The first step is knowing how many datasets were used in a body of work. DataSeer “reads” documents and finds mentions of dataset creation and use. Based on the context, DataSeer can offer recommendations to curate, deposit, add metadata too, or otherwise better handle datasets. DataSeer can fit into the workflows of researchers, publishers, aggregators, funders, and institutions….

Before FAIR compliance can be assessed, the full range of datasets associated with a research project must first be identified. There are often ‘hidden’ datasets mentioned in the text that are included among the ‘official’ outputs. DataSeer finds these mentions and help  to authors to identify and share all of the datasets involved in their work. …”

Search is on for new steward to deliver Plan S open access, as Smits bows out

“Robert-Jan Smits finished his one year mandate as the European Commission’s open access envoy last week and will be replaced for now by Robert [Kiley], head of open research at the Wellcome Trust, until a long-term coordinator for the Plan S open access initiative is appointed.

Smits, who is leaving the Commission to become president of the Eindhoven University of Technology, says there is a shortlist of two candidates to take over the position on a permanent basis….”

The “Plan S” blog: Is the EU’s open access plan a tremor or an earthquake? | Science|Business

On the surface, Plan S looks like the breaking of the scientific publishing mould. An initiative of Science Europe and Robert-Jan Smits, the European Commission’s former open access envoy, it stipulates that, by 2020, taxpayer-funded research results should be free to read immediately on publication.

It is a sharp departure – some would say threat – to the status quo. Depending on whom you talk to, the scheme, backed by a growing number of influential national funding agencies and research charities, represents the most promising effort to collapse paywalls in the world. But it is also opposed by some as a misguided attack on academic freedom (Read more here and here). And of course, it is also opposed by some scientific publishers.

In this rolling blog, we’ll be bringing you coverage and analysis of the multiple Plan S fissures more closely. The initiative’s organisers say they will publish feedback from their public consultation in the coming months, along with an updated version of the scheme’s ‘implementation plan’. Following, in no particular order, is a summary of some of the Plan S feedback already out there in the world….”