As Elsevier Falters, Wiley Succeeds in Open-Access Deal Making | The Scientist Magazine®

“Over the last few years, Project DEAL, a consortium that represents around 700 academic institutions in Germany, has been in negotiations for nationwide licensing agreements with three of the largest scholarly publishers—Elsevier, Springer Nature, and Wiley. Most of the news surrounding the effort has focused on disputes with Elsevier, which have led to lapses in subscriptions and lost access to the publisher’s journals. But the tune changed in January when DEAL announced its first triumph: a deal with Wiley.

Under the new agreement, which lasts for three years and commences in July, researchers at DEAL-represented institutions will be able to both publish open-access articles and read any papers in the publisher’s journals for a single fee. The final sum will depend on the total number of articles published by German researchers, which, according to the contract, is expected to amount to 9,500 papers per year and cost €26,125,000 (around $29.5 million USD) annually….”

Following UC’s break with Elsevier, messages of support from around the world pour in | UC Berkeley Library News

“On Thursday, the University of California announced its separation with Elsevier, one of the world’s largest — and most profitable — publishers of academic research.

After months of negotiations, the publisher had refused to meet UC’s core demands: universal open access to UC research and a subscription plan that would account for open access publishing fees. So UC walked away.

In the days since, messages of support and congratulations have come pouring in from around the world. Here is a sample of the responses, by turns fiery, joyous, and heartwarming….”

OSU Libraries and Elsevier, one of the world’s major providers of scientific, technical and medical information | Libraries | Oregon State University

“In early 2019, OSU Libraries began to prepare for its negotiations with the global publisher Elsevier for a possible 2020 contract renewal. The preparation has focused on discussing scenarios with contract partners at the University of Oregon and Portland State, examining Oregon State’s usage of Elsevier content, and gathering data about OSU faculty who are Elsevier editors and authors.

Just last week, the University of California System terminated its subscriptions with Elsevier after months of negotiations failed. The UC system is not the first large research institution or system to walk away from a big deal with a major STEM publisher, but this event has certainly caught the attention of higher education institutions across the United States and Canada. …

Looking ahead, OSU Libraries will begin working with the Faculty Senate Library Committee and the senior administration at OSU to share information about Elsevier usage and costs as well as desired contract terms. We recognize the need to reach out to the OSU research community to keep faculty and graduate students informed, so we expect to host conversations and forums in the coming months to discuss the issues and possible outcomes. Please look for invitations to stay informed and be engaged in OSU Today and on the Libraries’ website….”

UC ends contract with largest scientific publisher in a push for open-access research

The University of California will not renew its subscription to Elsevier, the world’s largest scientific publisher, citing inability to reach an agreement that would give public access to all UC research while keeping the costs associated with for-profit journals down.

According to a UC press release, the university aims to make the research produced by its 10 campuses — which account for nearly 10 percent of all U.S. publishing output — available to the world at no cost. UC said Elsevier’s proposed terms would charge UC authors large open-access publishing fees on top of its multimillion-dollar subscription….”

With No Open Access Deal, UC Breaks with Elsevier | The Scientist Magazine

“The University of California has ended its subscription to journals published by Elsevier, citing a failure to reach an agreement that would lower fees and prioritize open access to its scholars’ work, the UC system announced yesterday (February 28). The decision to stop paying for access to Elsevier’s journals came after eight months of contract negotiations. 

The university system’s previous contract with the publishing giant expired on December 31, and the research heavyweight, accounting for nearly 10 percent of research output in the US, aimed to secure a deal to pay a one-time fee that covered both journal subscriptions and the processing fees to make UC researchers’ articles open access for all readers. …”

With No Open Access Deal, UC Breaks with Elsevier | The Scientist Magazine

“The University of California has ended its subscription to journals published by Elsevier, citing a failure to reach an agreement that would lower fees and prioritize open access to its scholars’ work, the UC system announced yesterday (February 28). The decision to stop paying for access to Elsevier’s journals came after eight months of contract negotiations. 

The university system’s previous contract with the publishing giant expired on December 31, and the research heavyweight, accounting for nearly 10 percent of research output in the US, aimed to secure a deal to pay a one-time fee that covered both journal subscriptions and the processing fees to make UC researchers’ articles open access for all readers. …”

University of California drops subscriptions to Elsevier, world’s largest publisher of scientific papers – Vox – [https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2019/3/1/18245235/university-of-california-elsevier-subscription-open-access]

“The UC system just dropped its $10 million-a-year subscription to the world’s largest publisher of academic journals….

This might seem like an odd move for a university — denying its students access to journals and academic papers they need for homework and research. But it’s driven by principle: The University of California doesn’t want scientific knowledge locked up behind paywalls, and thinks the costs of academic publishing have grown out of control….”

University of California break with Elsevier tipped to boost ‘global revolt’ | Times Higher Education (THE) – [https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/university-california-break-elsevier-tipped-boost-global-revolt]

The University of California system’s decision to end its contract with Elsevier has been hailed as a “major boost for the open access movement”, with scholars predicting it will result in a “snowball effect” on movement away from the use of high-cost subscription journals.

The major US public university system announced on 28 February that it was “taking a firm stand” by not renewing its nearly $11 million-a-year (£8.3 million) scholarly journal subscription to the publishing giant, following attempts to negotiate a new deal….

Michael Eisen, adjunct professor of genetics and development at the University of California, Berkeley, said the move does not go far enough and called for the UC system to adopt an “ironclad mandate” stipulating that all content produced by UC faculty will be made “immediately freely available” and refusing to “pay a single penny for subscription access to content that should be freely available”.

“If they adopted this stance, and stuck to it, other universities would follow suit and publishers would have no choice but to rapidly transition to a fully open access system,” he said….”

Breaking: UC terminates subscriptions with Elsevier in push for open access to publicly funded research | UC Berkeley Library News – [https://news.lib.berkeley.edu/elsevier-outcome]

While we did make progress, particularly in the past few weeks, toward defining a model for open access publishing of UC research, Elsevier was ultimately unwilling to meet UC’s key goal: securing universal open access to UC research, as stated in UC’s faculty-driven principles on scholarly communication, while integrating open access publishing fees and subscription fees into a single cost-controlled contract….”

Wiley Contract – Projekt DEAL

“We are happy to publish here the full text of the “Publish&Read” agreement between Project DEAL and Wiley signed 15th January 2019.

The forward-looking “Publish&Read” model at the basis of the agreement delivers the benefits of open access to authors and advances the principles of open science by enabling institutions and researchers alike to make the most of the opportunities that open dissemination in our digital environment provides….”