The YODA Project

“The Yale University Open Data Access (YODA) Project’s mission is to advocate for the responsible sharing of clinical research data, open science, and research transparency. The Project is committed to supporting research focused on improving the health of patients and informing science and public health. The YODA Project can only improve with your feedback. Please share your comments and ideas….

Remarkable quantities of data are generated through clinical research, much of which is never published nor disseminated, limiting its integration into current knowledge about treatment efficacy and safety. Some of these data could be used to replicate or extend previous research findings; others could be combined with additional data to enable researchers to analyze the results from a larger number of patients. All of it can be used to address secondary research questions to generate new knowledge. The challenge facing the clinical research enterprise has been to develop a sustainable method for qualified researchers and clinicians to access these data and utilize them to advance science. Sharing clinical data that are already in existence is an efficient use of collective scientific resources and maximizes the valuable contributions of those who volunteer to participate in research.

The Yale University Open Data Access (YODA) Project at the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation advocates for the responsible sharing of clinical research data. The Project is committed to open science and data transparency, and supports research attempting to produce concrete benefits to patients, the medical community, and society as a whole. Through experience and input from the public and stakeholders, the YODA Project has iteratively developed a model to make data available to researchers in a sustainable way, in which data sharing becomes a part of the clinical research enterprise of the future. The mission of the YODA Project is to not only increase access to clinical research data, but to promote its use to generate new knowledge….”

Yale University Press makes online resources available to students for free | YaleNews

“As college students nationwide transition to online classes, Yale University Press (YUP) is providing them free access to its ebooks, including digital textbooks, through the end of the semester.

YUP has arranged with digital content providers EBSCO, ProQuest, UPSO (Oxford), and De Gruyter to make a wide selection of ebooks — typically available for purchase — accessible to students at no cost through their institutions’ libraries. It also has agreements with popular online textbook rental stores VitalSource and Chegg to provide students electronic versions of textbooks that they had purchased but cannot access due to the unfolding pandemic….”

Data sharing from clinical trials: lessons from the YODA Project – STAT

“This week, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine are convening the workshop “Sharing Clinical Trial Data: Challenges and a Way Forward” just shy of five years after the Institute of Medicine released its seminal report, “Sharing Clinical Trial Data: Maximizing Benefits, Minimizing Risk.”

During this time, the scientific culture regarding data sharing has shifted. Just last week, the National Institutes of Health requested public comments on its draft “Policy for Data Management and Sharing.” In 2018, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors began requiring data-sharing plans for clinical trials as a condition for publication in member journals. And platforms such as ClinicalStudyDataRequest.com, Project Data Sphere, and BioLINCC have emerged or grown. These platforms use a variety of different governance structures and models for data access, developed both with and without the support of industry or government….

The Yale Open Data Access (YODA) Project, which two of us (J.S.R. and H.M.K.) co-direct, launched in 2011 and formed a partnership with Johnson & Johnson in 2014. This five-year partnership offers an opportunity to reflect on some of the questions about sharing clinical trial data that may inform ongoing and future efforts….”

medRxiv.org – the preprint server for Health Sciences

“medRxiv (pronounced “med-archive”) is a free online archive and distribution server for complete but unpublished manuscripts (preprints) in the medical, clinical, and related health sciences. Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been peer-reviewed. They should not be relied on to guide clinical practice or health-related behavior and should not be reported in news media as established information.

medRxiv was founded by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), a not-for-profit research and educational institution, Yale University, and BMJ, a global healthcare knowledge provider. The server is owned and operated by CSHL. medRxiv provides a platform for researchers to share, comment, and receive feedback on their work prior to journal publication. medRxiv aims to improve the openness and accessibility of scientific findings, enhance collaboration among researchers, document provenance of ideas, and inform ongoing and planned research through more timely reporting of completed research. medRxiv is a non-profit community resource and is not linked to any one publisher or journal….”

medRxiv.org – the preprint server for Health Sciences

“medRxiv (pronounced “med-archive”) is a free online archive and distribution server for complete but unpublished manuscripts (preprints) in the medical, clinical, and related health sciences. Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been peer-reviewed. They should not be relied on to guide clinical practice or health-related behavior and should not be reported in news media as established information.

medRxiv was founded by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), a not-for-profit research and educational institution, Yale University, and BMJ, a global healthcare knowledge provider. The server is owned and operated by CSHL. medRxiv provides a platform for researchers to share, comment, and receive feedback on their work prior to journal publication. medRxiv aims to improve the openness and accessibility of scientific findings, enhance collaboration among researchers, document provenance of ideas, and inform ongoing and planned research through more timely reporting of completed research. medRxiv is a non-profit community resource and is not linked to any one publisher or journal….”

New preprint server for medical research | The BMJ

This debate is not new for The BMJ: over 20 years ago Tony Delamothe, the journal’s deputy editor, asked The BMJ’sreadership what we should do about electronic preprints,8 and the responses9 were similar to discussions now. The headline conclusion reached by Delamothe was that clear labelling of preprints might allow them to be used safely.8 As a result, BMJ launched the first clinical preprint server, ClinMedNetPrints.org, in 1999. The server operated until 2008 and received around 80 submissions before it was closed because of lack of use.

But times have changed, and we believe the need for an independent clinical preprint server remains. Clinical research can currently be found scattered on various preprint servers, ranging from bioRxiv and arXiv to servers established by publishers to link to their journals.10 We believe that the community will be served best by a preprint server that is specific to clinical research so that suitable safeguards can operate and by one that is not linked to specific journals or publishers but provides a central freely accessible archive.

BMJ (publisher of The BMJ) is therefore announcing its partnership with colleagues at Yale University and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory to launch medRxiv. Harlan Krumholz and Joseph Ross, clinician-researchers at Yale, have long been advocates of preprints,4 while Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory operates the bioRxiv life sciences preprint server. BMJ brings its long experience of publishing and review of clinical research, researching the effects of changes in publishing,11 and publication ethics.12

In working to launch medRxiv we have focused on light-touch processes and workflows that we believe will reduce the potential for harm while retaining the advantages of speed and openness. A first step will be for authors to make various declarations about the work: how it has been conducted and reported, any conflicts of interest, and details of ethical approval. Then, all manuscripts will undergo several rapid rounds of screening before they are posted. The first will ensure that a manuscript is a research article (medRxiv will not accept case reports or opinion pieces, for example) and will cover obvious legal problems such as plagiarism and defamation. Then, a researcher in a relevant field will check the basic content and organisation of the article—but medRxiv does not endorse a manuscript’s methods, assumptions, conclusions, or scientific quality. And finally, a key screening question will be whether a preprint, if posted, has the potential to do harm to individual patients or the public. If in doubt medRxiv will not post the preprint; the authors will be encouraged instead to publish only after peer review.

By posting preprints, authors can help promote openness and transparency and reduce research waste from duplicated efforts and non-reporting. By helping ensure a balance of safety and speed, we believe medRxiv can provide a valuable service to the clinical research community. We will regularly report on any research that we do on the effect of preprints, and we encourage third parties to contact us for research opportunities. We also urge all readers of The BMJ and its sibling journals to read and deposit preprints in medRxiv. We look forward to reporting on its progress over the coming months….”

Yale Center for British Art Releases Thousands of Public Domain Images

“We are pleased to share news from the Yale Center for British Art about the recent release of more than 22,000 additional high-resolution digital images of works in the public domain to our online collection….Under Yale University’s Open Access Policy, anyone may use the Center’s digital images of public domain material without any application, authorization, or fees due to the Center or to Yale.

This image release was made in conjunction with the celebration of Public Domain Day on January 1, 2016.  Although most of the artworks in this release are not new entries to the public domain, in most cases this is the first time that digital images of these works are easily and openly accessible to the world….

The Center recognizes that lowering the barriers between its digitized resources and their users is critical for the advancement of knowledge. In doing so, the Center continues to promote the general principle of Yale University’s policy on access to digital image of works in the public domain, that the “preservation, transmission, and advancement of knowledge in the digital age are promoted by the unencumbered use and reuse of digitized content for research, teaching, learning, and creative activities.” …”