openaire-nexus-project

“OpenAIRE-Nexus brings in Europe, EOSC and the world a set of services to implement and accelerate Open Science. To embed in researchers workflows, making it easier for them to accept and uptake Open Science practices of openness and FAIRness. To give the tools to libraries, research communities to make their content more visible and discoverable. To assist policy makers to better understand the environment and ramifications of Open Science into new incentives, scientific reward criteria, impact indicators, so as to increase research and innovation potential. To foster innovation, by providing SMEs with open data about scientific production. To this aim, OpenAIRE-Nexus onboards to the EOSC fourteen services, provided by public institutions, einfrastructures, and companies, structured in three portfolios: PUBLISH, MONITOR and DISCOVER. The services are widely used in Europe and beyond and integrated in OpenAIRE-Nexus to assemble a uniform Open Science Scholarly Communication package for the EOSC. The project aims at forming synergies with other INFRAEOSC-07 awarded projects, the INFRAEOSC-03 project, research infrastructures, einfrastructures, and scholarly communication services define a common Open Science interoperability framework for the EOSC, to facilitate sharing, monitoring, and discovery of EOSC resources across disciplines….”

openaire-nexus-project

“OpenAIRE-Nexus brings in Europe, EOSC and the world a set of services to implement and accelerate Open Science. To embed in researchers workflows, making it easier for them to accept and uptake Open Science practices of openness and FAIRness. To give the tools to libraries, research communities to make their content more visible and discoverable. To assist policy makers to better understand the environment and ramifications of Open Science into new incentives, scientific reward criteria, impact indicators, so as to increase research and innovation potential. To foster innovation, by providing SMEs with open data about scientific production. To this aim, OpenAIRE-Nexus onboards to the EOSC fourteen services, provided by public institutions, einfrastructures, and companies, structured in three portfolios: PUBLISH, MONITOR and DISCOVER. The services are widely used in Europe and beyond and integrated in OpenAIRE-Nexus to assemble a uniform Open Science Scholarly Communication package for the EOSC. The project aims at forming synergies with other INFRAEOSC-07 awarded projects, the INFRAEOSC-03 project, research infrastructures, einfrastructures, and scholarly communication services define a common Open Science interoperability framework for the EOSC, to facilitate sharing, monitoring, and discovery of EOSC resources across disciplines….”

About The Lens » The Lens awarded $2M USD to strengthen institutional innovation capabilities

Cambia today announced a $2M USD grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to support scaling its prominent open knowledge platform, The Lens, as it launches its institutional toolkits to encourage shared evidence and open data to guide partnering and action for science-based problem solving by institutions….”

LYRASIS and Michigan Publishing Advance Community-owned, Publishing Ecosystem for eBook Distribution and Reading with Open-source System Integration

“LYRASIS and Michigan Publishing announce the successful integration of the Fulcrum platform with Library Simplified/SimplyE and The Readium Foundation’s Thorium Desktop Reader. 

This initiative brings together three open source reading and content delivery platforms, utilizing entirely open standards and technologies. By working together, the partners are improving discovery and access for ebooks and supporting the sustainability and scalability of two community-led social enterprises. …”

OSF Preprints | A survey of researchers’ needs and priorities for data sharing

Abstract:  PLOS has long supported Open Science. One of the ways in which we do so is via our stringent data availability policy established in 2014. Despite this policy, and more data sharing policies being introduced by other organizations, best practices for data sharing are adopted by a minority of researchers in their publications. Problems with effective research data sharing persist and these problems have been quantified by previous research as a lack of time, resources, incentives, and/or skills to share data.

  In this study we built on this research by investigating the importance of tasks associated with data sharing, and researchers’ satisfaction with their ability to complete these tasks. By investigating these factors we aimed to better understand opportunities for new or improved solutions for sharing data. In May-June 2020 we surveyed researchers from Europe and North America to rate tasks associated with data sharing on (i) their importance and (ii) their satisfaction with their ability to complete them. We received 728 completed and 667 partial responses. We calculated mean importance and satisfaction scores to highlight potential opportunities for new solutions to and compare different cohorts. Tasks relating to research impact, funder compliance, and credit had the highest importance scores. 52% of respondents reuse research data but the average satisfaction score for obtaining data for reuse was relatively low. Tasks associated with sharing data were rated somewhat important and respondents were reasonably well satisfied in their ability to accomplish them. Notably, this included tasks associated with best data sharing practice, such as use of data repositories. However, the most common method for sharing data was in fact via supplemental files with articles, which is not considered to be best practice. We presume that researchers are unlikely to seek new solutions to a problem or task that they are satisfied in their ability to accomplish, even if many do not attempt this task. This implies there are few opportunities for new solutions or tools to meet these researcher needs. Publishers can likely meet these needs for data sharing by working to seamlessly integrate existing solutions that reduce the effort or behaviour change involved in some tasks, and focusing on advocacy and education around the benefits of sharing data. There may however be opportunities – unmet researcher needs – in relation to better supporting data reuse, which could be met in part by strengthening data sharing policies of journals and publishers, and improving the discoverability of data associated with published articles.

Reframing research access | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  Purpose

The paper describes how Charles Darwin University (CDU) used a three-pronged approach to better serve its researchers: it developed a single interface for improved accessibility and discoverability of its research outputs, consolidated its corresponding policies and procedures and implemented training programs to support the new portal. This in turn made its suite of research outputs more openly accessible and better discoverable. The intention was to make CDU research compliant with the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) policy statement, affirming the need to make Australia’s research more visible, thereby enabling better access, better collaboration locally and internationally and researchers more accountable to their community.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses case study methodology and a qualitative approach.

Findings

CDU Library collaborated with the University’s Research Office in undertaking a series of strategies towards reframing access to its research. The partners migrated their research collections into a single, new, integrated interface; developed new policies and consolidated existing ones; and to this end, rolled out a training and educational program for the research community. The intention of the program was to introduce the Pure repository to new researchers and to train all staff to self archive and curate their own research outputs. This new streamlined approach ensured a more comprehensive and timely availability and accessibility of the University’s research outputs.

Originality/value

A single source of truth was established through the migration of iCDU’s research collections, ensuring data quality was maintained. At the start of this project, there were few institutions in Australia using the Pure system, and even fewer using it as their sole repository for displaying research outputs.

Discoverability in (a) Crisis – ScienceOpen

Abstract:  The coronavirus pandemic has exposed a host of issues with the current scholarly communication system, one aspect being the discoverability of scientific knowledge. Observing the many shortcomings of discovery workflows in the course of COVID-19 confirms that discoverability itself is in crisis. In this article, we analyze the discoverability crisis and its root causes. We introduce open discovery infrastructure as a promising approach for the development of innovative discovery solutions. We present several efforts based on open discovery infrastructure that have emerged to provide better discovery of coronavirus research and discuss what is still needed to overcome the discoverability crisis.

 

My Research Institute (and Scholarly Orphans project)

“The Scholarly Orphans project explores an institution driven approach to discover, capture, and archive scholarly artifacts that researchers deposit in productivity web portals as a means to collaborate and communicate with their peers. The project is funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and is a collaboration between the Prototyping Team of the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Web Science and Digital Library Research Group at Old Dominion University.

myresearch.institute and scholarlyorphans.org are components in a limited-term experiment conducted as part of the Scholarly Orphans project. The experiment is set up as an automated pipeline that is coordinated by an institutional orchestrator process, as depicted below. It was started on August 1 2018 and will be terminated on March 31 2020.

The modules in the pipeline are as follows:

 

Discovery of new artifacts deposited by a researcher in a portal is achieved by a Tracker that recurrently polls the portal’s API using the identity of the researcher in each portal as an access key. If a new artifact is discovered, its URI is passed on to the capture process.
Capturing an artifact is achieved by using web archiving techniques that pay special attention to generating representative high fidelity captures. A major project finding in this realm is the use of Traces that abstractly describe how a web crawler should capture a certain class of web resources. A Trace is recorded by a curator through interaction with a web resource that is an instance of that class. The result of capturing a new artifact is a WARC file in an institutional archive. The file encompasses all web resources that are an essential part of the artifact, according to the curator who recorded the Trace that was used to guide the capture process.
Archiving is achieved by ingesting WARC files from various institutions into a cross-institutional web archive that supports the Memento “Time Travel for the Web” protocol. As such, the Mementos in this web archive integrate seamlessly with those in other web archives….”