Arcadia Fund | Our response to the OSTP’s Request for Information on Open Access – Arcadia Fund

“A significant part of Arcadia’s mission is to protect endangered nature. In order to best protect threatened landscapes and biodiversity, it is vital that the latest research is easily and freely available to everyone engaged in conservation and restoration sciences. Yet recent analysis of a large survey conducted by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) indicates that half of the 2,285 respondents find it ‘not easy’ or ‘not at all easy’ to access relevant scientific research [1]. This is no surprise, as 85% of all conservation biology papers are not open for public readership [2]. These include many studies funded by US federal agencies. The situation is similar across most disciplines. For instance, in ophthalmology: across medical institutions there is widespread inequality of access to field-relevant research [3]. As these examples show, the traditional subscription journals business model does not provide equitable access to research paid for by public or philanthropic funds. It fails to provide sufficient easy access to discipline-relevant literature even to practitioners of the discipline, be it conservation sciences, ophthalmology or other scientific endeavours.

With easier and cheaper access, both researchers and practitioners would be more effective and productive.

Federal agencies have the power to mandate that federally-funded research should be immediately publicly available online, without a paywall, on publication. The United States has digital research infrastructures that could and would support such a policy. Government scientific research funders in Austria, Finland, France, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Slovenia, Sweden, Jordan, the United Kingdom, and Zambia have all committed to mandating the immediate public availability of government-funded research online, without a paywall. The world is now facing a pandemic that scientific research can help to solve. The United States would show leadership by making immediate public access to government-funded research the new normal. This would maximize the return on investment of US funded research – paywalled research outputs are a misuse and misappropriation of tax dollars.

We also note that academic paywalls harm national security: military consultancies and defense contractors have inadequate access to the latest research, which can deter them from turning concepts into reality [4]. The Department of Defense publishes unclassified research whilst protecting classified material. Open Access as practiced by Federal agencies is not a threat to national, military, or commercial interests….”

Arcadia Grant Supports the Publication of Open Access Monographs at the MIT Press

“I’m excited to announce that the MIT Press has published its first open access (OA) monographs on the MIT Press Direct platform. Supported by a generous grant from the Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, the project is part of a larger initiative to explore alternatives to the traditional market-based business model for professional and scholarly works on specialized subjects.

 

In 2019, the MIT Press received a three-year $850,000 grant from the Arcadia Fund to perform a broad-based monograph publishing cost analysis and to develop and openly disseminate a durable financial framework and business plan for OA monographs. As part of the project, the Press will also undertake a pilot program to implement the resulting framework for scholarly front and backlist titles….”

Next Generation Library Publishing Infrastructure ProjectRequest For Ideas Survey

“The Next Generation Library Publishing project (NGLP) has a grant from Arcadia to invest in existing, emerging, and new infrastructure for library publishing, and we need your help in deciding how and where to invest those funds. This is your chance to help shape the future of library and other nonprofit publishing by identifying specific ways we might focus our project resources toward improvements large and small. 

Based on your experiences with existing publishing technologies and workflows, we request your input on how to improve the scholarly communication publishing infrastructure. Infrastructure projects might include new tools, improvements to existing tools, bridges between tools, hosted solutions, or even work on shared practice and standards. We are also interested in projects or initiatives that relate to this effort.
  
We are eager to see all your ideas, from single sentence wishes to brief proposals for already well-formulated plans. It may be something that you or your organization wants to work on or something that you wish others would do to make your life easier. No idea is too big or too small! …”

Next Generation Library Publishing | Educopia Institute

“In this project, Educopia, California Digital Library (CDL), and Strategies for Open Science (Stratos), in close partnership with LYRASIS, Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR), and Longleaf Services are working to advance and integrate open source publishing infrastructure to provide robust support for library publishing. Our project goals include:

Creating a more balanced, effective academic publishing ecosystem that aligns with academic values and increases choice, opportunity, and innovation via compelling library publishing solutions;
Developing tools and standards that allow better integration of campus repository systems and publishing workflows across the lifecycle of scholarly research;
Establishing sustainable, community-governed, open solutions that rival best-of-breed commercial tools and advance scholarly communication in important ways….”

Illuminating the Flows – and Redactions – of Content Online | Berkman Klein Center

“The staff of Lumen, a unique public resource at Harvard University collecting and studying millions of removal requests for online content, is thrilled to announce that the project has received a $1.5 million grant from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, to expand and improve its database and research efforts.

From well-publicized takedowns from foreign governments, political campaigns and celebrities to more obscure requests from private entities and individuals, modern online platforms and search engines must regularly respond to requests and demands to remove content and links. Lumen provides a way for the public and its representatives – including academic researchers, journalists, and other stakeholders – to understand trends in demands for content removal and their outcomes in ways that balance public disclosure and privacy rights and serve the greater public interest….”

Coventry University Awarded Grant from Arcadia to support OA Monograph Infrastructures | Coventry University

“Coventry University has been awarded £800,000 from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, to support The Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM) project….”

Hyku Open Source Institutional Repository Development partnership awarded $1M Arcadia grant to improve open scholarship infrastructure | UVA Library News and Announcements

“The University of Virginia is pleased to announce a two-year award in the amount of $1,000,000 from Arcadia—a charitable fund of philanthropists Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin—in support of the “Advancing Hyku: Open Source Institutional Repository Platform Development” project.

Through this project, the University of Virginia and its partner institutions—Ubiquity Press and the British Library—will support the growth of open access through institutional repositories. Working with the global open infrastructure community, the partners will introduce significant structural improvements and new features to the Samvera Community’s Hyku Institutional Repository platform….”

Educopia partners with Curtin University-led alliance to increase the impact of university-based research | Educopia Institute

“A new alliance of researchers led by Curtin University in partnership with Educopia Institute will work together to improve the way research is shared, charting new pathways for the future of universities around the world.

Fresh strategies to reform the role of universities and build them into information-sharing Open Knowledge Institutions will be developed through the coalition of like-minded universities, in a $540,000 project led by Professor Cameron Neylon and Associate Professor Lucy Montgomery, both from Curtin’s Centre for Culture and Technology within the School of Media, Creative Arts and Social Inquiry. The project has been funded by UK-based Arcadia – a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, recognizing the success of the Curtin research team in leading research and practice on Open Knowledge universities….

Educopia’s Executive Director Katherine Skinner said the new alliance would provide insights into best practice and a more powerful voice for change….”

 

Arcadia funds new Curtin-led alliance to help universities share research – News and Events | Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia

“Fresh strategies to reform the role of universities and build them into information-sharing Open Knowledge Institutions will be developed through the coalition of like-minded universities, in a $540,000 project led by Professor Cameron Neylon and Associate Professor Lucy Montgomery, both from Curtin’s Centre for Culture and Technology within the School of Media, Creative Arts and Social Inquiry.

The project has been funded by UK-based Arcadia – a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, recognising the success of the Curtin research team in leading research and practice on Open Knowledge universities….”

MIT Press to develop a sustainable framework for open access monographs

The MIT Press has received a three-year $850,000 grant from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, to perform a broad-based monograph publishing cost analysis and to develop and openly disseminate a durable financial framework and business plan for open-access (OA) monographs. The press, a leader in OA publishing for almost 25 years, will also undertake a pilot program to implement the resulting framework for scholarly front- and backlist titles.