Plain Language Summary of Publication articles: helping disseminate published scientific articles to patients | Future Oncology

“Future Science Group (FSG) is keen to recognize and promote the vital role of patients in medical and scientific research, and as such, has introduced a new article type to its collection – the Plain Language Summary of Publication (PLSP). The present issue of Future Oncology features, as the first in this series, a standalone, peer-reviewed, open access PLSP article [6], which provides a visually enriched summary of a recently published research article [7]. PLSP articles are written to be read and understood by patients, patient advocates, their family members, friends and caregivers. The article will also enable other non-specialist clinicians, research scientists, decision-makers and a range of professionals in the health care community to gain an understanding of the research presented.

PLSP articles are written under the assumption that the audience has no background understanding of the study, medical terminology or clinical research in general. Each PLSP, however, will have a different style depending on the subject matter and a ‘personalized’ approach to writing each PLSP will be necessary in order to meet the educational requirements of the intended audience. For example, in the case of rare diseases, where patient readers are often well informed about the subject, a more ‘technically written’ PLSP may be considered. We recommend that all authors planning to write a PLSP first review the PLSP toolkit developed by Envision Pharma with support from PFMD, along with our own author guidelines [8]….”

Ten simple rules for innovative dissemination of research

“How we communicate research is changing because of new (especially digital) possibilities. This article sets out 10 easy steps researchers can take to disseminate their work in novel and engaging ways, and hence increase the impact of their research on science and society….”

 

Ten simple rules for innovative dissemination of research

“How we communicate research is changing because of new (especially digital) possibilities. This article sets out 10 easy steps researchers can take to disseminate their work in novel and engaging ways, and hence increase the impact of their research on science and society….”

 

New business models for the open research agenda | Research Information

“The rise of preprints and the move towards universal open access are potential threats to traditional business models in scholarly publishing, writes Phil Gooch

Publishers have started responding to the latter with transformative agreements[1], but if authors can simply upload their research to a preprint server for immediate dissemination, comment and review, why submit to a traditional journal at all? Some journals are addressing this by offering authors frictionless submission direct from the preprint server. This tackles two problems at once: easing authors’ frustrations with existing journal submission systems[2], and providing a more direct route from the raw preprint to the richly linked, multiformat version of record that readers demand and accessibility standards require….

Dissemination of early-stage research as mobile-unfriendly PDF is arguably a technological step backwards. If preprints are here to stay, the reading experience needs to be improved. A number of vendors have developed native XML or LaTeX authoring environments which enable dissemination in richer formats….”

Free dataset archive helps researchers quickly find a needle in a haystack

“Ahmed Eldawy, an assistant professor of computer science in the Marlan and Rosemary Bourns College of Engineering, and his group spent the last three years combing the internet for public spatio-temporal datasets, studying their attributes, and summarizing the results for each set on interactive maps that show the user exactly what they’re getting.

“People who work on data science need datasets but can spend a lot of time finding them,” Eldawy said. “I wanted to build an archive they can find easily.”

Called the UCR Spatio-temporal Active Repository, or UCR STAR, the archive is made available as a service to the research community to provide easy access to large spatio-temporal datasets through an interactive exploratory interface. Users can search and filter those datasets as if shopping for their research, except that everything is free….”

Scholarcy | Research Paper Summarizer – Chrome Web Store

“Summarizes research papers, creates interactive flashcards, highlights key points, links to open-access versions of each citation.

Scholarcy™ is the solution to that pile of papers on your virtual desk – research made easy!

This Extension gives you the key points of any research paper, report, or book chapter. It creates a referenced, paraphrased summary, and generates a background reading list for those new to a field.

Our unique Robo-Highlighter™ automatically highlights important contributions made by the paper. No more highlighting with a marker pen – our advanced AI does it for you.

Scholarcy also extracts figures, tables, and bibliographies, and locates open-access PDFs for each reference from Google Scholar, arXiv and elsewhere….”

Open access: remember the limitations of abstracts and the role of professional endorsement | The BMJ

In my discipline (e-health literacy), I often find myself debating whether abstracts being freely available to patients is of any real benefit. For researchers and clinicians, abstracts are a great timesaver—enabling a “flick-through” of the copious amounts of new articles for timely follow up. They may also be used by treating physicians and healthcare teams as a starting point for treatment planning and research. But abstracts are not designed to be an independent pathway to inform health decisions for patients lacking the appropriate professional expertise and health literacy skills….”

[Is this an argument against OA for abstracts, or for OA to full-text articles?]