The Sci-hub Effect: Sci-hub downloads lead to more article citations

Abstract:  Citations are often used as a metric of the impact of scientific publications. Here, we examine how the number of downloads from Sci-hub as well as various characteristics of publications and their authors predicts future citations. Using data from 12 leading journals in economics, consumer research, neuroscience, and multidisciplinary research, we found that articles downloaded from Sci-hub were cited 1.72 times more than papers not downloaded from Sci-hub and that the number of downloads from Sci-hub was a robust predictor of future citations. Among other characteristics of publications, the number of figures in a manuscript consistently predicts its future citations. The results suggest that limited access to publications may limit some scientific research from achieving its full impact.

 

SURVEY OF ACADEMIC LIBRARY USE OF COST PER DOWNLOAD DATA

“Welcome to Primary Research Group’s survey of how academic librarians identify and monitor the cost per download for journal articles used by their library patrons, and how librarians then use this data. The survey should take less than 10 minutes and all participants receive a free PDF copy of the survey results….”

Repository Analytics & Metrics Portal (RAMP)

“Montana State University, the Association of Research Libraries, the University of New Mexico, and OCLC Research have joined as partners to examine the difficulties that libraries face in producing accurate reports on the use of their digital repositories.

The Repository Analytics & Metrics Portal (RAMP) is a web service that improves the accuracy of institutional repository (IR) analytics and provides IR managers with the following capabilities:

Persistent access to accurate counts of file downloads from IR.
Implementation with minimal training or configuration.
The potential to aggregate IR metrics across organizations for consistent benchmarking and analysis….”

Repository Analytics & Metrics Portal (RAMP)

“Montana State University, the Association of Research Libraries, the University of New Mexico, and OCLC Research have joined as partners to examine the difficulties that libraries face in producing accurate reports on the use of their digital repositories.

The Repository Analytics & Metrics Portal (RAMP) is a web service that improves the accuracy of institutional repository (IR) analytics and provides IR managers with the following capabilities:

Persistent access to accurate counts of file downloads from IR.
Implementation with minimal training or configuration.
The potential to aggregate IR metrics across organizations for consistent benchmarking and analysis….”

Lockdown report sees record number of downloads through university repositories. But what does that tell us? | Jisc

“The report that convinced prime minister Boris Johnson to lock down our country was the most downloaded academic COVID-19 study in March 2020 among universities and research centres contributing to Institutional Repository Usage Statistics (IRUS).

UK institutions which are responsible for the top ten most downloaded COVID-19 content in March include Imperial College London, London School of Economics, University College London and the Institute of Development Studies. 

But what do the top ten COVID-19 studies tell us about the use of open access materials and the role that institutional repositories (IRs) play in this context? …”

A systematic examination of preprint platforms for use in the medical and biomedical sciences setting | bioRxiv

Abstract:  Objectives: The objective of this review is to identify all preprint platforms with biomedical and medical scope and to compare and contrast the key characteristics and policies of these platforms. We also aim to provide a searchable database to enable relevant stakeholders to compare between platforms. Study Design and Setting: Preprint platforms that were launched up to 25th June 2019 and have a biomedical and medical scope according to MEDLINE’s journal selection criteria were identified using existing lists, web-based searches and the expertise of both academic and non-academic publication scientists. A data extraction form was developed, pilot-tested and used to collect data from each preprint platform’s webpage(s). Data collected were in relation to scope and ownership; content-specific characteristics and information relating to submission, journal transfer options, and external discoverability; screening, moderation, and permanence of content; usage metrics and metadata. Where possible, all online data were verified by the platform owner or representative by correspondence. Results: A total of 44 preprint platforms were identified as having biomedical and medical scope, 17 (39%) were hosted by the Open Science Framework preprint infrastructure, six (14%) were provided by F1000 Research Ltd (the Open Research Central infrastructure) and 21 (48%) were other independent preprint platforms. Preprint platforms were either owned by non-profit academic groups, scientific societies or funding organisations (n=28; 64%), owned/partly owned by for-profit publishers or companies (n=14; 32%) or owned by individuals/small communities (n=2; 5%). Twenty-four (55%) preprint platforms accepted content from all scientific fields although some of these had restrictions relating to funding source, geographical region or an affiliated journal’s remit. Thirty-three (75%) preprint platforms provided details about article screening (basic checks) and 14 (32%) of these actively involved researchers with context expertise in the screening process. The three most common screening checks related to the scope of the article, plagiarism and legal/ethical/societal issues and compliance. Almost all preprint platforms allow submission to any peer-reviewed journal following publication, have a preservation plan for read-access, and most have a policy regarding reasons for retraction and the sustainability of the service. Forty-one (93%) platforms currently have usage metrics, with the most common metric being the number of downloads presented on the abstract page. Conclusion: A large number of preprint platforms exist for use in biomedical and medical sciences, all of which offer researchers an opportunity to rapidly disseminate their research findings onto an open-access public server, subject to scope and eligibility. However, the process by which content is screened before online posting and withdrawn or removed after posting varies between platforms, which may be associated with platform operation, ownership, governance and financing.

 

Caselaw Access Project Downloads Now Available | Library Innovation Lab

“Today we’re announcing CAP downloads, a new way to access select datasets relating to the Caselaw Access Project. While researchers can use our API and bulk data to access standardized metadata and text for all of the cases in the CAP dataset, we also want to make it possible to share specialized and derivative datasets….

To view and access what’s currently available, visit case.law/download. We’re starting with:

Scanned images of cases from open access jurisdictions (AR, IL, NC, NM), available as PDFs: case.law/download/PDFs/
A spreadsheet mapping metadata in CAP to metadata from the Supreme Court Database (SCDB): case.law/download/scdb/
Images and illustrations found in published case law: case.law/download/illustrations/ …”

Caselaw Access Project Downloads Now Available | Library Innovation Lab

“Today we’re announcing CAP downloads, a new way to access select datasets relating to the Caselaw Access Project. While researchers can use our API and bulk data to access standardized metadata and text for all of the cases in the CAP dataset, we also want to make it possible to share specialized and derivative datasets….

To view and access what’s currently available, visit case.law/download. We’re starting with:

Scanned images of cases from open access jurisdictions (AR, IL, NC, NM), available as PDFs: case.law/download/PDFs/
A spreadsheet mapping metadata in CAP to metadata from the Supreme Court Database (SCDB): case.law/download/scdb/
Images and illustrations found in published case law: case.law/download/illustrations/ …”