Nature’s 10 : Nature News & Comment

One of the 10 is Alexandra Elbakyan, creator of Sci-Hub.

“It is copyright-breaking on a grand scale — and has brought Elbakyan praise, criticism and a lawsuit. Few people support the fact that she acted illegally, but many see Sci-Hub as advancing the cause of the open-access movement, which holds that papers should be made (legally) free to read and reuse. “What she did is nothing short of awesome,” says Michael Eisen, a biologist and open-access supporter at the University of California, Berkeley. “Lack of access to the scientific literature is a massive injustice, and she fixed it with one fell swoop.”

For the first few years of its existence, the site flew under the radar — but eventually it grew too big for subscription publishers to ignore. In 2015, the Dutch company Elsevier, supported by the wider publishing industry, brought a US lawsuit against Elbakyan on the basis of copyright infringement and hacking. If Elbakyan loses, she risks having to pay many millions of dollars in damages, and potentially spending time in jail. (For that reason, Elbakyan does not disclose her current location and she was interviewed for this article by encrypted e-mail and messaging.) In 2015, a US judge ordered Sci-Hub to be shut down, but the site popped up on other domains. It’s most popular in China, India and Iran, she says, but a good 5% or so of its users come from the United States….”

Nature’s 10 : Nature News & Comment

One of the 10 is Alexandra Elbakyan, creator of Sci-Hub.

“It is copyright-breaking on a grand scale — and has brought Elbakyan praise, criticism and a lawsuit. Few people support the fact that she acted illegally, but many see Sci-Hub as advancing the cause of the open-access movement, which holds that papers should be made (legally) free to read and reuse. “What she did is nothing short of awesome,” says Michael Eisen, a biologist and open-access supporter at the University of California, Berkeley. “Lack of access to the scientific literature is a massive injustice, and she fixed it with one fell swoop.”

For the first few years of its existence, the site flew under the radar — but eventually it grew too big for subscription publishers to ignore. In 2015, the Dutch company Elsevier, supported by the wider publishing industry, brought a US lawsuit against Elbakyan on the basis of copyright infringement and hacking. If Elbakyan loses, she risks having to pay many millions of dollars in damages, and potentially spending time in jail. (For that reason, Elbakyan does not disclose her current location and she was interviewed for this article by encrypted e-mail and messaging.) In 2015, a US judge ordered Sci-Hub to be shut down, but the site popped up on other domains. It’s most popular in China, India and Iran, she says, but a good 5% or so of its users come from the United States….”

Nutzung von Zeitschriften verdoppelt sich dank Open Access

From Google’s English: “Under SCOAP³ from professional journals of high-energy physics research open access are provided. SCOAP³ or Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics is an international consortium that has published 13,400 articles Open Access in the first funding period (2014 to 2016). 60% of all downloads were based on two SpringerNature magazines [1], 28% of the downloads on two Elsevier magazines [2].

Both publishers have now announced that the number of downloads from these journals has doubled since they joined SCOAP³ on 01.01.2014….”

Progress from Bioline International | Electronic Publishing Trust for Development

“In celebration of Open Access week, Bioline International can report that, in the single month of October 2016, more than 1,350,000 full text downloads of articles were made from bioscience journals published in 16 developing countries. Usage statistics are reported on the fly from the web site, see http://www.bioline.org.br/, right hand side of home page. This highhttp://www.bioline.org.br/ usage demonstrates the importance of research from these regions to the progress of international science.

A recently launched online survey of users has recorded some 250 responses to date from 59 countries – see http://bioline.org.br/survey for the results so far. We are hoping to establish which particular aspects of Bioline make the site so well-used – is it because it is Open Access, or is it because the information is difficult to find elsewhere, or . . .? …”

Open Access Week 2016: researcher spotlight – science and technology | Library Matters: RGU Library Blog

“OpenAIR was a very early open access repository at a university, putting RGU at the leading edge of what we know now as Green Open Access publishing.”

ETD’s at Harvard

Since the launch of ETDs @ Harvard in 2014, nineteen Schools, Departments, and Programs have adopted it to manage their student theses and dissertations….

ETDs @ Harvard streamlines the submission process for students, faculty, and administrators, and pipes student data and files to several downstream systems. Once a student submits her work, and it is approved, ETDs @ Harvard sends it to DASH, the Harvard open-access repository, HOLLIS+, the Harvard Library catalog, DRS, the Harvard Library digital preservation system, and the printer, for producing bound copies for the Harvard University Archives or Countway Library….

[W]e’ve deposited 2,853 ETDs [since 2011], which have been downloaded 624,594 times, an average of 219 downloads each….

2016 is a year of rapid and continuing progress for DASH

“2016 is a year of rapid and continuing progress for DASH, Harvard’s open-access repository. Before the end of the year we’ll pass the milestone of nine million downloads, with more than 2.5 million in 2016 alone, our best year ever. We expect to add more than 6,100 this year, surpassing last year. We deposit more than 500 articles per month, and the average work in DASH has been downloaded 300 times….”

SCOAP3 journals double downloads – SCOAP3

“Elsevier announced that downloads to their two journals, Physics Letters B and Nuclear Physics B have doubled since they became Open Access at the start of SCOAP3 in January 2014. This increase is remarkable as SCOAP3 covers the most recent 3,500 articles in the journals, while most of the historic content of over 77,000 articles, is available to subscribers.

SpringerNature announced that since January 2014 they have observed a doubling of  downloads across their two learned-society journals participating in SCOAP3: European Physical Journal C and the Journal of High Energy Physics.”