Ten myths around open scholarly publishing [PeerJ Preprints]

Abstract:  The changing world of scholarly communication and the emergence of ‘Open Science’ or ‘Open Research’ has brought to light a number of controversial and hotly-debated topics. Yet, evidence-based rational debate is regularly drowned out by misinformed or exaggerated rhetoric, which does not benefit the evolving system of scholarly communication. The aim of this article is to provide a baseline evidence framework for ten of the most contested topics, in order to help frame and move forward discussions, practices and policies. We address preprints and scooping, the practice of copyright transfer, the function of peer review, and the legitimacy of ‘global’ databases. The presented facts and data will be a powerful tool against misinformation across wider academic research, policy and practice, and may be used to inform changes within the rapidly evolving scholarly publishing system.

The Role of Preprints in Journal Publishing

“The increase in preprint use, along with scholars publicly coming together to endorse preprints, such as those at the 2016 ASAPbio meeting, is forcing journal publishers to address the place of preprints in the publishing landscape. Despite “preprint” sounding like something reserved for pre-publication, “preprint” servers and published journals don’t have to be as separate as their names suggest. Many journals are now allowing and even encouraging scholars to publish preprint versions of their works in addition to formal articles to make their research Green OA. Authors can link their preprint articles to the DOI of the formal published version to connect the two. Going a step further, some journals are even pioneering preprint publishing models, wherein they host final articles on preprint servers in order to make research fully open access….”

Openness: An interview with Daniel Hook, CEO of Digital Science – The Scholarly Kitchen

I think that biggest barrier is the existing system of incentives – people are not made professor for making their research openly available — that needs to change. The current system was never built to scale to the current size of the research world. I think that there will be some radical changes in scholarly communication and evaluation. Research, however, is quite rightly a conservative world. Systems need to be tried and tested – we can’t afford to switch to a system that is susceptible to effects like fake news.  So, I don’t think that change will happen quickly….

As a researcher, I want it to be simple. I don’t want to have to find money from different pots to publish my work. I don’t want to have to understand licensing and copyright law nor do I want to have to understand if my funder’s requirements are at odds with my institution’s requirements of me or indeed my government’s views on what constitutes open. I also really don’t want to have to go through the same thing with my data and my software as well as my journal article. So, in short, yes, I do think that there needs to be simplification. Not wanting to wade into the minefield that is Plan S, I will say that one thing that must be welcome to everyone is that there is now clear coordination going on between different stakeholders. Ideally this would lead to a framework or standard that allows stakeholders to adopt or to sign up to a standardized set of Open Access requirements that are internally consistent and easy to understand….”

Analyze the impact of the rising Open Access movement on your organization – Dimensions

Open Access is an integral part of the journey to a more collaborative research environment and continues to grow in importance across a variety of communities, including publishers, funders, librarians and of course the academic research community. Open Access in combination with Open Data has quickly become a key issue impacting both the quantity and the quality of scholarly communications.

In this recently published Digital Science Research report, Dimensions data were used to explore the implications that restricted access may impose and analyze current Open Access trends. Some of the reports key findings include that the volume of Open Access articles has clearly been rising in recent years and that countries that have invested in Open Access have typically increased their level of international collaboration.

All this and more can be discovered through Dimensions’ rich data and analytical capabilities as we recently developed and released a number of updates and new features which will help you to gain richer and more precise insights about Open Access for your organization.

Dimensions provides multiple filters to easily display results which are Open Access. Our filters are built around the four most commonly used basic classifications:

  • Bronze – available on websites hosted by their publisher, either immediately or following an embargo, but are not formally licensed for reuse.
  • Green – freely available somewhere other than the publisher’s website, e.g. in a subject or university repository, or the author’s personal website. Applies to self-archiving generally of the pre or post-print or potentially after an embargo period
  • Gold – refers to articles in fully accessible open access journals that are available immediately upon publication without a license
  • Hybrid – refers to subscription journals with open access to individual articles usually when a fee is paid to the publisher or journal by the author, the author’s organization, or the research funder….

Say you wanted to know how many gold Open Access papers by the University of Oxford, funded by the Wellcome Trust, were published in Springer Nature journals between 2013 – 2018? We made discovering that easy as you can see in the screenshot below….”

Analyze the impact of the rising Open Access movement on your organization – Dimensions

Open Access is an integral part of the journey to a more collaborative research environment and continues to grow in importance across a variety of communities, including publishers, funders, librarians and of course the academic research community. Open Access in combination with Open Data has quickly become a key issue impacting both the quantity and the quality of scholarly communications.

In this recently published Digital Science Research report, Dimensions data were used to explore the implications that restricted access may impose and analyze current Open Access trends. Some of the reports key findings include that the volume of Open Access articles has clearly been rising in recent years and that countries that have invested in Open Access have typically increased their level of international collaboration.

All this and more can be discovered through Dimensions’ rich data and analytical capabilities as we recently developed and released a number of updates and new features which will help you to gain richer and more precise insights about Open Access for your organization.

Dimensions provides multiple filters to easily display results which are Open Access. Our filters are built around the four most commonly used basic classifications:

  • Bronze – available on websites hosted by their publisher, either immediately or following an embargo, but are not formally licensed for reuse.
  • Green – freely available somewhere other than the publisher’s website, e.g. in a subject or university repository, or the author’s personal website. Applies to self-archiving generally of the pre or post-print or potentially after an embargo period
  • Gold – refers to articles in fully accessible open access journals that are available immediately upon publication without a license
  • Hybrid – refers to subscription journals with open access to individual articles usually when a fee is paid to the publisher or journal by the author, the author’s organization, or the research funder….

Say you wanted to know how many gold Open Access papers by the University of Oxford, funded by the Wellcome Trust, were published in Springer Nature journals between 2013 – 2018? We made discovering that easy as you can see in the screenshot below….”

Visiting Scholar: Preprint Uptake and Use Project – scholcommlab

“The ScholCommLab and ASAPbio are seeking a Visiting Scholar to collaborate with us on a special project about preprints uptake and use (details below). This funded position is open to faculty, postdoctoral researchers, and graduate students (enrolled full-time at an accredited institution) interested in joining us for a 2-4 month long research stay in Vancouver, Canada….”

Visiting Scholar: Preprint Uptake and Use Project – scholcommlab

“The ScholCommLab and ASAPbio are seeking a Visiting Scholar to collaborate with us on a special project about preprints uptake and use (details below). This funded position is open to faculty, postdoctoral researchers, and graduate students (enrolled full-time at an accredited institution) interested in joining us for a 2-4 month long research stay in Vancouver, Canada….”

Open-access pioneer Randy Schekman on Plan S and disrupting scientific publishing

Nobel laureate Randy Schekman shook up the publishing industry when he launched the open-access journal eLife in 2012.

Armed with millions in funding from three of the world’s largest private biomedical charities — the Wellcome Trust, the Max Planck Society and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute — Schekman designed the journal to compete with publishing powerhouses such as NatureScience and Cell. (Nature’s news team is independent of its journal team and its publisher, Springer Nature.)

eLife experimented with innovative approaches such as collaborative peer review — in which reviewers work together to vet research — that caused ripples in scientific publishing.

And for the first few years, researchers could publish their work in eLife for free. That came to an end in 2017, because the journal needed more revenue streams to help it to grow….”

Scholarly Communication and Open Access in Psychology: Current Considerations for Researchers

Abstract:  Scholarly communication and open access practices in psychological science are rapidly evolving. However, most published works that focus on scholarly communication issues do not target the specific discipline, and instead take a more “one size fits all” approach. When it comes to scholarly communication, practices and traditions vary greatly across the disciplines. It is important to look at issues such as open access (of all types), reproducibility, research data management, citation metrics, the emergence of preprint options, the evolution of new peer review models, coauthorship conventions, and use of scholarly networking sites such as ResearchGate and Academia.edu from a disciplinary perspective. Important issues in scholarly publishing for psychology include uptake of authors’ use of open access megajournals, how open science is represented in psychology journals, challenges of interdisciplinarity, and how authors avail themselves of green and gold open access strategies. This overview presents a discipline-focused treatment of selected scholarly communication topics that will allow psychology researchers and others to get up to speed on this expansive topic. Further study into researcher behavior in terms of scholarly communication in psychology would create more understanding of existing culture as well as provide early career researchers with a more effective roadmap to the current landscape. As no other single work provides a study of scholarly communication and open access in psychology, this work aims to partially fill that niche.

Surveying the landscape of products and services for sharing preprints – ASAPbio

“We are currently surveying the landscape of preprint servers and platforms and are aware of 15 different products or services in use or in development for sharing preprints. 

With over 1000 new corresponding authors now posting a preprint in the life sciences each month, the adoption of preprinting has been increasing rapidly. While the majority of the growth is currently driven by submissions to bioRxiv, which accepts preprints across the life and biomedical sciences, several preprint servers and platforms have launched in recent years to serve individual research areas and communities. Following developments in the landscape over the past two years, preprint server operators now have a range of products and services to choose between. Today, we share a listing of the preprint server products and services known to ASAPbio. We welcome feedback and information from product owners, service operators and preprint server owners to grow and improve this independent listing….”