Why figshare? Choosing a new technical infrastructure for 4TU.ResearchData | Open Working

“4TU.ResearchData is an international repository for research data in science, engineering and design. After over 10 years of using Fedora, an open source repository system, to run  4TU.ResearchData, we have made a decision to migrate a significant part of our technical infrastructure to a commercial solution offered by figshare. Why did we decide to do it? Why now, at a time of increasing concerns about relying on proprietary solutions, particularly associated with large publishing houses, to run scholarly communication infrastructures? (see for example, In pursuit of open science, open access is not enough and the SPARC Landscape Analysis)

We anticipate that members of our community, as well as colleagues that use or manage scholarly communications infrastructures might be wondering the same. We are therefore explaining our thinking in this blogpost, hoping it will facilitate more discussion about such developments in the scholarly communications infrastructure….”

Open Metrics Require Open Infrastructure

“Today, Zenodo announced their intentions to remove the altmetrics.com badges from their landing pages–and we couldn’t be more energized by their commitment to open infrastructure, supporting their mission to make scientific information open and free.

“We strongly believe that metadata about records including citation data & other data used for computing metrics should be freely available without barriers” – Zenodo Leadership….

In light of emerging needs for metrics and our work at Make Data Count (MDC) to build open infrastructure for data metrics, we believe that it is necessary for corporations or entities that provide analytics and researcher tools to share the raw data sources behind their work. In short, if we trust these metrics enough to display on our websites or add to our CVs, then we should also demand that they be available for us to audit….

These principles are core to our mission to build the infrastructure for open data metrics. As emphasis shifts in scholarly communication toward “other research outputs” beyond the journal article, we believe it is important to build intentionally open infrastructure, not repeating mistakes made in the metrics systems developed for articles. We know that it is possible for the community to come together and develop the future of open metrics, in a non-prescriptive manner, and importantly built on completely open and reproducible infrastructure.”

Open Access Pakistan | Zenodo

“The official [Zenodo] channel of Open Access Pakistan. For further information, contact pak.openaccess@gmail.com….

For Scholars: Pakistani Scholars are encouraged to submit their published research to Open Access Pakistan (OA-PK) Zenodo commnity.

For Publishers: All Pakistani Journals are welcomed to upload their published articles in this database Free of cost for indexation in multiple databases across the globe.

This community is maintained by Open Access Pakistan team for purpose of expanding Open Research in Pakistan….”

Funded Partnership Brings Dryad and Zenodo Closer | Dryad news and views

“With increasing mandates and initiatives around open data and software, researchers commonly have to make a choice about where to deposit their non-article outputs. Unfortunately, systems that are built to accommodate these objects work separately and can make the process more difficult. As a result, data, code, figures, and other outputs go to a variety of disconnected places, or improper homes (i.e. code with the wrong license or data not curated). To tackle this issue, and make open research best practices more seamless for researchers, we are thrilled to announce a partnership between Dryad and Zenodo….

To jumpstart this collaboration, we are proud to have been awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation grant that will enable us to co-develop new solutions focused on supporting researcher and publisher workflows as well as best practices in data and software curation. By focusing on integrations between our systems, leveraging data and software expertise, we can both extend the reach of our services and open up more opportunities for broader research communities.  We are looking forward to re-imagining the submission process for researchers and how we can better support our journal publishing and institutional communities along the way….”

Expanded access to images in the Biodiversity Literature Repository

“The Biodiversity Literature Repository at Zenodo is holding now over 160,000 figures originally included in scientific publications and is daily updated. Each image is open access. It has a link to the original source – also included in the image metadata – and to related items, such as the taxonomic treatment that cites the image. Originally, Zenodo has been created as a repository for the deposition of single documents, research data, files, but with an option to automate the upload (and download) automatically using its API….”

Open Access, Academia.edu, and why I’m all-in on Zenodo.org | Pocket Change

“Migrating from Academia.edu to Zenodo.org

I fully advocate leaving Academia.edu, but what purpose does it serve to simply delete your account? You are removing publications that are, in the very least, freely and openly available at the moment. Essentially, the best decision is to migrate documents to Zenodo.org, and allow at least one week for Google to fully index migrated content before deleting the Academia.edu account. My MA thesis entitled ‘Recent Advances in Roman Numismatics,’ about the application of Linked Open Data methodologies toward Roman numismatics with Nomisma.org and Online Coins of the Roman Empire, had been available in both the ANS Digital Library and Academia.edu as of January 28, 2016. Due to our superior use of microdata and full-text indexing, the ANS Digital Library version surpassed Academia days after it was published. I uploaded my thesis to Zenodo.org January 29, 2016, and it was already on the first page of Google three days later.

Many of us have uploaded a substantial number of documents to Academia.edu, and it might be tedious to re-upload these documents into a new system, especially with regard to re-entering publication metadata. I have sought to rectify this by facilitating a more efficient migration system. I have developed a framework that is capable of parsing metadata from an Academia.edu profile (although not all publications are listed when the profile page loads), accepting re-uploaded documents (since these cannot be extracted from Academia.edu directly), and uploading these contents into Zenodo.org. This framework itself is open source and available on Github. I will save the technical discussion for different venue.”

GitHub and more: sharing data & code | Innovations in Scholarly Communication

“Among those researchers that do archive and share data, GitHub is indeed the most often used, but just as many people indicate using ‘others’ (i.e. tools not mentioned as one of the preselected options). Figshare comes in third, followed by Bitbucket, Dryad, Dataverse, Zenodo and Pangaea (Figure 3)….Another surprising finding is the overall low use of Zenodo – a CERN-hosted repository that is the recommended archiving and sharing solution for data from EU-projects and -institutions. The fact that Zenodo is a data-sharing platform that is available to anyone (thus not just for EU project data) might not be widely known yet….”