The Open Future of Neuroscience Research and Innovation – Western University

“Speaker: Dylan Roskams-Edris, Open Science Alliance Officer, Tanenbaum Open Science Institute, The Neuro 

In his role as Open Science Alliance Officer for TOSI and The Neuro, Dylan interfaces with the national and global open science communities to promote the uptake of open science tools and practices in Canadian neuroscience research. His background in Neuroscience, Health Ethics, and law gives him the breadth of expertise neeeded to recognize the critical challenges that face open neuroscience and promote the solutions needed to overcome them. Drawing from both global examples and the experience of The Neuro as the worlds first open science biomedical research institute, this talk he will discuss the importance of open science for the future of both basic neuroscience research and the translation from basic discoveries to healthcare innovations. …”

Julich-Brain: A 3D probabilistic atlas of the human brain’s cytoarchitecture | Science

Abstract:  Cytoarchitecture is a basic principle of microstructural brain parcellation. Here we introduce Julich-Brain, a 3D atlas containing cytoarchitectonic maps of cortical areas and subcortical nuclei. The atlas is probabilistic to consider variations between individual brains. Building such an atlas was highly data- and labor-intensive and required to develop nested, interdependent workflows for detecting borders between brain areas, data processing, provenance tracking, and flexible execution of processing chains to handle large amounts of data at different spatial scales. Gap maps complement cortical maps to achieve full cortical coverage. The atlas concept is dynamic, i.e., continuously adapted with progress in mapping, openly available to support neuroimaging studies of healthy subjects and patients, as well as modeling and simulation, and interoperable, to link with other atlases and recourses.

 

Julich-Brain: A 3D probabilistic atlas of the human brain’s cytoarchitecture | Science

Abstract:  Cytoarchitecture is a basic principle of microstructural brain parcellation. Here we introduce Julich-Brain, a 3D atlas containing cytoarchitectonic maps of cortical areas and subcortical nuclei. The atlas is probabilistic to consider variations between individual brains. Building such an atlas was highly data- and labor-intensive and required to develop nested, interdependent workflows for detecting borders between brain areas, data processing, provenance tracking, and flexible execution of processing chains to handle large amounts of data at different spatial scales. Gap maps complement cortical maps to achieve full cortical coverage. The atlas concept is dynamic, i.e., continuously adapted with progress in mapping, openly available to support neuroimaging studies of healthy subjects and patients, as well as modeling and simulation, and interoperable, to link with other atlases and recourses.

 

Addgene’s AAV Data Hub | Open Neuroscience

“AAV are versatile tools used by neuroscientists for expression and manipulation of neurons. Many scientists have benefited from the high-quality, ready-to-use AAV prep service from Addgene, a nonprofit plasmid repository. However, it can be challenging to determine which AAV tool and techniques are best to use for an experiment. Scientists also may have questions about how much virus to inject or which serotype or promoter should be used to target the desired neuron or brain region. To help scientists answer these questions, Addgene launched an open platform called the AAV Data Hub (https://datahub.addgene.org/aav/) which allows researchers to easily share practical experimental details with the scientific community (AAV used, in vivo model used, injection site, injection volumes, etc.). The goal of this platform is to help scientists find the best AAV tool for their experiments by reviewing combined data from a broad range of research labs. The AAV Data Hub launched in late 2019 and over 100 experiments have since been contributed to this project. The dataset includes details and images from experiments conducted in six different species and several different expression sites….”

Making (neuro)science accessible world-wide: Online seminars for the globe | Labs | eLife

“Initially aimed at the community of theorists, World Wide Neuro (Fig. 2) quickly grew to become a wider-scope repository for openly accessible and free-to-join online seminar announcements. The seminars we announce are organised autonomously by hosts from institutions all across the world, and cover a wide range of topics in neuroscience. In the early days after launching the site, we saw the creation of new seminar series: in Neurodevelopment, Vision research, and Invertebrate Neuroecology. These were created by group leaders and postdoctoral researchers who saw the opportunity to bring together a group of speakers for whom they would normally not have had the financial resources. Since then, other series have joined, e.g. NERV: a student-driven initiative from the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. More established seminar series have also started to post. Some of the existing series retain access “by registration only”, but this is something that we try to discourage as it creates unnecessary access barriers. After initial issues with Zoom bombing were fixed, we feel this restriction is no longer necessary….”

Letter to Elsevier re Neuron.pdf – Google Drive

“Elsevier’s flagship journal in neuroscience, Neuron, has played a vital role in contemporary neuroscience. As members of its Board, we have done our best to help it succeed, and we have collectively contributed over 1,550 papers to the journal. The times, however, have changed. Many neuroscientists in California and in Germany no longer access Neuron because their institutions will not renew their Elsevier subscription. Many neuroscientists across Europe will no longer submit to Neuron because of Plan S. A few days ago, Springer Nature agreed to comply with Plan S, setting Neuron’s key competitor Nature Neuroscience on the path to Open Access. We want Neuron to continue to thrive in the next decades. For this to happen, it must go full Open Access. If not immediately, we urge that it does so at least gradually, but with a clear timetable agreed with Plan S, and one that does not lag behind Nature Neuroscience. Otherwise, Neuron will wither. We hope you will be able to lead Elsevier to make the right decision, and make Neuron and its sister journals Open Access, just like Springer Nature has agreed to do. The writing is on the wall for journals with a paywall, and many of us can no longer serve in good faith on the Board of such journals.”

Journal research data sharing policies: a study of highly-cited journals in neuroscience, physics, and operations research | SpringerLink

“The practices for if and how scholarly journals instruct research data for published research to be shared is an area where a lot of changes have been happening as science policy moves towards facilitating open science, and subject-specific repositories and practices are established. This study provides an analysis of the research data sharing policies of highly-cited journals in the fields of neuroscience, physics, and operations research as of May 2019. For these 120 journals, 40 journals per subject category, a unified policy coding framework was developed to capture the most central elements of each policy, i.e. what, when, and where research data is instructed to be shared. The results affirm that considerable differences between research fields remain when it comes to policy existence, strength, and specificity. The findings revealed that one of the most important factors influencing the dimensions of what, where and when of research data policies was whether the journal’s scope included specific data types related to life sciences which have established methods of sharing through community-endorsed public repositories. The findings surface the future research potential of approaching policy analysis on the publisher-level as well as on the journal-level. The collected data and coding framework is provided as open data to facilitate future research and journal policy monitoring.

 

Journal research data sharing policies: a study of highly-cited journals in neuroscience, physics, and operations research | SpringerLink

“The practices for if and how scholarly journals instruct research data for published research to be shared is an area where a lot of changes have been happening as science policy moves towards facilitating open science, and subject-specific repositories and practices are established. This study provides an analysis of the research data sharing policies of highly-cited journals in the fields of neuroscience, physics, and operations research as of May 2019. For these 120 journals, 40 journals per subject category, a unified policy coding framework was developed to capture the most central elements of each policy, i.e. what, when, and where research data is instructed to be shared. The results affirm that considerable differences between research fields remain when it comes to policy existence, strength, and specificity. The findings revealed that one of the most important factors influencing the dimensions of what, where and when of research data policies was whether the journal’s scope included specific data types related to life sciences which have established methods of sharing through community-endorsed public repositories. The findings surface the future research potential of approaching policy analysis on the publisher-level as well as on the journal-level. The collected data and coding framework is provided as open data to facilitate future research and journal policy monitoring.

 

Gairdner Foundation recognizes Dr. Guy Rouleau with prestigious award | The Neuro – McGill University

“The Neuro’s director has been a driving force in neurological disease research and Open Science leadership….

Since joining The Neuro in 2013, Dr. Rouleau has spearheaded its Open Science initiative, which is breaking down barriers to medical discovery by encouraging the sharing of data and reagents across institutions. In order to understand the brain and discover new treatments and cures for patients, Dr. Rouleau believes scientists must take advantage of all the information and reagents being generated by the many different groups around the world….”

Gairdner Foundation recognizes Dr. Guy Rouleau with prestigious award | The Neuro – McGill University

“The Neuro’s director has been a driving force in neurological disease research and Open Science leadership….

Since joining The Neuro in 2013, Dr. Rouleau has spearheaded its Open Science initiative, which is breaking down barriers to medical discovery by encouraging the sharing of data and reagents across institutions. In order to understand the brain and discover new treatments and cures for patients, Dr. Rouleau believes scientists must take advantage of all the information and reagents being generated by the many different groups around the world….”