Virtual workshop: How repositories can contribute their FAIR share

“Findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR) data are an increasingly important aspect of open scholarship. Increasing the production and use of FAIR data requires a wide range of stakeholders across the research ecosystem to actively play their parts. FAIRsFAIR – Fostering Fair Data Practices in Europe – aims to supply practical solutions for applying the FAIR data principles throughout the research data life cycle, which can be included in the strategies that research organisations and implemented to enable a FAIR data culture.

This 90 minute virtual workshop will focus on the work FAIRsFAIR carries out in collaboration with repositories  to enable them to play their role in helping to make and keep data FAIR over time. We will present an early draft of a transition support programme for repositories wishing to improve their capacity to support FAIR data production and use. Following an overview of the draft programme, attendees will participate in group discussions and activities to review and discuss the draft support programme, consider how it might be applied within their own repositories, and how they can support and promote relevant aspects of the programme within their institutions and the wider community….”

The National Academic Digital Repository of Ethiopia – Technical, Policy and Governance Aspects | National Academic Digital Repository of Ethiopia

“FAIR principles compliant digital repositories are deemed key enablers of Open Science. The National Academic Digital Repository of Ethiopia (NADRE) is the deposit service indicated in the National Open Access Policy of Ethiopia for Higher Education and is meant to provide researchers, lecturers, students as well as stakeholders from outside of the academic world access to all research published by Ethiopian universities and research institutions.

In this presentation, given at a Virtual Meeting of the Open Repositories Conference (OR2020), we discuss the three intertwined aspects of the NADRE: (i) the policy, (ii) the governance and leadership, and (iii) the underlying standard-based technologies.

Concerning (i), we show the importance of the Ethiopian Ministry of Science and Higher Education’s commitment to introduce and establish the policy.

Concerning (ii), we show the systems, structures, concepts, rights and accountabilities for NADRE related processes in order to bring the NADRE alive and to work towards sustainability at the individual university level. 

Concerning (iii), we show the functionalities of the latest NADRE release and discuss the opportunities for other organizations in Africa and elsewhere to profit from the reuse and customization of the NADRE for their Open Science compliant digital repositories….”

Our response to the UKRI OA Review – F1000 Blogs

“To add precision to the requirements of the UKRI’s OA policy, it would be helpful for the UKRI to make clear that all types of research-based articles that are submitted for peer review at publication outlets that meet the UKRI’s qualifying standards/criteria (and for which some sort of payment is required to secure OA – predominantly though an ‘Article Processing Charge’ (APC)) are covered by the policy….

The UKRI also needs to be clear about when it will ‘pay’ to enable OA.  For example:

would the policy apply if ‘at least one author’ has UKRI HE funding? 
if there are multi-funded authors listed on an article, and one or more of the authors have access to funds to support OA, what is the role of each funder? (i.e. do they split the costs? Is there a lead? Etc) …

UKRI should require an author or their institution to retain copyright AND specific reuse rights, including rights to deposit the author’s accepted manuscript in a repository in line with the deposit and licensing requirements of UKRI’s OA policy….

 

UKRI OA funds should not be permitted to support OA publication in hybrid journals…

 

While there are some benefits around transformative agreements – not least in terms of the simplicity of achieving OA for authors! – we do worry that such ‘big deals’ can effectively reduce author choice around publishing venue, effectively lock out OA-born and smaller publishers and have the potential to create and exacerbate inequalities in access to research across the globe; this does not therefore represent good value to the public (nor does it guarantee any kind of a sustainable model of publishing).

We would advise UKRI to consider how and where transformative deals can have unintended consequences in terms of lock-ins (and potential cost tie-ins) with specific publishers (often those operating at scale) while effectively making OA-born publishers work harder to engage and access researchers. …”

Our response to the UKRI OA Review – F1000 Blogs

“To add precision to the requirements of the UKRI’s OA policy, it would be helpful for the UKRI to make clear that all types of research-based articles that are submitted for peer review at publication outlets that meet the UKRI’s qualifying standards/criteria (and for which some sort of payment is required to secure OA – predominantly though an ‘Article Processing Charge’ (APC)) are covered by the policy….

The UKRI also needs to be clear about when it will ‘pay’ to enable OA.  For example:

would the policy apply if ‘at least one author’ has UKRI HE funding? 
if there are multi-funded authors listed on an article, and one or more of the authors have access to funds to support OA, what is the role of each funder? (i.e. do they split the costs? Is there a lead? Etc) …

UKRI should require an author or their institution to retain copyright AND specific reuse rights, including rights to deposit the author’s accepted manuscript in a repository in line with the deposit and licensing requirements of UKRI’s OA policy….

 

UKRI OA funds should not be permitted to support OA publication in hybrid journals…

 

While there are some benefits around transformative agreements – not least in terms of the simplicity of achieving OA for authors! – we do worry that such ‘big deals’ can effectively reduce author choice around publishing venue, effectively lock out OA-born and smaller publishers and have the potential to create and exacerbate inequalities in access to research across the globe; this does not therefore represent good value to the public (nor does it guarantee any kind of a sustainable model of publishing).

We would advise UKRI to consider how and where transformative deals can have unintended consequences in terms of lock-ins (and potential cost tie-ins) with specific publishers (often those operating at scale) while effectively making OA-born publishers work harder to engage and access researchers. …”

Feedback and input on FAIR requirements for persistence and interoperability | FAIRsFAIR

“FAIRsFAIR is organising two workshops to gather input on the findings from an investigation into persistent identifier usage and semantic interoperability across European data infrastructures.

The findings are based on a review of projects and landmarks listed by the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) and various Research Data Alliance (RDA) groups and reveal a multiplicity of technical solutions and wide variation both within and between scientific domains. The report D2.1 Report on FAIR requirements for persistence and interoperability 2019 has been available for perusal and comments. Further feedback is now sought with a view to crystallising the recommendations for the next report….”

CAUL and AOASG welcome open access to scholarly content during the COVID-19 pandemic

“CAUL and AOASG welcome moves by commercial publishers to open up their content at this critical time. The rapid development of tests, potential treatments and vaccines to clinical trials has been made possible by the frictionless and immediate sharing of new and early stage research and data by researchers and access to previously paywalled content being provided by publishers. The speed with which many publishers have enabled open access to COVID-19 related content is commendable, and some have also taken the significant step of relaxing access restrictions to content more generally. It also demonstrates that open access to research should be the new norm. The time has come to make free and open access to all research a reality. It is critical that once the pandemic is over, in order to accelerate the global transition to free and open access, publishers do not once again restrict access to COVID-19 content. This will be especially crucial in light of the economic challenges all sectors of society will be facing, including universities dealing with constrained scholarly content budgets. Therefore, we urge publishers to make a commitment to: …”

Virtual OR2020 meetings – Open Repositories 2021

“Findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR) data are an increasingly important aspect of open scholarship. Increasing the production and use of FAIR data requires a wide range of stakeholders across the research ecosystem to actively play their parts. FAIRsFAIR – Fostering Fair Data Practices in Europe – aims to supply practical solutions for applying the FAIR data principles throughout the research data life cycle, which can be included in the strategies that research organisations and implemented to enable a FAIR data culture.

This 90 minute virtual workshop will focus on the work FAIRsFAIR carries out in collaboration with repositories  to enable them to play their role in helping to make and keep data FAIR over time. We will present an early draft of a transition support programme for repositories wishing to improve their capacity to support FAIR data production and use. Following an overview of the draft programme, attendees will participate in group discussions and activities to review and discuss the draft support programme, consider how it might be applied within their own repositories, and how they can support and promote relevant aspects of the programme within their institutions and the wider community….”