Reflections on Data Sharing Practices in Spinal Cord Injury Research | SpringerLink

Abstract:  There are few pharmacological therapeutics available for spinal cord injury despite years of preclinical and clinical research. This brief editorial discusses some of the shortcomings of translational research efforts. In addition, we comment on our previous experiences with data curation and highlight evolving efforts by the spinal cord injury research community to improve prospects for future therapeutic development, especially pertaining to preclinical data sharing through the Open Data Commons for Spinal Cord Injury (ODC-SCI).

Special Collection on Open Collaboration Across Geosciences – Eos

“Researchers from all geoscience disciplines are invited to collaborate on a special collection that describes experiences, ideas, and lessons learned about engaging in science following ICON-FAIR principles (integrated, coordinated, open, networked – findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable)….”

 

Data deposition required for all C19 Rapid Review publishers – OASPA

“The C19 Rapid Review Initiative – a large-scale collaboration of organisations across the scholarly publishing industry – has agreed to mandate data deposition across the original group of journals that set up the collaboration (eLife, F1000 Research, Hindawi, PeerJ, PLOS, Royal Society, FAIRsharing, Outbreak Science Rapid PREreview, GigaScience, Life Science Alliance, Ubiquity Press, UCL, MIT Press, Cambridge University Press, BMC, RoRi and AfricArXiv). New members aim to align in due course. 

The Initiative, which grew from a need to improve efficiency of peer review and publishing of crucial COVID-19 research, began in April 2020 and now involves over 20 publishers, industry experts, and scholarly communication organizations, supporting over 1,800 rapid reviewers across relevant fields. …”

Open Science in the Horizon Europe funding programme: what to expect? – DARIAH Open

“Without the slightest doubt, I think, we are all ready to let 2020 go and look forward to something different to come. In this forward-looking spirit, sharing information about the coming EU funding framework seems to be an appropriate topic for the last DARIAH Open post in 2020. As such, we are going to have a look at how Open Science is taking shape in the nascent Horizon Europe funding programme for 2021-2027, what to expect and what are the major changes compared to the previous funding programme, Horizon 2020. …

Open Access mandate is extended to long form publications such as books: Before going into details, let me highlight an important change that has the biggest significance for the SSH domains: that is, the full inclusion of  monographs and other long forms of scholarship can be expected under the HE Open Access mandate. [1] Although many details are yet unclear (e.g. whether this will be achieved through BPCs only or also through direct investments in publicly owned publishing infrastructure), this is a big step forward [2], especially compared to other funders’ mandates (such as Plan S), where Open Access publishing of books is usually swept aside or saved for later due to its inherent and sometimes quite complex deviations from that of journal articles, which are still considered as the mainstream units of scholarly communication. Keeping an eye on the incremental changes this new policy might bring in the OA book landscape as well as supporting the scholarly networks around DARIAH to comply with this genuinely inclusive OA mandate are absolute priorities for us in the near future. 

Immediate Open Access, no more embargos: Another change to expect  in HE’s OA policy is that the 6 or 12 months embargo period of H2020 is eliminated from HE: peer-reviewed scholarly publications stemming from HE projects must be immediately made available Open Access in a trusted repository (green OA) with PID and good quality metadata coming with a CC BY (or CC BY NC / ND / NC-ND for long-form publications). In addition to the open deposition, publishing Open Access (gold or diamond OA) is highly encouraged (publication in closed or hybrid venues will not be banned, but those  fees will not be eligible for reimbursement). …

Intellectual property rights stay with the authors/beneficiaries: In alignment with Plan S, beneficiaries/authors must retain the IPRs of their publications to comply with the OA mandates. (“Authors/beneficiaries must retain enough rights for open access.”) …”

 

Politics and Open Science: How the European Open Science Cloud Became Reality (the Untold Story) | Data Intelligence | MIT Press Journals

“It is fair to say note the word FAIR here that realizing se European Open Science Cloud (EOSO IS now part and parcel of the European data science policy In particular since EOSC will be from 2021 in the hands of the independent FOSC association and thus potentially way out of the so-called Brussels Bubble”.

This article will document the whole day of how EOSC emerged in this bubbler as one of the policy intentions to foster Open Science un Europe In addition, it will describe some of the typical non rational Toadblocks on the way to implement EOSC The article will also argue that the only way Europe can take care of its research data in a way that fits the European specificities fully, is by supporting EOSC….”

FAIR metrics and certification recommendations for EOSC | EOSCSecretariat

“Two further reports with recommendations have been released by the FAIR Working Group:

Recommendations on FAIR Metrics for EOSC – https://doi.org/10.2777/70791
Recommendations on certifying services required to enable FAIR within EOSC – https://doi.org/10.2777/127253 …”

OPERAS-GER: Vermittler zwischen europäischen und deutschen Forschungsinfrastrukturen (OPERAS-GER: Intermediary between European and German research infrastructures) | open-access.net

(translated via deepl.com)

Initiative for Open Access and Open Scholarly Communication in the Social Sciences and Humanities begins work The National Contact Point OPERAS-GER – a cooperation between OPERAS and the Max Weber Foundation – has started its work. The new service is intended to anchor the services and resources for science communication in the social sciences and humanities provided by OPERAS at the European level in the German science landscape and to create intensive networking between the research infrastructures of the EU and Germany. Further goals are to strengthen Open Science and promote the FAIR principles. As part of the OPERAS-GER project, the Max Weber Foundation, which has already been committed to Open Access in the social sciences and humanities since 2017, is planning a series of online seminars and lectures as well as application-oriented workshops for the new services starting in June 2021. The project is based at the Max Weber Institute’s office and will be funded by the Federal Ministry of Research and Education (BMBF) from October 2020, initially for three years. OPERAS (Open Scholarly Communication In The European Research Area For Social Sciences And Humanities) provides infrastructural services for research institutions, libraries and publishers that serve to better organise research activities and make research results more visible in the sense of Open Science. The Max Weber Foundation – German Humanities Institutes Abroad promotes research with a focus on the fields of history, cultural studies, economics and social sciences in selected countries with the aim of improving mutual understanding. It maintains ten institutes, other research groups and offices worldwide and provides infrastructures for research in the humanities and social sciences. Source: www.maxweberstiftung.de/presse/aktuelles-presse/einzelansicht-pressemeldungen/detail/News/start-der-nationalen-kontaktstelle.html

Open call for policy enhancement support | FAIRsFAIR

“Based on an initial landscape assessment and the work of related initiatives, FAIRsFAIR has prepared a series of recommendations for policy enhancement (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3686900) to support the realisation of a FAIR ecosystem. We invite expressions of interest from policy makers at all levels to work with us to assess their current policies against these recommendations and to consider how the policies might be adapted to better support the emergence of a FAIR ecosystem.

We are keen to work with policy makers in various settings (national, funding body, publisher, organisational, research infrastructure, repository) and at different levels of policy development and implementation….”

Recommendations on FAIR metrics for EOSC – Publications Office of the EU

Abstract:  The Recommendations on FAIR Metrics for EOSC document contains an analysis of activities relevant to the definition of FAIR Metrics in the EOSC context. It makes recommendations on the definition and implementation of metrics, proposes a set of metrics for FAIR data in EOSC to be extensively tested, offers an analysis of gaps and potential opportunities for extension, and defines priorities for future work. The report analyses recent and on-going activities relevant to the definition of FAIR metrics for data and other research objects at the European and international levels, in particular in the FAIRsFAIR project and RDA. It also discusses the maintenance of Turning FAIR into reality Recommendations and Action Plan and of the FAIR guiding principles themselves. It then offers seven recommendations on the definition and implementation of FAIR metrics.

 

How data sharing is accelerating railway safety research

“Andre?’s dataset was shortlisted for the Mendeley Data FAIRest Datasets Award, which recognizes researchers who make their data available for the research community in a way that exemplifies the FAIR Data Principles – Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable. The dataset was applauded for a number of reasons, not least the provision of clear steps to reproduce the data. What’s more, the data was clearly catalogued and stored in sub folders, with additional links to Blender and GitHub, making the dataset easily available and reproducible for all….”