Free Journal Network

“The purpose of this site is to promote scholarly journals run according to the Fair Open Access model (roughly, journals that are controlled by the scholarly community, and have no financial barriers to readers and authors – see the Fair Open Access Principles for full details). Such journals have a long history. Many are of high procedural quality, but  are less well known than commercial journals of similar or lower quality.

One main aim of this site is to help such journals to coordinate their efforts to accelerate the creation of a journal ecosystem that will out-compete the commercially controlled journals. Such efforts are complementary to the work of discipline-based organizations such as LingOAMathOAPsyOA, and the overarching FOAA, that focus primarily on converting commercially controlled subscription journals to Fair Open Access….”

The Consortium for a Transparent Transition to Open Access (TTOA): A cost-transparent combination of old and new

“The TTOA Consortium is an initiative of the Fair Open Access Alliance (www.fairopenaccess.org) and includes ‘native’ open access publishers, traditional subscription-based publishers, and open access publishers that do not charge authors: PLOS, MDPI, De Gruyter, Open Edition, Copernicus Publications, Ubiquity Press, Brill, and OLH. In addition to these publishers, the following organizations are collaborating partners: CWTS (Leiden University), QOAM, MPDL….

The TTOA [Transparent Transition to Open Access] Consortium has instead developed a different approach to manage the transition to open access, while embracing all the final features specified in the ORE Call for Tender….

The submission portal, archive, and publication platform would be financed by research funding organisations, while the peer-review and quality control are carried out by the journals of participating publishers. This infrastructure should be built from open-source software, operate under open standards, and be owned or hosted by non-profit organizations…..”

Fair Open Access Alliance

“The mission of the foundation is

a. to promote and support initiatives concerning (Fair) Open Access publications in the broadest sense;

b. to acquire resources and financially sustain (Fair) Open Access publications;

c. to support foundations financially and otherwise in various disciplines (xxxOA’s) that pursue the same goals;

d. to expand the Open Library of Humanities to other disciplines.

e. to propagate and promote the principles of Fair Open Access over all disciplines of science. “

KU Leuven supports a fair approach to scholarly publishing – Open Access Belgium

“KU Leuven launches the KU Leuven Fund for Fair Open Access, enabling the publication of scholarly books and articles in a way that is cost-effective, puts academics back in charge and benefits the public at large. For many years now, opposition against a commercial approach towards scholarly publishing has been growing stronger and stronger. The for-profit model leads to publications which are prohibitively expensive, either for the reader or for the researcher, and typically puts commercial partners in control of the dissemination of scholarly work since researchers have to transfer critical aspects of their author’s rights in order to get published. Alternatives such as Green Open Access (whereby researchers make an archival copy of their publication freely available to all), in most fields, do not challenge the traditional commercial publication model enough. Therefore, another alternative is on the rise, namely Fair Open Access. Publications in Fair Open Access are immediately freely available to all, are produced according to cost-effective (rather than commercial) principles and guarantee full control of researchers over the entire publication process. KU Leuven has been supporting Green Open Access for many years already, and now intensifies its efforts to maximize scholarly exchange, collaboration and innovation by creating the KU Leuven Fund for Fair Open Access, administered by KU Leuven Libraries. This fund provides financial support for the production costs of books published by Leuven University Press as well as articles in selected journals, on the condition that these journals are published according to the Fair Open Access model and maintain the highest academic standards. More information and application forms can be found here.”

Free Journal Network – Nurturing an ecosystem of high quality, open access, scholar-controlled journals with no author-facing charges

“The purpose of this site is to promote scholarly journals run according to the Fair Open Access model (roughly, journals that are controlled by the scholarly community, and have no financial barriers to readers and authors – see the Fair Open Access Principles for full details). Such journals have a long history. Many are of high procedural quality, but  are less well known than commercial journals of similar or lower quality.

One main aim of this site is to help such journals to coordinate their efforts to accelerate the creation of a journal ecosystem that will out-compete the commercially controlled journals. Such efforts are complementary to the work of discipline-based organizations such as LingOAMathOAPsyOA, and the overarching FOAA, that focus primarily on converting commercially controlled subscription journals to Fair Open Access….”

Harvard researchers to help develop cloud-based NIH Data Commons platform – Harvard Gazette

“The National Institute of Health has announced that Harvard co-Principal Investigators Dr. Mercè Crosas and Dr. Timothy Clark are NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase Awardees.

The awards are part of the National Institutes of Health’s new Data Commons program, which will be implemented in a 4-year pilot phase to explore the feasibility and best practices for making digital objects including very large-scale genomics resources, available and computable through collaborative platforms. This will be done on public clouds, virtual spaces where service providers make resources, such as applications and storage, available over the internet. The goal of the NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase is to accelerate biomedical discoveries by making biomedical research data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR) for more researchers….”

Data aggregators: a solution to open data issues – Open Knowledge International Blog

“Open Knowledge International’s report on the state of open data identifies the main problems affecting open government data initiatives. These are: the very low discoverability of open data sources, which were rightfully defined as being “hard or impossible to find”; the lack of interoperability of open data sources, which are often very difficult to be utilised; and the lack of a standardised open license, representing a legal obstacle to data sharing. These problems harm the very essence of the open data movement, which advocates data easy to find, free to access and to be reutilised.  

In this post, we will argue that data aggregators are a potential solution to the problems mentioned above.  Data aggregators are online platforms which store data of various nature at once central location to be utilised for different purposes. We will argue that data aggregators are, to date, one of the most powerful and useful tools to handle open data and resolve the issues affecting it.

We will provide the evidence in favour of this argument by observing how FAIR principles, namely Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability and Reusability, are put into practice by four different data aggregators engineered in Indonesia, Czech Republic, the US and the EU. …”

Data aggregators: a solution to open data issues – Open Knowledge International Blog

“Open Knowledge International’s report on the state of open data identifies the main problems affecting open government data initiatives. These are: the very low discoverability of open data sources, which were rightfully defined as being “hard or impossible to find”; the lack of interoperability of open data sources, which are often very difficult to be utilised; and the lack of a standardised open license, representing a legal obstacle to data sharing. These problems harm the very essence of the open data movement, which advocates data easy to find, free to access and to be reutilised.  

In this post, we will argue that data aggregators are a potential solution to the problems mentioned above.  Data aggregators are online platforms which store data of various nature at once central location to be utilised for different purposes. We will argue that data aggregators are, to date, one of the most powerful and useful tools to handle open data and resolve the issues affecting it.

We will provide the evidence in favour of this argument by observing how FAIR principles, namely Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability and Reusability, are put into practice by four different data aggregators engineered in Indonesia, Czech Republic, the US and the EU. …”