FAIRsFAIR

“FAIRsFAIR – Fostering Fair Data Practices in Europe – aims to supply practical solutions for the use of the FAIR data principles throughout the research data life cycle. Emphasis is on fostering FAIR data culture and the uptake of good practices in making data FAIR. FAIRsFAIR will play a key role in the development of global standards for FAIR certification of repositories and the data within them contributing to those policies and practices that will turn the EOSC programme into a functioning infrastructure.

In the end, FAIRsFAIR will provide a platform for using and implementing the FAIR principles in the day to day work of European research data providers and repositories. FAIRsFAIR will also deliver essential FAIR dimensions of the Rules of Participation (RoP) and regulatory compliance for participation in the EOSC. The EOSC governance structure will use these FAIR aligned RoPs to establish whether components of the infrastructure function in a FAIR manner….”

M3.5 Description of Transition Support Programme for Repositories for consultation – Google Docs

“FAIRsFAIR is working to better define good practice for repositories through our involvement in certification efforts that enable FAIR data. D3.5 “Description of transition support programme for repositories” describes a proposed programme of support which will help repositories to adopt these emerging good practices. There is a focus on supporting FAIR data provision, improved handling and integration of metadata, and an increased emphasis on data stewardship to ensure data remains FAIR in the long term….”

The never-ending story | Research Information

“At the same time, the REF open access mandate had just been announced, stating journal articles and some conference proceedings had to be publicly accessible within three months of acceptance for publication in order to be eligible for submission for the post-2014 research excellence framework. Given the double-whammy of easier depositing and REF urgency, WestminsterResearch saw self-deposits rocket from less than one per cent to more than 99 per cent while practice-based/non text-based entries mushroomed by 246 per cent.

‘The Haplo repository and REF open access mandate came at a similar time and the combined power of both led to this massive increase in self-deposits,’ highlights Watts. 

‘The mandates really helped people to comply to open access,’ she adds. ‘And we believe that factors contributing to more practice-based research included vastly improved templates and fields for these outputs… in the past, the repository just couldn’t take this content.’

Following these results and the looming REF2021, WestminsterResearch switched to a full Haplo open source-set up in 2018, and entries have continued to rise. As Watts put it: ‘I don’t think we’d have been able to support the increase in open access deposits without this rise in self-depositing.’…”

The never-ending story | Research Information

“At the same time, the REF open access mandate had just been announced, stating journal articles and some conference proceedings had to be publicly accessible within three months of acceptance for publication in order to be eligible for submission for the post-2014 research excellence framework. Given the double-whammy of easier depositing and REF urgency, WestminsterResearch saw self-deposits rocket from less than one per cent to more than 99 per cent while practice-based/non text-based entries mushroomed by 246 per cent.

‘The Haplo repository and REF open access mandate came at a similar time and the combined power of both led to this massive increase in self-deposits,’ highlights Watts. 

‘The mandates really helped people to comply to open access,’ she adds. ‘And we believe that factors contributing to more practice-based research included vastly improved templates and fields for these outputs… in the past, the repository just couldn’t take this content.’

Following these results and the looming REF2021, WestminsterResearch switched to a full Haplo open source-set up in 2018, and entries have continued to rise. As Watts put it: ‘I don’t think we’d have been able to support the increase in open access deposits without this rise in self-depositing.’…”

M3.5 Draft Description of FAIRsFAIR’s Transition Support Programme for Repositories | Zenodo

“FAIRsFAIR is working to better define good practice for repositories through our involvement in certification efforts that enable FAIR data. This draft document describes a proposed programme of support which will help repositories to adopt these emerging good practices. There is a focus on supporting FAIR data provision, improved handling and integration of metadata, and an increased emphasis on data stewardship to ensure data remains FAIR in the long term.

This brief description outlines some of the actions that can help repositories on their journey towards better alignment with the FAIR data principles and the support that FAIRSFAIR could provide. Please help us to shape the work FAIRsFAIR will do over the remainder of the project to develop and provide support for repositories of all types. We eagerly look for your feedback on:

the recommended actions – do these reflect your repository mission and aims? Have we missed something? 

the support that FAIRsFAIR could provide – are some of the suggested support areas more helpful for your repository than others? Is there anything missing? 

Please share your feedback with us by August 21, 2020 by adding comments to the working version using ‘Suggesting’ mode. From the feedback we receive, FAIRsFAIR will prioritise its activities to develop guidance and provide support. The prioritised plan will be shared in the final version of the support programme in October 2020 (D3.5 Transition Support Programme for Repositories). 

The working version for public comment is available at https://docs.google.com/document/d/1VXgrZZi23KrahihQ5Fp_Ym4IJ79FNKCWoridTzXlHOc/edit?usp=sharing  …”

FAIRsFAIR’s Transition Support Programme for Repositories | FAIRsFAIR

“Are you looking to make your repository content more findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR)? We have published a Draft Description of FAIRsFAIR’s Transition Support Programme for Repositories and your contributions are invited.

FAIRsFAIR is working to better define good practice for repositories through our involvement in certification efforts that enable FAIR data. We have now drafted a proposed programme of transition support to help repositories adopt these emerging good practices. There is a focus on supporting FAIR data provision, improving the handling and integration of metadata, and increasing the emphasis on data stewardship to ensure data remains FAIR in the long term. 

Please help us to shape the work we will do over the remainder of the project to develop and provide support for repositories of all types. In particular we are looking for your feedback on:

the recommended actions – do these reflect your repository mission and aims? Have we missed something?

the support that FAIRsFAIR could provide – are some of the suggested support areas more helpful for your repository than others? Is there anything missing?…”

Generalist Repository Comparison Chart | Zenodo

“The General Repository Comparison Chart and FAIRsharing Collection (https://fairsharing.org/collection/GeneralRepositoryComparison) is an outcome of the NIH Workshop on the Role of Generalist Repositories to Enhance Data Discoverability and Reuse held 11-12 February 2020 (workshop summary).  Following the workshop, representatives of the participating generalist repositories collaborated to develop a tool researchers could use to make decisions about selecting a general repository. We intend for the content to be dynamically updated through our partnership with FAIRsharing.  As we work towards that goal, we currently have a static version of the comparison.  

It is important to state that researchers should first determine if an appropriate domain repository exists for their research data.  Tools such as FAIRsharing.org and re3data.org can help with this determination. If using a domain repository is not possible, then a researcher should review both the general repository chart and consider their own institutional repository as a possible location to store their data.  Researchers need to comply with the requirements of their community, funder, country, publisher, and possibly others to ensure the best repository is selected. 

For those interested in continuing the discussion on the role of generalist repositories to enhance data discoverability and reuse, please consider joining the Research Data Alliance (RDA) and particularly the joint RDA/Force11 FAIRsharing WG (https://www.rd-alliance.org/group/fairsharing-registry-connecting-data-policies-standards-databases.html).  There is now an RDA Community to support conversation and a mailing list you join (https://www.rd-alliance.org/groups/generalist-repository-comparison-chart-management-group).  Watch for relevant sessions in the upcoming plenaries.”

Research Data Management and FAIR data: importance, challenges and opportunities. | Zenodo

“On Thursday, 28 May, the INOS project: Integrating Open and Citizen Science into active learning approaches in Higher Education organised a virtual Learning and Train-the-Trainer Activity (LTTA) targeting the project partner team. The main goal of the activity was to enhance the project partners’ skills in order for them to be able to deliver other Open Knowledge and Open Innovation Activities later in the project. LIBER, taking the lead on the training, organized a virtual training session on  Research Data Management entitled ‘Research Data Management (RDM) and FAIR data: importance, challenges and opportunities’. Our two trainers who led the session with lectures, discussions and an interactive game, were:

Dr Birgit Schmidt, Head of Knowledge Commons, Göttingen State and University Library

Dr Heather Andrews, Data Steward, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering,TU Delft …”

Research Data Management and FAIR data: importance, challenges and opportunities. | Zenodo

“On Thursday, 28 May, the INOS project: Integrating Open and Citizen Science into active learning approaches in Higher Education organised a virtual Learning and Train-the-Trainer Activity (LTTA) targeting the project partner team. The main goal of the activity was to enhance the project partners’ skills in order for them to be able to deliver other Open Knowledge and Open Innovation Activities later in the project. LIBER, taking the lead on the training, organized a virtual training session on  Research Data Management entitled ‘Research Data Management (RDM) and FAIR data: importance, challenges and opportunities’. Our two trainers who led the session with lectures, discussions and an interactive game, were:

Dr Birgit Schmidt, Head of Knowledge Commons, Göttingen State and University Library

Dr Heather Andrews, Data Steward, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering,TU Delft …”