Vernehmlassungsantwort zum Entwurf des Urheberrechtsgesetzes – Parldigi – Digitale Nachhaltigkeit

From Google’s English: “The Parliamentary Group on Digital Sustainability (Parldigi) is committed to the sustainable and innovative use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and calls for unrestricted public access to knowledge….The open access strategies of the universities serve not only to science, but also to the general public, and enable access and the long-term preservation of knowledge. However, Open Access can only be implemented in a targeted manner if (scientific) works can actually be published freely accessible. The Swiss Code of Obligations (OR) provides that the rights of the copyright holder are only transferred to the publisher for as long as it is necessary for the execution of the publishing contract (Article 381 para 1 OR). However, this provision may be amended by contract. As a rule, the publishers make use of this possibility by transferring copyrights in standard contracts or general terms and conditions (GTC) in full. In order to prevent this in the future and thus ensure that scientific publications can be made freely accessible to the interested public, a new, compelling provision is to be introduced in the framework of the revision of the URG. Concretely, we propose to supplement Art. 381 OR with the following paragraph:

Art. 381 para. 2 OR (new): 

The right to make a publicly funded contribution for a scientific journal or a scientific collection free of charge may be made available to the publisher. …”

Julia Reda – EU study finds even publishers oppose the ‘link tax’ – and some journalists are afraid to speak out

“A new study conducted upon request of the European Parliament finds that the planned extra copyright for news sites is a terrible idea. But MEPs may not learn about it until after they have voted on the controversial proposal….None of the editors or publishers interviewed think an extra copyright for news sites is a good idea….All journalists interviewed categorically reject paying for linking and the snippets that accompany links….”

Sen. Rand Paul Introduces Bill to Overhaul Federal Research Grant System | American Institute of Physics

“On Oct. 18, Paul introduced the “BASIC Research Act,” which would make several changes to peer review processes and would broaden public access requirements for grant applications and research results….In addition, the bill incorporates almost all of the “Fair Access to Science and Technology Research (FASTR) Act” …”

Act Now to Pass the FASTR Act – SPARC

“Below are ways in which you can help pass FASTR and spread the word about the positive effects this legislation will have on research, the academic community, entrepreneuers, students, and the general public. Now is the time to reach out to your Members of Congress and tell them at they should support FASTR!”

La reforma europea del Copyright: La amenaza del Open Access y de la Open Science ~ CanalBiblos: blog de la Biblioteca de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

From Google translate:

The European Copyright Reform: The threat of Open Access and Open Science
The coalition, led by SPARC Europe (The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and 15 other organizations representing the academic, library, research and digital rights communities have written an open letter to members of Parliament's Legal Affairs Committee European Parliament on the draft European Parliament Directive on Copyright in the Single Digital Market.

To extend neighbouring right for press publishers to scholarly publications would be a disaster for open science [interview] | DataScouting

“On the occasion of the proposed EU Copyright reform, which is currently undergoing a process in the European Parliament, representatives from three leading European libraries are asking Julia Reda, Member of the European Parliament with the Pirate Party about the challenges and the impact that the proposed copyright directive will have on libraries, institutional repositories, open science and more.”

LIBER Signs Open Letter To Halt Potentially Harmful Copyright Reform – LIBER

LIBER has signed an open letter directed at the EU’s Legal Affairs Committee (JURI), in an attempt to stop recent EU copyright reform developments which threaten Open Access and Open Science.

In the letter, LIBER and 14 other organisations express particular alarm at the potential impact of Article 11, which relates to Ancillary Copyright, and Article 13, which relates to filtering user-uploaded content, of the draft Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market.