Affordabee: Low-Cost Open Access Publishing – eLife Innovation Sprint 2020

“Adam is an MSc student at a local university in Kenya. He has to work part time to pay his school fees. Adam does the same through his research project to pay for bench fees at a local research institution. Through sweat and long nights, he manages to get a manuscript ready, as he has to publish to graduate. Adam recently attended a seminar where he was introduced to open science. He is excited about his first paper and wants to publish open access. His excitement is cut short when he realises he has to pay a US$3,000 article processing charge (APC) to get his manuscript published. What are his options? Are there publishers that can offer him a waiver or a subsidy? Or, are there some funding opportunities he can tap into for support?

We envision a platform that can help Adam identify journals that can offer him waivers or subsidies, and how to access them; a platform that will point him to funding opportunities to help cover the APC. We seek a platform that will reduce the APC cost barrier for students from resource-poor settings, like Adam. …”

Preprints & COVID-19 • covidpreprints

“The database is being actively maintiained & managed by Zhang-He Goh (@zhanghe_goh), Gautam Dey (@Dey_Gautam) & Jonny Coates (@JACoates91). For any queries or questions please contact Jonny at jonathon.coates@qmul.ac.uk or preLights at prelights@biologists.com

In addition, our thanks go out to the wider scientific community who are diligently assessing and communicating important preprints during this difficult time.

preLights is a community service supported by The Company of Biologists, the not-for-profit publisher of Development, Journal of Cell Science, Journal of Experimental Biology, Disease Models & Mechanisms and Biology Open. The Company of Biologists is also a UK charity, providing grants and other support for the scientific community. …”

Register Now for Open Source Community Call – Sept 2020 | FORCE11

“Join the Open Source Community Call co-hosted by FORCE11, Dryad, and eLife on September 29th, 3pm UTC (8am PDT, 11am EDT, 4pm BST)

Innovators share the latest updates and opportunities in the open-source space for research communication and publishing. Representatives from open source projects present in a ‘lightning talk’ format, 5 minutes or less, to share about projects and communities that are emerging or underway, so we can learn more about available open resources, where we can engage or contribute and consider where collaboration can contribute to the path forward….”

Welcome to a new ERA of reproducible publishing | Labs | eLife

“Since 2017, we have been working on the concept of computationally reproducible papers. The open-source suite of tools that started life as the Reproducible Document Stack is now live on eLife as ERA, the Executable Research Article, delivering a truly web-native format for taking published research to a new level of transparency, reproducibility and interactivity.

From today, authors with a published eLife paper can register their interest to enrich their published work with the addition of live code blocks, programmatically-generated interactive figures, and dynamically generated in-line values, using familiar tools like R Markdown and Jupyter in combination with Stencila Hub’s intuitive asset management and format conversion interface. The resulting new ERA publication will be presented as a complement to the original published paper. Very soon, a Google Docs plugin will also be made available to let authors insert executable code and data blocks into their documents using the cloud service.

Readers of ERA publications will be able to inspect the code, modify it, and re-execute it directly in the browser, enabling them to better understand how a figure is generated. They will be able to change a plot from one format to another, alter the data range of a specific analysis, and much more. All changes are limited to an individual’s browsing session and do not affect the published article, so anyone can experiment safely. Readers can also download the ERA publication – with all embedded code and data preserved – and use it as a basis for further study or derivative works….”

Innovation Leaders 2020: A summary | Labs | eLife

“The mission of the eLife Innovation Initiative is to support a community of open innovators who are developing tools to change the ways we discover, consume, evaluate and share research. Through organising the eLife Innovation Sprint and participating in other community events, we have seen a wealth of ideas and prototypes supporting these goals, but we’ve also realised that many of these projects are often not sustained beyond the Sprint events at which they are conceived.

This motivated us to start our eLife Innovation Leaders programme, a five-month open leadership training and mentorship course designed to empower innovators in the open-source-for-open-science community, to help them to lead and develop their tools and projects openly, and to think more strategically about long term project sustainability. The curriculum covered key topics in project ideation, launch and growth, such as design thinking, user research, prototyping, team building and marketing. We believe that projects are more likely to be sustainable when they are “open by design”– that they encompass carefully-designed processes for others to contribute to, and collaboratively develop, the project together.”

CoVis – Discover reliable COVID-19 research

“For the development of therapeutics and vaccines for COVID-19, scientists depend on reliable research results. To support them, Open Knowledge Maps and ReFigure have launched CoVis: a curated knowledge map of seminal works on COVID-19 from eight critical areas of biomedical research. The knowledge map is constantly evolving thanks to the collective editing of subject-matter experts.

CoVis enables you to spend less time reviewing coronavirus literature and more time on your research….

Unless otherwise noted, all content on CoVis is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The CoVis database is made available under CC0 (Public Domain Dedication). Our software is open source and hosted on Github….”

CoVis – Discover reliable COVID-19 research

“For the development of therapeutics and vaccines for COVID-19, scientists depend on reliable research results. To support them, Open Knowledge Maps and ReFigure have launched CoVis: a curated knowledge map of seminal works on COVID-19 from eight critical areas of biomedical research. The knowledge map is constantly evolving thanks to the collective editing of subject-matter experts.

CoVis enables you to spend less time reviewing coronavirus literature and more time on your research….

Unless otherwise noted, all content on CoVis is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The CoVis database is made available under CC0 (Public Domain Dedication). Our software is open source and hosted on Github….”

CoVis: a new tool to discover reliable COVID-19 research | Labs | eLife

“For the development of therapeutics and vaccines for COVID-19, scientists depend on validated knowledge on the coronavirus. But finding reliable research results is often difficult: with over 20,000 papers published on the topic in the last six months, scientists spend a lot of valuable time finding, reading and reviewing the literature.

CoVis is a new tool that enables scientists to kick-start their COVID-19 research. In this EU-funded project, experts compile seminal research in a freely accessible database. The resulting data is fed into a knowledge map, providing a quick and intuitive overview of the collected research output. Often key findings are addressed and substantiated by multiple research sources. In such cases, data and images from different sources are compiled into a visual dashboard called a ReFigure, to help readers quickly understand the various facets of the research topic….

CoVis is an open infrastructure following the principles of open science, and can therefore be fully reused. Content on CoVis is licensed under CC BY 4.0. The CoVis database is made available under CC0. Our software is open source and hosted on GitHub under the MIT license….”

CoVis: a new tool to discover reliable COVID-19 research | Labs | eLife

“For the development of therapeutics and vaccines for COVID-19, scientists depend on validated knowledge on the coronavirus. But finding reliable research results is often difficult: with over 20,000 papers published on the topic in the last six months, scientists spend a lot of valuable time finding, reading and reviewing the literature.

CoVis is a new tool that enables scientists to kick-start their COVID-19 research. In this EU-funded project, experts compile seminal research in a freely accessible database. The resulting data is fed into a knowledge map, providing a quick and intuitive overview of the collected research output. Often key findings are addressed and substantiated by multiple research sources. In such cases, data and images from different sources are compiled into a visual dashboard called a ReFigure, to help readers quickly understand the various facets of the research topic….

CoVis is an open infrastructure following the principles of open science, and can therefore be fully reused. Content on CoVis is licensed under CC BY 4.0. The CoVis database is made available under CC0. Our software is open source and hosted on GitHub under the MIT license….”