Open Access: Five Principles for Negotiations with Publishers – LIBER

“The principles are based on the experiences of LIBER libraries in the past two years, and aim to guide libraries and consortia as they shift from a reader-pays model (subscription licensing) to an author-pays model based on Article Processing Charges (APC)….”

ScienceGuide – What is the price per article?

In 2015 the Dutch universities reached a deal with the publishing houses. The ‘golden route’ was supposed to lead to more open access publictions. But at what price? Leo Waaijers took a look at the recently revealed contracts and did some calculations.”

OA2020

“Open Access 2020 is an international initiative that aims to induce the swift, smooth and scholarly-oriented transformation of today’s scholarly journals from subscription to open access publishing.

The principles of this initiative were discussed and agreed upon at the Berlin 12 Conference on 8-9 December 2015 and are embodied in an Expression of Interest, which has already been endorsed by numerous international scholarly organizations.

The practical steps that can be taken towards the envisaged transformation are outlined in a Roadmap.

All parties involved in scholarly publishing – particularly universities, research institutions, funders, libraries, and publishers – are invited to collaborate through OA2020 for a swift and efficient transition of scholarly publishing to open access.

This important initiative is open to further institutional signatories. …”

Transition to Open Access and its implications on Grey Literature Resources: EBSCOhost

Abstract:  This paper describes the transition to Open Access and its implications on grey literature resources. In this paper we will present current Open Access models, known as “offsetting deals”, which main intention is to avoid “double dipping”. This part will also review the role of library consortia in this process, as well as current Open Access policies in Europe. The second part of this paper will explore the role of grey literature in transition process to Open Access. Grey literature is an important source of original research and up to date information, although the lack of peer review and formal publication standards must be taken into account during an evaluation process. Grey literature plays an important role in the rapid and timely distribution of in-depth, recent, scientific and technical information, and also provides access to a broad range of information and often contains new ideas. Research that is not published in journals but available in other formats (such as reports, theses or conference proceedings) is often more detailed, more recent and sometimes more rapidly disseminated. Due to the competitive and time consuming nature of publishing in peer-reviewed academic journals, some research may never make into journals and would, therefore, be inaccessible to interested parties without the grey literature. We will present possible ways of increasing the visibility of grey literature repositories, their inclusion in open access databases, and how to connect these institutional grey literature repositories with current research information systems. 

44% of VU and VUmc scientific output is published Open Access in 2016 – [jul-sep] – University Library, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

“44% of all peer-reviewed publications of the VU and the VUmc are published Open Access.

This includes all articles, letters, reviews and books that are available immediately and permanently free for everyone to read and download on the website of the publisher. The policy of the Dutch universities is starting to pay off. During the past two years, universities have made agreements with publishers including Springer, Taylor & Francis and Elsevier about funding Open Access publishing.”

Whose money is it anyway? Managing offset agreements | Unlocking Research

“Sometimes an innocent question can blow up a huge discussion, and this is what happened recently at an RCUK OA Practitioner’s Group meeting when I asked what was appropriate for institutions to do when managing money they receive as refunds from publishers through offsetting arrangements.

When an institution pays for an article processing charge (APC) in a hybrid journal, it is doing so in addition to the existing subscription. This is generally referred to as ‘double dipping’.  I have written extensively about the issues with hybrid in the past, but here, I’d like to discuss the management of offset agreements.

Offset agreements are a compensation by a publisher to an institution for the extra money they are putting into the system through payment of APCs. Most large publishers have some sort of offset agreement for institutions in the UK which are negotiated by Jisc, based on the principles for offset agreements. (There is one significant publisher which is an exception because it insists there is no need for an offset agreement because it does not double dip.)….”

Cambridge/Netherlands agreement combines subscription and Open Access models for the first time « Librarians « Cambridge Core Blog

“Cambridge University Press has made an agreement with Dutch institutions which combines access to Cambridge’s subscription content with Open Access (OA) publishing in our hybrid and wholly OA journals. This is a first for Cambridge and a welcome innovation in a fast-moving publishing landscape.

The agreement with the UKB (the consortium of the 13 Dutch university libraries and the National Library of the Netherlands) means Dutch affiliated authors from eligible institutions can access all titles within the 2017 Cambridge Journals Full Collection and publish without limitation in both Cambridge hybrid and wholly Open Access journals.”

The Transition to Open Access: The State of the Market, Offsetting Deals, and a Demonstrated Model for Fair Open Access with the Open Library of Humanities

Abstract: In this article, we explore the state of the OA market and the current situation with respect to offsetting deals in the Netherlands. We then offer a case study of the LingOA model for a transition to open access, backed by a consortial funding mechanism: the Open Library of Humanities (OLH). We also suggest how this approach can be extended into new disciplinary spaces (in particular, mathematics and psychology, where there is already some willingness from editors).