OSF | Public Access Submission System (PASS)

“The Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University, the Center for Open Science, MIT Libraries and the Harvard University Office for Scholarly Communication are building the Public Access Submission System (PASS), an open platform that would support researchers’ workflows related to compliance with funding agencies’ public access policies. The main ideas for this project arose based on discussions between Harvard, MIT and COS over the last two years….

While many federal agencies require research results to be made publicly accessible, the processes and requirements to do so vary greatly from one agency to another. The heterogeneous processes and requirements have become burdensome for researchers and their institutions, resulting in lower rates of compliances or compliance efficacies. Federal agencies, however, are not in a position to develop and commit to a solution, which would harmonize these workflows.

On the university side, many researchers are subject to more than one OA policy, for example, a university policy and a funder policy. Similarly, in the case of researches with multiple funding sources, researchers are subjects to public access policies from different funders. Universities would face an implementation nightmare, if the only paths to compliance were the different submission interfaces at different funders and institutions,. A unified submission interface would lighten the load on universities, and improve compliance, even if the unified submission interface were not exclusive….”

Toward Open-source Epidemiology : Epidemiology

“There are equally important reasons for embracing open-source principles. Transparency begets reproducibility and allows subsequent methodologic advancement. Cross-collaboration is inherent in science, and allowing our work to flow unfettered across institutions can propel the field. One such example, the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, which recently become the first open-science institute in the world, foresees accelerated innovation, participation, and implementation of clinical research by removing existing data barriers.”

My journey towards Open Science | Research Data at Springer Nature

“CODATA-RDA schools changed my career, making me a more responsible researcher but also an Open Science ambassador for the Central American area. I now aspire to be a young researcher that can teach Open and Data Science principles through my job at the University of Costa Rica and through the CODATA-RDA Schools, as well as also serve as a mentor for other people that want to learn how to practice Open Science.”

Open and Shut?: Realising the BOAI vision: Peter Suber’s Advice

Peter Suber’s high-priority recommendations for advancing OA.

An Open Letter to the Community from PLOS CEO, Alison Mudditt | The Official PLOS Blog

As the new PLOS CEO, I’ve spent my first months assessing the organization and planning for a thriving future. We are in the midst of shaping our next innovative steps in pursuit of maximal openness and transparency in research communication, and assessing what changes we need to make as an organization. Some of these changes will likely go unnoticed outside of PLOS. Others may cause speculation. For clarity and transparency’s sake, I’ve chosen to write an open letter to the communities PLOS serves, so we can encourage open dialogue and so that you can share in our continuing evolution.

FFAR awards $1 million grant to create open source technology for gene discovery in plants | Crops | hpj.com

“The starting point will be approximately 1,000 human kinase inhibitors carefully selected from a library of chemical compounds donated to the partnership from eight pharmaceutical companies. The set will be distributed without restriction to scientists studying other plants and traits, thus serving as a broadly useful platform. The team has agreed to operate under open access principles —specifically prohibiting filing for IP on any of the results and will communicate the results widely….”

Stencila

“The office suite for reproducible research

The calls for research to be transparent and reproducible have never been louder. But today’s tools for reproducible research can be intimidating – especially if you’re not a coder. We’re building software for reproducible research with the intuitive, visual interfaces that you and your colleagues are used to….”

Matching OA projects with programmers

“Are you an #openaccess project in need of programming help? Are you a programmer or programming team willing to donate time to an OA project? 

Either way, please list yourselves on the new page at the Open Access Directory set up match OA projects with programmers.

http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Matching_OA_projects_with_programmers …”

Student programming volunteers assist an #openaccess project.

“Student programmers are donating programming time to a major #openaccess initiative (https://unglue.it) as a senior capstone project:

“Two teams of Computer Science students from Stevens Institute of Technology are working with us on Free Ebook Foundation projects. One team of five is working to renovate the http://Unglue.it user experience. As their senior-year capstone project, they’ll be implementing a responsive web framework that will make http://Unglue.it easy to use on mobile phones, tablets, and on desktops….”

(I’m quoting an email update from Unglue.it. Unfortunately I can’t find the same update online, or I’d link to it here.)

Someone should start a web site to match OA projects in need of development support with student programmers (or more generally, any programmers) willing to donate their time. If no one else can arrange it, I’ll do it. If people or projects in either category send me their names and contact info, I’ll post them to a wiki page as a makeshift until someone can devise a better way to match them up.”