West Virginia Inmates Will Be Charged by the Minute to Read E-Books on Tablets – Reason.com

“Inmates at several West Virginia prisons are getting free electronic tablets to read books, send emails, and communicate with their families—but there’s a catch.

Any inmates looking to read Moby Dick may find that it will cost them far more than it would have if they’d simply gotten a mass market paperback, because the tablets charge readers by the minute.

Under a 2019 contract between the West Virginia Division of Corrections and Rehabilitation (WVDCR) and Global Tel Link (GTL), the company that is providing electronic multimedia tablets to 10 West Virginia prisons, inmates will be charged 3 cents a minute to read books, even though the books all come from Project Gutenberg, a free online library of more than 60,000 texts in the public domain.

The WVDCR says the tablets provide access to educational materials, incentives for good behavior, and an easy way to stay in touch with loved ones. But the Appalachian Prison Book Project, a nonprofit that offers free books and education to inmates, says the fee structure is exploitative….”

The spirit of openness in Belgrade during the Open Access Week: Conference The Application of Free Software and Open Hardware – OpenAIRE Blog

“The second conference The Application of Free Software and Open Hardware (Primena slobodnog softvera i otvorenog hardvera – PSSOH) was certainly the most vibrant event organized in Serbia on the occasion of the 2019 Open Access Week.”

African Institute of Open Science & Hardware | AfricaOSH

Africa Open Science & Hardware (Africa OSH) is a grassroots effort that brings together researchers, technologists, hacker hobbyists, educators, government officials, and start-up innovators from around the world. Our goal is to create a conversation and set of actions on OSH, among African actors, and between them and the international community, in order to adopt OSH principles and practices appropriate to our context. After two editions of the Africa OSH Summit, it is time to take another step forward in our community’s development strategy. We are delighted to launch the African Institute of Open Science & Hardware, with its main campus in Yaoundé, Cameroon….

The mission of the Institute is to meet current research and training needs in the field of Open Science. This choice is part of the contextualisation of the Global Open Science Hardware Roadmap which lays out recommendations to make open hardware ubiquitous in science by 2025. This would be pursued through (i) activities that enable anyone to gain knowledge and find information about OSH and/or the community (Learn section) and (ii) actions aimed at creating the necessary enabling conditions for the present and future of the OSH community (Support section).”

 

African Institute of Open Science & Hardware – Mboalab

“Africa Open Science & Hardware (Africa OSH) is a grassroots effort that brings together researchers, technologists, hacker hobbyists, educators, government officials, and start-up innovators from around the world. Our goal is to create a conversation and set of actions on OSH, among African actors, and between them and the international community, in order to adopt OSH principles and practices appropriate to our context. After two editions of the Africa OSH Summit, it is time to take another step forward in our community’s development strategy. We are delighted to launch the African Institute of Open Science & Hardware, with its main campus in Yaoundé, Cameroon….

The institute will open its doors on June 3, 2019, with an open residency in Biotechnology and DIYbio. For more information, please contact us at organisers@africaosh.com….”

AfricaOSH

“Africa OSH is a community of makers, hackers, practitioners and researchers in science and technology inclusive of government officials, private sector players and civil society across the African continent, the global south and the world. Africa OSH provides people interested in open science and hardware an alternative to traditional intellectual property (IP) and closed systems as a means to achieve locally adaptable technologies that will foster economic growth in Africa….”

Africa Open Science and Hardware Summit 2019 Application Form

Africa Open Science and Hardware (Africa OSH) Summit is a grassroots effort to bring together researchers, technologists, hacker hobbyists, educators, government officials, and start-up innovators around the world.

Our goal is to create a conversation and set of actions on OSH, among African actors, and between them and the international community, in order to adopt OSH principles and practices appropriate to our context. This alternative path to education, research, scholarly communication and manufacturing is crucial given the barriers imposed by closed knowledge systems and the traditional Intellectual Property (IP) regime.

Ultimately OSH aims to achieve an ecosystem for innovation that is locally adapted, culturally relevant, technologically feasible, economically viable, and environmentally sustainable

The Africa OSH Summit 2019 plans to host about 200 participants from across Africa and the rest of the world for 4 days in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania….”

Build free and open source scientific equipment following demand

“Your participation will enable us to develop a series of online tutorials related to building affordable equipment. It will also help us identify opportunities for the creation of equipment distributed under open/permissive licenses. Under these types of licenses, the created equipment can be used, modified, copied, and improved for new use cases.

It should take less then 10 minutes to complete this questionnaire. By participating in this survey, you can opt-in to a lottery for one of two books related to science and open source hardware….”

A Data Sharing Renaissance: Music to My Ears! – Office of Science Policy

“When world famous cellist, Yo-Yo Ma, visited the NIH campus, he shared a story from the history of music, in which the peak of stringed instrument quality occurred in the late 17th century at a time of great collaboration and sharing of knowledge. When instrument makers began to compete, all of that changed: secrets of craftsmanship were held close and the quality of instruments plummeted. This decline lasted, according to Ma, until the 20th century, when again the free-flow of knowledge resumed. NIH Director Francis Collins noted, “There’s a lesson here about science.”

Data sharing is important. It is critical to continued progress in science, to maximize our investment in research, and to ensure the highest levels of transparency and rigor in science. But data sharing is a means to an end, not itself an end goal and, as such, needs to be done thoughtfully, in a way that fulfills the vision and mission of NIH and continues the advancement of treatments for disease and improvement of human health. NIH has long been on the forefront of making access to the results of our research accessible and has described our vision for expanding access to publications and data both in the 2015 NIH Plan for Increasing Access to Scientific Publications and Digital Scientific and in the 2018 Strategic Plan for Data Science….

Today, NIH released a notice in its Guide to Grants and Contracts that seeks public input on the key policy provisions that NIH is considering for inclusion in a future draft policy aimed at replacing NIH’s existing Data Sharing Policy. By obtaining robust stakeholder feedback we can help ensure that the future NIH policy will promote opportunities for data management and sharing while allowing flexibility for various data types, sharing platforms, and strategies.  The information stakeholders provide can also assist us in developing streamlined approaches that could potentially reduce unnecessary administrative burdens….”

Cellist Yo-Yo Ma Talks Music, Science – The NIH Record – January 27, 2017

“Great improvements, said [Yo Yo] Ma, can come from collaboration. He said his cello was crafted in Cremona, Italy, at a time when apprenticeships were popular and the quality of instruments peaked, between 1695 and 1735. But then instrument makers around the world began competing for business and keeping secrets.

“There’s a lesson here about science, I think,” interjected Collins.

In the ensuing two centuries, Ma said, the quality of instruments plummeted. In the 1970s, however, apprenticeships resumed around the world; knowledge flowed and the quality of instruments dramatically improved….”