Section 512: University and Research Libraries as Rightsholders | Authors Alliance

“In most cases and for most of the published research Duke produces, we aim to disseminate these works with no direct financial return; no royalty. If possible, our authors generally want no financial barrier to stand in the way of engagement with their research, operating under the idea that more and faster progress will be made without those barriers. In many cases, we find ourselves licensing around the controls that copyright law automatically provides. For example, more than ten years ago, Duke Faculty voted to adopt an institutional open access policy that provides for free, widespread distribution of research articles that Duke faculty have authored….

Given our interest in widespread dissemination of ideas, for research and academic work our strong preference is a system that is biased toward keeping content up online unless there is strong evidence that an infringement has occurred. The current notice and takedown system does not always accomplish this goal….

First, for some academic works, the ownership of rights is far from clear. Although authors are the holders of those rights initially, they are often asked to license them away at least in part through publishing contracts that are confusing and vary significantly from journal to journal and which can change with some frequency. As a result, some academic authors are unsure of whether they are legally permitted to share their own work online under the terms of their publishing agreement. Many research articles are also subject to pre-existing licenses that attach automatically upon creation—for example, at Duke under our Open Access policy—which provide that authors and their institutions retain certain rights to share and reuse their work. My experience with takedown requests we receive at Duke is that publishers do not take into account pre-existing open access licenses even though their existence is widely known….

Second, and perhaps the most important thing I can convey, is how important fair use is for research, teaching, and for libraries that support those functions….

Section 512 does not explicitly address how fair use factors into the notice and takedown process….[I]n practice we know that in many instances automated content identification systems are the first method of assessment, and they do not handle fair use assertions well….”

Cooperation and the Creation of a National Emergency Library – UNC Press Blog

“In the context of the unprecedented challenges associated with the spread of COVID-19, many of you will have read about an effort from the Internet Archive (IA) to launch a “National Emergency Library” (NEL). Essentially, the NEL was an effort to create unlimited access to digital editions of books in their collection. At a time when physical libraries were closing, this ambitious effort to open up content that had been previously limited or subject to paywalls was both praised and criticized.

At our presses we had already agreed to allow open digital access to our scholarly collections. At UNC Press, we opened our book collections in platforms like Project MUSE, Books at JSTOR, Ebsco, and ProQuest. Duke University Press offered free platform access to digital collections of books and journals to requesting libraries through June 30, 2020. Over 200 libraries have taken Duke up on this offer. Duke University Press opened up content to the public in several timely syllabi, including Navigating the Threat of Pandemic and Care in Uncertain Times. These arrangements had been made through dialog and discussion with those vendors who sought our perspective and permission.

The NEL was different in that the IA acted unilaterally and blurred legal arguments with extra-legal (read: emergency) justifications. This ignored the agency that authors and publishers legally and conventionally exercise. And as our colleague Karin Wulf from the Omohundro Institute wrote, it ignored the systems that invest in the production of these books.

After IA acted unilaterally in creating the National Emergency Library, we criticized the effort and presses began the process of withdrawing titles. However, after a conference call with the leadership of the IA and many university press directors, we realized our two presses shared many of the same goals of the NEL, but we simply disagreed with the process by which the main goal was being achieved.

After this conference call, we subsequently opened a separate line of communication with the IA and we’re pleased to announce that within a few days, we created a one-page Statement of Cooperation to allow our university press titles to participate in the NEL….”

Duke ScholarWorks

“As technology continues to evolve, the possibilities and challenges of scholarly publishing evolve with it. You can share your work broadly, online, without necessarily working with a publisher. Or you may want to do additional things to make your work available that your publisher is not ready to help with. How can you best reach your intended audiences, build engagement, track use, be rewarded for your work, and sustain your publication or project over time?

Staff of the ScholarWorks center in Duke Libraries can help members of the Duke community with all of the above, and much more. See scholarworks.duke.edu and the menu items above, or contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas, and we’ll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

The mission of the ScholarWorks Center for Scholarly Publishing is to make scholarly publishing better: more sustainable, fair, and open. Our focus is particularly on how to help Duke researchers to benefit from changes in scholarly publishing and to help them in turn to create positive change in the broader publishing ecosystem….”

Mellon Grant Continues Support of Triangle Scholarly Communications Institute – Duke University Libraries Blogs

“The Duke University Libraries have a received a grant of $360,000 from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to continue support of the Triangle Scholarly Communication Institute (TriangleSCI).

Every year, the TriangleSCI brings together teams of scholars, information scientists, librarians, publishers, technologists, and others from both inside and outside academia to discuss needs and opportunities in the domain of scholarly communications….”

Mellon Grant Continues Support of Triangle Scholarly Communications Institute – Duke University Libraries Blogs

“The Duke University Libraries have a received a grant of $360,000 from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to continue support of the Triangle Scholarly Communication Institute (TriangleSCI).

Every year, the TriangleSCI brings together teams of scholars, information scientists, librarians, publishers, technologists, and others from both inside and outside academia to discuss needs and opportunities in the domain of scholarly communications….”

Project Euclid and SPIE announce publishing technology partnership

“Project Euclid and SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, announced today a publishing technology partnership to launch a new Project Euclid platform late in 2020. Project Euclid, jointly managed by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press, is an online host and aggregator of over 100 scholarly journals, book series, and conference proceedings in mathematics and statistics. SPIE will develop and power Project Euclid’s new platform in an innovative technology model that brings nonprofit organizations together for the shared development of major publishing infrastructure….”

OSPRI Home | Open Source Pedagogy, Research + Innovation (OSPRI) @ Duke

“Mission: Harness the power of open source principles and methodologies to design and scale open learning contexts for a more equitable and collaborative world.

OSPRI is transforming education for the 21st century. Guided by open source principles and methodologies like open knowledge and access to information, collaboration and community, transparency and meritocracy, inclusion and diversity, and iterative creation and adaptability, OSPRI is designing an open learning ecosystem for a more open world….”

O S P R I – Open Source Pedagogy, Research + Innovation

“OSPRI (Open Source Pedagogy, Research + Innovation) is an education innovation model inspired by open source principles and methodologies. Jointly housed in Duke University’s Social Science Research Institute and Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative with generous support from Red Hat, OSPRI develops interdisciplinary, project-based, student-centered curricular and co-curricular learning environments that empower students to be engaged agents of their learning and life pathways.

OSPRI is rooted in the open source values of open knowledge and access to information and promotes the use and generation of open educational resources. Focused on authentic, personalized learning, OSPRI’s curriculum design underscores the open source principles of collaboration and transparency, inclusion and diversity, and iterative and agile creation. In addition to developing an open source curricular pathway, OSPRI’s open learning ecosystem includes: collaborating with industry partners to create experiential, mentored learning; supporting student open source innovation project teams, hackathons, and challenges; presenting workshops on topics related to open pedagogy and open source culture and development processes; contributing to open access publications; and leading academic summits on making open the default position for teaching and learning, communicating, and creating within and beyond academia….”

Open Access: Project Euclid | Duke University Press News

“We have created a series of five blog posts covering open access at Duke University Press. Today’s post features Project Euclid, a not-for-profit hosting and publishing platform for the mathematics and statistics communities, managed jointly by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press. Here Leslie Eager, Director of Publishing Services for Project Euclid, shares more about the platform and the ways it supports open access in the mathematics and statistics world.

Our goal at Project Euclid is to make mathematics and statistics publications easy and affordable to find and read online. Supporting open-access publishing is a huge part of that mission. About 70% of Project Euclid is open access.

 

With Project Euclid the idea is to provide low-cost but feature-rich hosting services for journals, books, and conference proceedings so that publishers can keep the scholarship affordable and widely available to libraries and researchers while sustaining themselves financially. We partner with math and stats publishers around the world.”