OpenCon 2017: The OpenCon Platform » Open@VT

“As part of Open Access Week, the University Libraries and the Graduate School offered a travel scholarship to OpenCon 2017, a conference for early career researchers on open access, open data, and open educational resources. From a pool of many strong essay applications, we chose Alexis Villacis, a Ph.D. student in Agricultural and Applied Economics. Alexis attended the conference in Berlin, Germany on November 11-13, and sent the report below. Be sure to check out the OpenCon 2017 highlights….”

An introduction to Open Research (for PhD students in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences) | University of Cambridge, Scholarly Communication

“Description Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions? Would you like to boost citations of your work? Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants? These are questions for postgraduate students at all stages of their research.

Event date:  Thursday, 1 February, 2018 Who is this event for?:  Researchers PhDs PIs

Event link:  An introduction to Open Research (for PhD students in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences)”

Open Science, Open Data, Open Source: 21st century research skills for the life sciences by Pedro L. Fernandes and Rutger A. Vos | 2017 · GitBook

“Who is this for? The goal of these resources is to give a bird’s eye view of the developments in open scientific research. That is, we cover both social developments (e.g. the culture in various communities) as well as technological ones. As such, no part of the contents are especially in-depth or geared towards advanced users of specific practices or tools. Nevertheless, certain sections are more relevant to some people than to others. Specifically: The most interesting sections for Graduate students will be about navigating the literature, managing evolving projects, and publishing and reviewing. Lab technicians may derive the most benefit from the sections about capturing data, working with reproducibility in mind and sharing data. For data scientists, the sections on organizing computational projects as workflows, managing versions of data and source code, open source software development, and data representation will be most relevant. Principal investigators may be most interested in the sections on data management, data sharing, and coping with evolving projects. Scientific publishers may be interested to know how scientists navigate the literature, what the expectations are for enhanced publications, and the needs for data publishing. Science funders and policy makers may easily find value in the capturing data, data management, data sharing and navigating the literature. Science communicators may be more interested in exploring the content by starting with navigating the literature, working with reproducibility in mind and sharing data….”

Open and Shut?: Realising the BOAI vision: Peter Suber’s Advice

Peter Suber’s high-priority recommendations for advancing OA.

Early career researchers want Open Science | Genome Biology | Full Text

“Open Science is encouraged by the European Union and many other political and scientific institutions. However, scientific practice is proving slow to change. We propose, as early career researchers, that it is our task to change scientific research into open scientific research and commit to Open Science principles.”

Green Open Access: An Imperfect Standard – Politics, Distilled

“In my last post on the lack of accessibility of Gold Open Access for early career researchers (ECRs), I mentioned that in my opinion Green Open Access was a very imperfect solution – in fact, hardly a solution at all.  I expand here on why that is the case, and why a focus on green OA presents new challenges for publication practices which compound the – already many – challenges of moving towards a greater accessibility of research. Not all OA initiatives are equal.  Green Open Access, by far the commonest kind, refers to the depositing of a non-final version of the published manuscript into a research repository – generally either an institutional repository (managed by the university with which the researcher is affiliated), a subject-specific repository (such as ArXiv/SocArXiv), an academic networking website such as Academia.edu, ResearchGate, or Mendeley, or a personal website.  Various publishers have rules on what version can be posted where and when, with the most common being that accepted manuscripts (after peer-review, but before proofreading and typesetting) can be made public in repositories after an embargo period, while the “version of record” – the published version – may not be shared publicly for free.  The published article remains accessible only with paid access (with publishers either explicitly authorizing (SAGE) or tacitly tolerating the private sharing of full articles.”

Center for Open Science Launches Thesis Commons, an Open-source Platform for Theses and Dissertations

“The Center for Open Science (COS) is pleased to announce the release of Thesis Commons, a free, cloud-based, open-source platform for the submission, dissemination, and discovery of graduate and undergraduate theses and dissertations from any discipline. Authors can share their electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) with a quick and easy submission workflow.  Readers can search, discover, and download with a clean and simple interface. Institutions can sign-up for a branded version of the service for their institutional community for hosting ETDs, preprints, or other scholarship.  

Thesis Commons in part of  a rapidly growing community of open scholarly communication services built on an open-source infrastructure called the Open Science Framework (OSF).  As a shared, public good, the OSF dramatically lowers the barrier to entry for communities to introduce and operate services across the research lifecycle such as preprints, ETD repositories, and data or materials archives.  With a planned integration of a peer review service layer, communities will be able to moderate these services directly and operate discipline-specific repositories or journals with a common integrated infrastructure.”

Center for Open Science Launches Thesis Commons, an Open-source Platform for Theses and Dissertations

“The Center for Open Science (COS) is pleased to announce the release of Thesis Commons, a free, cloud-based, open-source platform for the submission, dissemination, and discovery of graduate and undergraduate theses and dissertations from any discipline. Authors can share their electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) with a quick and easy submission workflow.  Readers can search, discover, and download with a clean and simple interface. Institutions can sign-up for a branded version of the service for their institutional community for hosting ETDs, preprints, or other scholarship.  

Thesis Commons in part of  a rapidly growing community of open scholarly communication services built on an open-source infrastructure called the Open Science Framework (OSF).  As a shared, public good, the OSF dramatically lowers the barrier to entry for communities to introduce and operate services across the research lifecycle such as preprints, ETD repositories, and data or materials archives.  With a planned integration of a peer review service layer, communities will be able to moderate these services directly and operate discipline-specific repositories or journals with a common integrated infrastructure.”