ERC Scientific Council withdraws support for Plan S – Research Professional News

“Reversal is intended to ‘preserve equity among research communities’ and protect young researchers

The European Research Council’s governing Scientific Council—an independent body of researchers that sets the strategic direction for the flagship EU research funder—has announced it is withdrawing its support for the radical open-access initiative Plan S, which the ERC is due to align with from 2021.

“In doing so, the ERC Scientific Council wishes to pay closer attention to a number of aspects [of Plan S] whose importance has been rather underestimated,” the Council said on 20 July.

It cited concerns over how Plan S will affect researchers’ needs, “especially those of young researchers”, as well as the “need to preserve equity among research communities and among European countries, with particular emphasis on countries with more limited national financial support for research”. …”

Data Steward/Champion questionnaire

“Thank you for taking part in our short questionnaire. The Early Career Researchers Advisory Board (ECRAB) are currently carrying out a Data Sharing Campaign (https://think.f1000research.com/ecrab-data-sharing/) which aims to grow a culture of data sharing. We hope to do this by raising awareness, sharing information and developing discipline specific resources on data sharing to help all researchers shift to open science practices. As part of this campaign we are interested in speaking to data stewards, across the world, to determine what support you are lacking and what problems/difficulties you encounter around data sharing. This will help us identify common problems and determine which resources we should focus on producing….”

Sharing research with academia and beyond: Insights from early career researchers in Australia and Japan – Merga – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Quality scholarly research outputs, such as peer reviewed journal articles published in reputable journals, are essential for early career researchers’ (ECRs) vocational success while also offering benefits for their institutions. Research outputs destined for audiences beyond academia are also increasingly valued by funders, end users, and tertiary institutions. While there is an expectation that ECRs may create diverse research outputs for an array of audiences, the kinds of research output texts produced by ECRs for varied audiences warrants further investigation. In addition, the routes of dissemination that ECRs use to share their academic research outputs to secure impact beyond academia are not well understood. Drawing on semi?structured interviews of 30 respondents in Australia and Japan, we explore the research?sharing practices of ECRs, finding that ECRs may potentially create a wide range of research?informed texts for end users beyond academia, using an array of methods for dissemination. The examples of the output text types and dissemination routes we provide in this paper can be used to inspire ECRs and also more senior academics to share their research more broadly, and perhaps more effectively, and can be used by publishers to improve research impact and support ECRs’ research translation.

 

Chinese researchers’ perceptions and use of open access journals: Results of an online questionnaire survey – Xu – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  This paper reports the results of a survey on Chinese researchers’ perceptions and use of open access journals (OAJs). A total of 381 Chinese researchers from different universities and disciplines were investigated through an online questionnaire survey in August and September 2018. The results showed that most Chinese researchers are familiar with and have positive attitude to OAJs. They know OAJs mainly through their peers, colleagues, and friends. PubMed Central, PLoS, and COAJ (China Open Access Journals) are the most well?known OAJ websites among Chinese researchers. As for use, most of the respondents read and cite OAJs frequently and have experience of publishing in OAJs. However, they strongly prefer to use OAJs indexed in reputable databases (e.g. Web of Science, WoS) when making publishing decisions. Significant differences can be seen among disciplines, with researchers in HSS areas using OAJs less frequently than researchers from other disciplines, although they have the same positive attitudes and are equally well informed about them. Younger researchers preferred to rely on prestigious institutions and authors when using OAJs.

 

A global questionnaire survey of the scholarly communication attitudes and behaviours of early career researchers – Nicholas – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  This article describes an international study informed by a 3?year?long qualitative longitudinal project, which sought to discover the scholarly communication attitudes and behaviour of early career researchers (ECRs). Using a combination of small?scale interviews and a larger?scale survey, ECRs were questioned on their searching and reading behaviour, publishing practices, open data, and their use of social media. Questionnaire invitations were sent out via publisher lists, social media networks, university research networks, and specialist ECR membership organizations. One?thousand and six?hundred responses were received, with many coming from China, Russia, and Poland. Results showed that ECRs are adopting millennial?facing tools/platforms, with Google, Google Scholar, social media, and smartphones becoming embedded in their scholarly activities. Open data sharing obtains widespread support but somewhat less practice. There are some differences in attitudes and behaviour according to age and subject specialism.

 

Faculty are concerned about research assessment in the wake of COVID-19 – DORA

“Starting in mid-February, research that needed to be conducted in a laboratory or another setting on campus was dramatically scaled back or, more likely, stopped completely. This disruption has drawn attention to long-standing challenges in academia, including the ways that researchers are assessed for hiring, promotion, and tenure. Figuring out how to put the academic workforce on a better footing following the pandemic is a major question that needs to be addressed….”

Monitoring the effects of Plan S on Research and Scholarly Communication: an update | Plan S

“To initiate the dialogue amongst stakeholders on the effects of Plan S, cOAlition S has developed a monitoring framework by which funding agencies who are signatories of Plan S can track or monitor the most significant of these effects, both positive and negative. This framework has been primarily informed by the type of data funding agencies can collect and other available data sets, such that collated data against indicators from a cross-section of Plan S signatories will inform which effects are being realised and guide how cOAlition S might mitigate these effects….”

Fighting the impact factor, one CV at a time

“The impact factor was never meant to be used like that.  

So what can we do about that? Initiatives are being taken (such as the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment) to encourage institutions not to use the impact factor in their evaluation procedures.

At the level of the individual researcher, there is something simple each one of us can do: remove journal names from the list of publications on your CV. No journal names, no (implicit or explicit) link to the corresponding impact factor. People reading your CV will be much more likely to read your paper titles….”

New educational website on FAIR research data released – OpenAIRE Blog

“On the 3rd of July 2020 a new website was released which takes a deep dive into the practicalities of making FAIR research data. The site is conceived as a blended learning resource targeted at researchers in all disciplines and the goal is to show how they can make their own research data more FAIR through real life examples from the Humanities, Social, Natural, and Health Sciences. The site is based on written explanations garnished with video testimonials from 9 different researchers and scientists. It is estimated that you can consume the entire website content in about 2 hours, and it is designed for you to easy go back and revisit specific parts of the website through the top navigation. 

The intention is to integrate the website into the curriculum of the Ph.D.-courses on Responsible Conduct of Research at the University of Southern Denmark and other institutions making the research communities able to start the FAIRyfication of their research data at an early stage in their careers. …”

New educational website on FAIR research data released – OpenAIRE Blog

“On the 3rd of July 2020 a new website was released which takes a deep dive into the practicalities of making FAIR research data. The site is conceived as a blended learning resource targeted at researchers in all disciplines and the goal is to show how they can make their own research data more FAIR through real life examples from the Humanities, Social, Natural, and Health Sciences. The site is based on written explanations garnished with video testimonials from 9 different researchers and scientists. It is estimated that you can consume the entire website content in about 2 hours, and it is designed for you to easy go back and revisit specific parts of the website through the top navigation. 

The intention is to integrate the website into the curriculum of the Ph.D.-courses on Responsible Conduct of Research at the University of Southern Denmark and other institutions making the research communities able to start the FAIRyfication of their research data at an early stage in their careers. …”