Free the Law – Amicus Brief in Georgia v. Public.Resource.Org

“In 2013, Public.Resource.Org (PRO), a non-profit corporation based in California, purchased, scanned, and posted the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (OCGA).  The OCGA is the one and only official law of the State of Georgia, but the state objected strongly, maintaining that the only party who could make the OCGA available was their single, designated commercial vendor.  According to the State of Georgia, any other use–including PRO’s public dissemination of the law–is a copyright violation.

The State of Georgia sued Public Resource in the U.S. District Court and received judgement in their favor including a federal injunction prohibiting any and all dissemination of the code.  PRO appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and won a 3-0 victory, reversing the decision of the court below.

The State of Georgia appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.  Public Resource responded, maintaining that the State of Georgia has the law and the facts wrong, but nevertheless, the matter should be reviewed by the U.S. Supreme Court.

We prepared a amicus brief on behalf of 119 law students, 54 solo and small-firm practitioners of aw, and 21 legal educators in support of Public.Resource.Org, arguing that the Supreme Court should take the case to ensure that we have free access to all of the law nationwide, and not just to Georgia’s law.

The Supreme Court has since agreed to take the case….”

Georgia v. Public.Resource.org: Ending Private Copyright in Public Statutes

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear the State of Georgia’s appeal in Georgia v. Public.Resource.org, addressing whether an official version of state statutes can be copyrighted by a private publisher. (In October 2018, the Eleventh Circuit ruled in favor of Public.Resource.org that private publishers cannot claim copyright in public law, and this is an appeal of that ruling.)…”

Georgia v. Public.Resource.org: Ending Private Copyright in Public Statutes

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear the State of Georgia’s appeal in Georgia v. Public.Resource.org, addressing whether an official version of state statutes can be copyrighted by a private publisher. (In October 2018, the Eleventh Circuit ruled in favor of Public.Resource.org that private publishers cannot claim copyright in public law, and this is an appeal of that ruling.)…”

SCOTUS agrees to decide whether annotated state laws can be copyrighted

Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether annotations of the Georgia state code can be copyrighted.

The court agreed to decide Georgia’s appeal in its suit for copyright infringement against open law advocate Carl Malamud. Malamud had bought and scanned 186 printed volumes of Georgia’s annotated code and posted it to his website, Public.Resource.org….”

SCOTUS agrees to decide whether annotated state laws can be copyrighted

Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether annotations of the Georgia state code can be copyrighted.

The court agreed to decide Georgia’s appeal in its suit for copyright infringement against open law advocate Carl Malamud. Malamud had bought and scanned 186 printed volumes of Georgia’s annotated code and posted it to his website, Public.Resource.org….”

Georgia claims that publishing its state laws for free online is ‘terrorism’ – LA Times

“Gvernment officials have threatened “rogue archivist” Carl Malamud with legal action many times for his efforts to make public government documents widely available for free, but the state of Georgia has set a new standard for fighting this ridiculous battle: It’s suing Malamud for infringing its copyright of state laws by — horrors — publishing them online.

The state’s lawsuit, filed last week in Atlanta federal court, accuses Malamud of piracy — and worse, of “a form of ‘terrorism.'” His offense: Through his website, public.resource.org, he provides members of the public access to a searchable and downloadable scan of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated — that is, the entire body of state law. The state wants a court order forcing Malamud to stop….”