Developing an Open Access, Competency-Based Global Oral Health Curriculum: A Global Health Starter Kit | Journal of Dental Education

Abstract:  Dental education has seen increases in global health and international educational experiences in many dental schools’ curricula. In response, the Consortium of Universities for Global Health’s Global Oral Health Interest Group aims to develop readily available, open access resources for competency-based global oral health teaching and learning. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a Global Health Starter Kit (GHSK), an interdisciplinary, competency-based, open access curriculum for dental faculty members who wish to teach global oral health in their courses. Phase I (2012-17) evaluated longitudinal outcomes from two Harvard School of Dental Medicine pilot global health courses with 32 advanced and 34 predoctoral dental students. In Phase II (2018), the Phase I outcomes informed development, implementation, and evaluation of the open access GHSK (45 enrollees) written by an interdisciplinary, international team of 13 content experts and consisting of five modules: Global Trends, Global Goals, Back to Basics: Primary Care, Social Determinants and Risks, and Ethics and Sustainability. In Phase III (summer and fall 2018), five additional pilot institutions (two U.S. dental schools, one U.S. dental hygiene program, and two dental schools in low- and middle-income countries) participated in an early adoption of the GHSK curriculum. The increase in perceived knowledge scores of students enrolled in the pilot global health courses was similar to those enrolled in the GHSK, suggesting the kit educated students as well or better in nearly all categories than prior course materials. This study found the GHSK led to improvements in learning in the short term and may also contribute to long-term career planning and decision making by providing competency-based global health education.

Open Access, the next step in evolution

“Evolution is described as the gradual process of change and development, in which sometimes a quantum jump occurs in order to adapt to the environment. We will do just this with Oral Health and Preventive Dentistry, thus giving it the larger audience it deserves.

In order to do this we will move from paper to online- only publication and make it Open Access, free of charge for whoever is interested in the subject matter. Issue No. 6, 2019 will be the last printed issue.

Starting with the first Issue in 2020, the journal will be an open access journal, available to the entire dental world to read and learn from. So yes, your journal that you know and love will be free for you starting next year….”

Open Access, the next step in evolution

“Evolution is described as the gradual process of change and development, in which sometimes a quantum jump occurs in order to adapt to the environment. We will do just this with Oral Health and Preventive Dentistry, thus giving it the larger audience it deserves.

In order to do this we will move from paper to online- only publication and make it Open Access, free of charge for whoever is interested in the subject matter. Issue No. 6, 2019 will be the last printed issue.

Starting with the first Issue in 2020, the journal will be an open access journal, available to the entire dental world to read and learn from. So yes, your journal that you know and love will be free for you starting next year….”

The availability of open access videos offered by dental schools – Dias da Silva – – European Journal of Dental Education – Wiley Online Library

Abstract. Aim

 

Evaluate the video content offered by UK and Republic of Ireland (RoI) Dental Schools on their YouTube channels and public websites.

Methods

Free videos offered on UK and RoI Dental schools websites and YouTube channels, were watched and set according to its purpose, as educational or non?educational. The number of views, length, category and date of publication were analysed.

Results

A total of 627 videos offered by dental courses were evaluated. Videos were available on 83% of the websites, but only 9% was educational content. Dental courses YouTube channels received more than 2.3 million views, but less than 5% of the material offered is educational. Instructional videos found on the websites (3.2 min) were shorter than those found on YouTube (8.5 min) (p=0.03). The majority of the videos, provided by Universities, were not educational and focused on promoting the dental courses. Most websites have demonstrated a password protected area where quality content may be offered.

Conclusion

Students wishing to watch instructional videos will find limited educational content provided by UK and RoI dental courses. Therefore they are likely to access course related material elsewhere on the Internet that may not be necessarily peer?reviewed.

Private health funds accused of misusing patient data for commercial gain | afr.com

“The inquiry, for which submissions close on July 29, is examining the benefits and costs of data being shared more widely between public sector agencies, private sector organisations, the research sector, academics and the community…. 

In a submission by Australian Dental Association (ADA) president Dr Rick Olive, the peak body said the way some private health insurers were already behaving should be a warning on the perils of data sharing….

Fintech player Tyro Payments meanwhile called for the right to see, use and share data to be mandated in a clearer way, saying existing rights under the Privacy Act of 1988 were effectively neutered in practice.

Tyro said data sharing would see consumers of financial services “benefit from vastly broader product choice and competitive terms”.

Meanwhile, banks that open access to data and create external application programming interfaces could “benefit because it would enable them to become more of a ‘platform’ for other services”. …”